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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

REPORT 

OF THE 

BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDED 30th JUNE 
1937 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 
SESSIONAL PAPER No. 12, 1938 




ONTARIO 



TORONTO 
Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 3 8 



lAIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



REPORT 



OF THE 



BOARD OF GOVERNORS 

For the Year Ended 30th June. 1937 



To His Honour the Lieulenant-Governor-in-Council: 

The Governors of the University of Toronto have the honour to present their 
thirty-first annual report, which is accompanied hy the President's review of the 
academic work of the University and its Colleges for the Session 1936-37 and the 
reports of various officers and departments. The President's report conveys in a very 
comprehensive manner the innumerable activities of the University, and its relation to 
public service is being emphasized more each year. 

There are also presented the usual statements covering the funds and assets, 
including investments, as they stood at the close of business on 30th June. 1937, 
together with detailed statements of the receipts and expenditures of the Board for 
the fiscal year which ended on that date, and the certificate of audit of the same by 
Mr. G. T. Clarkson of the firm of Clarkson, Gordon, Dilworth and Nash. 

The auditor's report states that all the transactions of the year upon the Revenue 
and Capital accounts have been duly audited and found correct; that the securities 
representing the investments which are held for safekeeping by the Canadian Bank 
of Commerce, were produced for his examination twice during the year and found 
to be in agreement with the Bursar's records; and that this officer s records are well 
kept and all endowment and trust funds properly accounted for. While a few 
municipal bonds continue in default, this is the experience of practically every 
investment corporation today; and the high character of the investments as a whole 
is shown by the fact that their market value on 30th June was greater than their book 
value by approximately $860,110. 

The Governors during the year availed themselves of an opportunity which 
presented itself of purchasing at an exceptionally low figure. SU5.000. the property 
known as No. 53 St. George Street, the purchase being financed from the proceeds 
of the Whitney Bequest. 

The general revenue for the year amounted to $1,703,941. There was also 
credited to revenue the Legislative Grant of S920.000 and a Supplementary Special 
Grant of $180,000, making a gross total of $2,803,941. There is, however, to be 

[3] 



4 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 No. 12 

deducted from this sum $67,925 for interest written to certain scholarship and trust 
funds, leaving available for expenditure for salaries and maintenance, $2,736,016. 

The expenditure under the appropriations made by the Board for these purposes 
(exclusive of the Ontario College of Education which is maintained by a separate 
vote) totalled $2,704,243. 

Every effort was made during the year to reduce all controllable expenditure, 
and as a result a net saving of $31,773 was effected. This sum when applied to the 
debit balance of $45,878 which was carried down from the previous year leaves a 
final deficit on revenue account of $14,105. 



All of which is respectfully sultmitted. 



Toronto. 25th November. 193/. 



D. Bruce Macdonald. 

Chairman. 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 
1936-1937 



To the Governors of the University of Toronto: 

Gentlemen: 

I have the honour to present herewith my report on the academic work of 
the University and Universit^ College for the twelve months ending on the 30th 
June, 1937: ' 

Introduction 

The vear has not been marked by spectacular happenings but by general 
advance and sustained activity. This has been due to the cordial co-operation of 
the staff, both academic and administrative. The University of Toronto is a vast 
and varied organism, the responsibilities for whose direction, supervision and 
inspiration grow heavier year by year. A fine loyalty pervades the whole. We go 
forward in high hope and good courage to discharge as best we can the task of 
training and stimulating men and women "to think strenuously about the great 
issues of right and wrong, of liberty and government, on which both for the indi- 
vidual and community a balanced judgment is essential to a rational life." 

Never forget that the staff really makes the University. To keep our academic 
rank in the world of letters and science, and to do the best work we can for the 
students under our charge, we must maintain a high standard of teaching staff and 
an adequate scale of remuneration for them. 

I commend to your careful attention the detailed reports of the various faculties 
and departments of the University and of University College. These are appended. 
In this preface to the full report. I deal only with some of the main features of the 
years work. 

Attendance 

The total number of students enrolled was 8136, of whom 4987 were men and 
3149 women; 7448 being registered in the colleges and faculties and 688 in the 
departments. The number of students proceeding to degrees was 6541 and to diplomas 
818. Of the students in attendance 4007 came from Toronto, and 3363 from other 
parts of the Province of Ontario. Every county is represented. There has been 
an increase in registration of 188. 

The Staff 

The total staff of the University and University College numbered 876, of whom 
119 were professors. 68 associate professors. 85 assistant professors. 217 lecturers, 
associates ( in medicine and dentistry I and instructors in the Ontario College of 
Education, 1 director. 2 assistant directors. 384 demonstrators, fellows and instructors 
with sessional appointments. In the Federated Colleges there are 108. The total 
number in the complete staff is 984. 

During the year we have suffered loss of members of the staff in the past and 
present, whose services to the University and to the world of science have been 
conspicuous. The list of deaths is as follows: 

W. A. Parks. B.A., Ph.D.. professor emeritus, faculty of arts; A. E. Webster, 
M.D., D.D.S.. (Chic), M.D.S.. LL. D., professor emeritus, faculty of dentistry; 
L. B. Stewart. D.T.S., professor emeritus, geodesy and surveying; Oskar Klotz. M.B.. 

[5] 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



M.D., CM. (McG. I, professor of pathology and hecteriology; F. W. Marlow,M.D., 
CM., associate professor of obstetrics and gynaecology; G. H. Locke. M.A.. B.Paed., 
LL.D., special lecturer, library school; J. E. Bates, B.A. (McM.I, M.B., lecturer in 
pathology; W. H. Williams, M.A. (Qu. I, B. Paed., instructor, University Schools; 
M. M. Crawford. M.B., associate, medical jurisprudence, R. J. Hamilton. B.A., man- 
ager University Press, Miss H. M. Latter, B.A., secretary, department of university 
extension and publicity. 

To Professor Parks, who died on October 3rd, 1936, and Dr. A. E. Webster, 
'.vho died November 5th, 1936. a full reference was made in last year's report at 
the time of their retirement from active work. They have left happy memories and 
inspirations to their colleagues and students. 

Professor Louis Beaufort Stewart passed away on March 15, the last of the 
three original members of the staff of the School of Practical Science. His colleagues 
were Dean Galbraith and Dr. W. H. Ellis. For thirty years he was professor of 
surveying and geodesy, and for some years previous he had lectured on the same 
subject. The son of a great surveyor, he shared with his father the achievement 
of surveying and laying out the Banff National Park. He was an able jnathema- 
tician. and on this basis buih up a fine superstructure of practical geodetic surveys. 
He retired from active work on the staff in 1931. 

In the person of Dr. Oskar Klotz. who died on November 3rd, 1936, after a 
brave fight to the very end against an incurable disease, the LIniversity lost one of 
its most distinguished teachers and the whole world one of its leading research 
pathologists. In truth he was a martyr in the cause of science. The son of Dr. 
Otto Klotz. late director of the Dominion Observatories, he was born in Preston in 
1878. He graduated in medicine from the University of Toronto in 1902. He did 
postgraduate work at McGill University under Professor Adami, receiving the 
degree of M.D., CM. in 1906, and serving there as a demonstrator and lecturer 
in patholog}' and bacteriology. During his postgraduate years he visited pathological 
laboratories in the Universities of Bonn, 1905; Freiburg, 1908; and marburg 1914. 
From 1910 to 1920 he held the chair of pathology and bacteriologv in the Lniversity 
of Pittsburgh, Pa. During the war years he acted as consulting pathologist to the 
War Department at Washington. He was so successful in building up a strong 
department of pathology at Pittsburgh that the Health Board of the Rockefeller 
Institue appointed him to reorganise the department of pathology in the University 
of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Here he remained from 1920 to 1923. and here his interest 
was aroused in the pathology of yellow fever. In 1923 his Alma Mater, the University 
of Toronto, called him back to be professor of Pathology and bacteriology, in 
succession to the well-beloved Professor J. J. Mackenzie. 

During his tenure of our chair he was commissioned by the Rockefeller 
Institute to investigate yellow fever in Nigeria, and in 1926 and 1928 he visited 
the West African Coast. He established the fact that the origin and pathology of 
the dread disease were the same on both sides of the Atlantic. Although he avoided 
a yellow fever infection, he almost died from a severe attack of tropical malaria. 
Though his robust constitution carried him through this peril, he was permanently 
weakened in health. He carried on his teaching, his investigations, his supervision 
of the researches of those working under him till within a few days of his death. 
With indomitable spirit he gave his last lecture sitting in his chair, and the subject 
was the disease of which he was dying. He suffered in silence; and his example 
will be a great challenge to those who come after him. 

In 1934 he went to Utrecht in Holland as one of two Canadian representatives 
to the Congress of Geographic Pathologists and took part in a symposium on arterio- 
sclerosis. Innumerable papers stand to his credit on various pathological conditions, 
all of them marked by clarity, conciseness and strict scientific accuracy in both 
observation and exposition. But his world fame rests especially on his work on 
arterio-sclerosis and diseases of the arteries, and on yellow fever. 

As late as 1935 he held the presidency of the Toronto Academy of Medicine 
and exercised a stimulating influence on all its medical and scientific acti\aties. He 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROMO FOR 1937 



was elected fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1928; he was a member of 
the National Reseach Council of Canada, of the Royal College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Canada, of the Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland, of 
the American Association of Pathologists and Bacteriologists (in 1919, President), 
of the American Society of Tropical Medicine, of the Society of Experimental 
Biology and Medicine, of the Society of Experimental Pathology (in 1935, President) , 
of the Association of Medical Museums ( President 1919 I , and of the International 
Society and the American Association for the History of Medicine. The mention 
of these connections shows how wide were his scientific interests, how highly he 
was esteemed in the world of research, and what prestige he brought to this 
University by his writings, his investigations, and his force of personality. 

In teaching he went to the heart of the subject and insistently demanded accuracy 
in observation and in statement. He was the very embodiment of the spirit of 
research — a man who worked untiringly to discover the causes of things, in scorn 
of material reward. I trust that his library, remarkable both for its volumes on 
the history of medicine and for its wide range in pathology, will be kept together 
and acquired by the Academy of Medicine and the University of Toronto. 

Dr. Frederick William Marlow after a gallant and extended fight against a 
heart condition died suddenly on August 22. 1936. He was a graduate of Trinity 
Medical School, holding the degree of M.D., CM. and became a member of the 
medical staff of the University of Toronto on the union of the colleges. He was 
a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and for many years was 
associate professor of gynaecology in this institution. During the War he organised 
the medical services in this military district. The esteem in which his confreres 
held him is witnessed by his election to the presidency of the Academy of Medicine 
and of the Ontario Medical Association. 

Dr. George Herbert Locke, the chief librarian of the Toronto Public Library 
since 1908, was also on the staff of our Library School. He passed away on 
January 28, 1937, amid universal regret. 

Graduating from this University (a member of Victoria College) as B.A. in 1893, 
B. Paed. and M.A. in 1896, he gave instruction in the history and methods of 
teaching in the Universities of Harvard and Chicago (being from 1903-.5 Dean of 
the College of Education, Chicago ) and was dean of the School of Education, 
Macdonald College, McGill University. From this post he was called to the chief 
librarianship in Toronto. In 1927, when he was president of the American library 
Association, he received from Toronto the honorary degree of LL.D. He had much 
to do with the founding of the Library School — carried on in the Ontario College 
of Education — and was one of its most valued and inspiring lecturers. To him 
the Arts Colleges of this University owe the Carnegie grants of 815,000 for their 
undergraduate libraries. 

Dr. J. Edgar Bates died of a sudden heart attack on February 21st. A graduate 
of McMaster Lniversity in Arts and of Toronto in Medicine, he lectured in pathology 
for the past twelve years and was counted among the most promising of the younger 
pathologists. 

On May 6th Walter Herbert Williams for about twentv years senior modern 
language master in the University of Toronto Schools, died in his .56th year. He 
had been a teacher in Kitchener Collegiate Institue for fourteen vears before he 
came in 1917 to the Lniversity Schools. He was a stimulating and kindly teacher. 

Dr. Malcolm Maclachlan Crawford, the chief coroner of Toronto since 1926, 
and lecturer in medical jurisprudence in our medical faculty, died on the 14th of 
May. He graduated in medicine from this Lniversity in 1893 and did postgraduate 
work at Johns Hopkins. His wide experience and rich human svmpathy enabled 
him to "execute justice with mercy" (as the King's coronation oath expresses it) 
and to give to our students both wise instruction about criminal investigations 
and a heart of kindliness to those in distress. 

On November 14th, 1936, Mr. Richard J. Hamilton, B.A.. manager of the 
University Press, passed away in his 66th year. Though troubled with diabetes 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



for some vears he was seriously ill for only two weeks before his death. In 1904 
he opened a university bookstore in the library building. This grew to large pro- 
portions in the course of years. Out of this undertaking came a University Press 
which did printing for the various departments of the University and also in due 
time published the Historical Review, the University Quarterly, the Journal of 
Political Science, the Law Journal, the Varsity, the University Monthly, the University 
Studies, and various scientific and literary books, written mainly by members of 
the university staff. 

Since 1908 Mr. Hamilton has been manager of the Press. In 1933 the University 
took over the bookstore and Mr. Hamilton managed the whole undertaking, with 
its three departments of printing, publishing and book-selling. During his manage- 
ment the present Press Building was erected and equipped and a substantial reserve 
fund was established. Mr. Hamilton's whole life and interest were devoted to 
the development of the Press and the Book Shop. 

The Universitv lost a faithful and efficient servant in the person of Miss Harriet 
Mulholland Latter, since 1916 the secretary of the department of University Exten- 
sion. A graduate of this University in 1904. with honours in modern languages, 
she served as a missionary in China. Some time after her return to Canada, owing 
to illness in her family, she was appointed to the staff of the Extension Department. 
Here she did a fine piece of work, giving personal advice and guidance to those 
who were enrolled in the Teachers" Course, and to all who sought information 
about the manifold activities of this varied and ever growing branch of university 
work. 

The Board of Governors will keenly miss the presence and advice of their 
fellow-governor. Dr. F. W. Merchant, who passed away on the 29th January. His 
ripe experience as a teacher and educational administrator made hime a wise 
counsellor both on the academic and on the financial side of the Board's work. 

The following members of the staff retired under the age limit: 

Brig.-Gen. G. S. Cartwright, C.B., C.M.G.. director, department of military 
studies; W. Lash Miller, C.B.E., B.A., Ph.D., (Munich), professor of physical 
chemistry; E. J. Urwick. M.A., (Ox.), professor of economics and director of social 
science; A. N. Scarrow. lecturer, manual training. Ontario College of Education; 
Charles F. Heebner, Dean of the Ontario College of Pharmacy. 

The inevitable passing of the years and the pension rules of the University 
make it necessary that even some of our most distinguished members of the teaching 
staff must retire from active lecturing. Some of them, happily, continue to carry 
on researches which the load of teaching made it difficult for them to pursue. 

General George Strachan Cartwright, after a distinguished career in India and 
on the Western Front, as a member of the Royal Engineers, was appointed Director 
of Military Studies in the University of Toronto in 1927. in succession to Colonel 
W. R. Lang. His experience in all parts of the world has given vividness to his 
lectures, while his sterling character has won him the respect of successive gener- 
ations of members of the C.O.T.C. He retired from his instructional work at the 
end of June 1937. 

Professor William Lash Miller has given his whole life to this University. 
Graduating in 1887, he went to Germany where chemical studies held a foremost 
place in his postgraduate work, and at the University of Munich he won his Ph.D. 
in 1890. After serving in the department of chemistry on his return from Germany, 
he was made professor of physical chemistry in 1907. and ultimately head of this 
great and growing department. He was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of 
Canada and in 1935 became its president. As president and in recognition of his 
researches in the field of yeasts he was made C.B.E. He has steadily published 
scientific papers containing the results of his investigations and those of his students. 
His fame abroad is evidenced by his choice to be an honorary member of the 
American Chemical Society, the Electro-Chemical Society, and the American Electro- 
platers Association. He managed a vast department in this L^niversity with energy 
and economy. For years he has urged upon the Board of Governors the vital 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



importance of extending the present chemical buildings and equipment and of 
seeking to co-ordinate the chemical teaching throughout the whole University. 
He was a stimulating teacher and a singularly forceful personality. 

Edward Johns Urwick. the son of a famous Congregational Divine in England, 
came to Canada after his retirement from important academic posts in London — 
the directorship of the London School of Sociology 1902-10, and professor of 
social philosophy in the University of London from 1912-22. He was vice-president 
of the Sociological Society of England and a member of the Poor Law Guardians 
of London from 1896 to 1902. \^Tiile in England he published "Studies of Bov 
Life in Great Cities" 1903. "Luxury and Waste" 1906. "A Philosophv of Social 
Progress" 1909. and "The Message of Plato" 1920 (which traced connections 
between the teachings of Indian sages and Plato ) . 

In 1929, in succession to Professor R. M. Maclver, who went to a chair in 
Columbia University. New York, he was appointed head of the department of 
Political Science and economics in this University and acting director of the depart- 
ment of Social Science. His admirable volume "The Social Good" was also published 
in 1927. Professor Urwick has taken a leading part in all matters of social welfare 
in the City of Toronto, most notably in housing . He has been chosen chairman 
of the recently organised Toronto Welfare Council. 

He has been largely instrumental in organising and carrying through the 
honour course in sociology, leading to the degree of B.A. Graduates in this depart- 
ment enter on the specific course in the department of social science, combining 
thereby the theoretical and scientific basis with the practical application to actual 
social problems. I am glad to say that we shall still have the benefit of Professor 
Lerwick's services in sociology, given gratuitously and of his ripe experience in 
public welfare movements. 

Mr. A. N. Scarrow since 1910 has been on the staff of the Lniversitv Schools 
and of the Faculty of Education till his retirement in June 1937, as lecturer in 
manual training. This veteran schoolmaster was much beloved by colleagues and 
pupils. A man of simplicity and sincerity, he taught his students to loathe all that 
was mean and petty and to develop their intellectual and emotional characters. 

Charles Frederick Heebner retired from the deanship of the affiliated College 
of Pharmacy last June. Since 1891 he has presided over the destinies of that 
institution. Well-trained in Columbia University, New York, in the Universitv 
of the City of New York, and as the chief chemist of the Pharmaceutical Labora- 
tory of Lazell and Dalley. he came to Toronto in 1891. Since that date he has 
been professor of pharmacy, prescriptions and dispensing, as well as Dean. His 
outstanding books are "A manual of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Chemistry" 
1887. and " Synopsis of British Pharmacopoeia and Canadian Attendum Prepar- 
ations" 1935. L nder him the College of Pnarmacy has come into closer relations 
with the University. Its students are being taught by the University the subjects of 
botany, pharmacology and chemistry. Careful consideration is now being given 
both by the Council of the College of Pharmacy and by the L niversity to the raising 
of standards and the lengthening of the course. 

The following resigned their positions: 

T. L. Walker. M.A. (Qu. ), Ph.D. iLeip. ). professor of mineralogy and director 
of the mineralogical laboratories: H. J. Davis, M.A. (Ox. I. professor of English: 
L. Irving, A.B. ( Bowdoin I , A.M. (Harv. ), Ph.D. (Stanford), professor of experi- 
mental biology; R. G. McLean, D.D.S.. professor of dental praxis; Miss A. L. Laird. 
M.Sc. ( Drex. I . professor of household science; W. M. Drummond. B.A. (Qu. i. 
M.A., assistant professor of political economy; Wallace A. Scott, C.M.G.. B.A.. M.D.. 
assistant professor of surgery; W. W. Jones, B.A., M.B.. assistant professor of 
surgery; M. H. Roepke. B.S.' (Kansas I. M.S. I 111. I, M.A. (Tor.). Ph.D. (Min.l. 
Lecturer in pharmacology: E. C. Beck. B.S.A., M.A. lecturer in botany; P. A. T. 
Sneath. M.D.. D.P.H.. lecturer in hygiene. 

After a period of ill-health, due to a coronary thrombosis. Dr. Thomas Leonard 
Walker has resigned. After graduating from Queen's Universit\ in 1890, he studied 



10 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

abroad at the Universities of Leipzig (where in 1895 he received his Ph.D.) and 
Heidelberg. Then he went to India, where from 1897-1902 he was assistant super- 
intendent of the Geological Survey of India; in 1898 he lectured in geology in the 
Presidencv College of Calcutta. \^Tiile he worked in India, he made a scientific 
expedition across the high passes of the Himalayas into Tibet. In 1901 he was 
appointed professor of mineralogy and petrography in the University of Toronto, 
and held that chair until his retirement at the end of the academic year in June 1937. 
He was an excellent teacher and leader in research. For thirty-five years he 
represented his department to successive generations of students and left a deep 
mark on mineralogical studies in Canada. In 1914 he published his famous book 
on "Crvstallography" and almost every year contributed papers to the scientific 
journals of the Continent. He has sealed his long career in this University by 
presenting to his department his wonderful collection of over 5000 mineralogical 
pamphlets. 

Herbert John Davis, a B.A. of Oxford University (St. John's College) and a 
fine soldier during the Great War, lectured in the University of Leeds in 1920, and 
came to us in 1922 as an associate professor of English in University College. He 
was made a full professor in 1935. In 1924-5 he was a guest professor in English 
at the University of Cologne. In 1935 he edited "The Drapier's Letters" by Jonathan 
Swift. He has also written "Swift's View of Poetry" and various articles and 
reviews, mainly on eighteenth century and modern literature. We have found it 
hard to hold him on our staff in face of flattering offers that have come to him 
from famous universities across the line. This year he accepted a chair of English 
in Cornell L^niversity. His founding of an exchange fellowship in this University 
is referred to more fully in the Report of the Principal of University College. 

Professor Davis was a stimulating teacher and leader in research. We wish 
him all success in his new sphere of work. Members of our staff who join the staff 
of other universities are links of goodwill among the confraternity of Universities 
in Canada and abroad. 

Dr. Lawrence Irving came to us in 1927 as associate professor of physiology. 
He was a M.A. of Harvard and Ph.D. of Stanford. After seven years with Professor 
Best he was transferred to the department of biology, as professor of experimental 
biolog). He was a stimulating leader in research. For him the Hoskin Laboratory 
was fitted up with the best equipment for the development of this work. At the 
end of this academic year he left to become head of the department of biology in 
Swarthmore College. I am glad to say that a suitable successor has been found in one 
of his old pupils in this University, Dr. Kenneth Fisher, who returns to us after 
holding a biological professorship in the University of Maine. The work so well 
begun by Professor Irving will be carried forward by Professor Fisher. 
Dr. R. Gordon McLean was for many years a member of the Council of the Roval 
College of Dental Surgeons. After the Dental College became a faculty of this 
University, Dr. McLean was appointed in 1932 as associate in dentistry, and next 
year professor of dental praxis. He retired this year and removed to the Island 
of Jersey. 

William Malcolm Drummond, a B. A. of Queen's University and a M. A. of 
Toronto, was appointed a lecturer in economics in 1929, and an assistant professor 
in 1930. His special field was rural economics. The Minister of Agriculture. Hon. 
Duncan Marshall, fell that Professor Drummond would be more strategically placed 
in the Ontario Agricultural College at Guelph than here in Toronto. This transfer 
was made at the end of this college year. Professor Drummond will prob'^bly 
continue to give some lectures in his special subjects to our students in economics. 
He was an excellent instructor. 

Colonel Wallace Arthur Scott graduated from this University as a B.A. in 1895; 
M.D. in 1898; served in King's College Hospital London 1902-4. During the Great 
War he held high command in the Canadian Army Medical Corps and received 
the C.M.G. in 19l8. He is a fellow of the Royal College of Surgeons, England. He 
was an associate in surgery and clinical surgery on our medical staff, being asso- 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 11 

ciated with St. Michael's Hospital. He was a brilliant surgeon and an excellent 
teacher. For his services to students while a member of our medical faculty we 
express to him our hearty thanks. 

William Warner Jones has served on our medical staff for thirty years. In 1907 
he was appointed as assistant demonstrator in anatomy. In 1908 he was placed 
on the surgical staff, serving successively as demonstrator, associate and assistant 
professor. This year he retired, followed by the high esteem of colleagues and 
students. 

All these members of the staff have given the best energies of their lives to the 
University and its students. We are profoundly and sincerely grateful for their 
services. 

Leave of absence was granted to: 

For the session: J. G. FitzGerald, M.D., LL.D., director, school of hygiene, and 
professor of hygiene; T. L. Walker, M.A. (Qu. ), Ph.D. (Leip.), professor of min- 
eralogy and director of mineralogical laboratories; G. Oswald Smith, M.A. (Ox.), 
professor of Latin; W. R. Taylor, M.A., Ph.D., D.D. (Qu.), professor of semitics; 
Wallace A. Scott, C.M.G., B.x\., M.D., assistant professor of surgery; C. C. Lucas, 
M.A.Sc. (B.C.). Ph.D., assistant professor, medical research — Banting; G. A. Cline, 
D.S.O., M.A.. instructor in University Schools; W. H. Williams, M. A. (Qu.), 
B. Paed., instructor in University Schools. 

For one term: F. V. Winnett, M.A., Ph. D., assistant professor in semitics; 
H. Grayson Smith, B.A., Ph.D., assistant professor in physics. 

The following new appointments and promotions were made during the year: 

In the Faculty of Arts: — Appointments: S. Beatty, M.A., Ph.D., dean; Barker 
Fairley, M.A. (Leeds), Ph.D. (Jena), professor of German; G. L. Assie, L. es L., 
Dip et Sup. Paris, Lecturer in French; A. E. Birney, B.A. (B.C.), M.A., Ph.D., 
lecturer in English; P. Brieger. Ph.D. (Bres. ), lecturer in fine art; J. M. Gage, M.A.. 
LL.B., lecturer in law; J. F. Heard, B.A., (West.), M.A. (McG.), Ph.D. (McG. and 
London), lecturer in astronomy; R. A. Preston, M.A. (Leeds), Ph.D. (Yale), lecturer 
in history; J. Satterly, M.A., Ph.D. (Camb.), lecturer in geology; F. E. W. Wetmore, 
B.Sc. (N.B. ), M.A., lecurer in chemistry 

Promotions: — F. C. Auld. B.A. (McG.), M.A.. B.C.L. (Ox.), from an ossociate- 
professorship to a professorship in Roman law and jurisprudense; H. A. Innis. 
M.A. ( McM. ) , Ph.D. ( Chic. ) , from an associate-professorship to a professorship in 
political economy; T. F. Mcllwraith, M.A. (Camb.), from an associate-professorship 
to a professorship in anthropology; H. L. Humphreys, A.B. (Mich.), A.M. (Princ), 
Ph.D. (Col.) from an assistant professorship to an associate-professorship in French; 
H. S. M. Coxeter, B.A., Ph.D. (Cam.) from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship 
in mathematics; C. W. M. Hart, M.A. (Syd.) from a lectureship to an assistant-pro- 
fessorship in anthopology; F. S. Hogg, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. (Harv. ) from a lectureship 
to an assistant-professorship in astronomy. 

In the Faculty of Medicine: — Appointments: W. E. Gallic, M.D.. dean; D. \. 
Solant, M.A., M.D., Ph.D. (Lond.), assistant professor in physiology; E. H. Bot- 
terell, M.D. (Man.), lecturer in physiology; B. F. Crocker, M.A., lecturer in bio- 
chemistry. 

Promotions: — G. F. Marrian, D.Sc. (Lond.) from an associate-professorship 
to a professorship in biochemistry; T. F. Nicholson, M.B., B.Sc. (Med.), Ph.D., from 
an assistant-professorship to an associate-professorship in pathological chemistry; 
Miss F. H. Fraser, B.A., M.B., from a lectureship to an assistant professorship in 
hygiene; H. K. Detweiler. M.D., from an associateship to an assistant-professorship 
in medicine; T. A. J. Duff, M.B., from an associateship to an assistant-professorship 
in surgery; Wallace A. Scott, C.M.G., B.A., M.D., from an associateship to an assist- 
ant-professorship in surgery; J. Chaigie, M.B., Ch.B., Ph.D., D.P.H. (St. And.) 
from a lectureship to an assistant-professorship in Epidemiology. 

In the Faculty of Applied Science: — Promotions: A. Wardell, B.A.Sc, from a 
lectureship to an assistant-professorship in engineering drawing. 



12 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

In the Faculty of Dentistry: — Appointments: A. D. A. Mason, D.D.S., dean; 
D. M. Tanner. D.D.S., associate in dentistry. 

Promotions: — R. G. Ellis. B.D.S. (Adel.l, D.D.S., B.Sc. (Dent. I from an associ- 
ateship to an associate-professorship in dentistry; R. J. Godfrey, D.D.S., from an 
associateship to an associate-professorship in dentistry. 

In the Faculty of Household Science: — Appointment: Miss J. Brodie, B.A., 
A.M., Ph.D. ( Col. I , professor of household science. 

In the School of Nursing: — Appointment: Miss N.D. Fidler, lecturer. 

In the Department of Social Science: — Appointment: A. E. Grauer, B.A. (B.C.) 
(Ox. I, Ph.D. (Cal.l from an assistant-professorship to an associate-professorship. 

In the Ontario College of Education: — Appointment: M. A. Cameron, M.A. 
(B.C.). Ph.D. (Tor. I. assistant professor in educational research. 

Promotion: — W. J. Lougheed. M.A., B. Paed. from an associate-professorship 
to a professorship in mathematics. 

In Medical Research — Banting:— Appointment : G. E. Hall, M.S.A., M.D.. Ph.D., 
cissistant professor. 

Honours were conferred upon members of the staff: 

Dr. A. P. Coleman, emeritus professor of geology, received the Penrose medal 
of the Geological Society of America, in recognition of eminent research in pure 
geology and of outstanding original contributions which mark a decided advance 
in the science of geology; Dr. W. E. Gallic, professor of surgery and dean of the 
faculty of medicine, was invited to be honorary surgeon-in-chief for a week by the 
New York Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled; Dr. G. S. Young, special lecturer 
in medical ethics and economics, was reelected chairman of the Council of the 
Canadian Medical Association; Sir Ernest MacMillan. dean of the faculty of music; 
was invited to act as adjudicator at the Royal National Eisteddfod, Wales; was 
tendered a civic reception by the Mayor and Corporation of Montreal on the 
occasion of his visit as guest conductor of one of "Les Concerts Symphoniques de 
Montreal"; was elected one of the Vice-Presidents of the Royal College of Organists 
of London. England; Professor J. Finkelman, department of law, has been appointed 
impartial chairman of the Toronto Men's Clothing Industry under the terms of 
an agreement between the employers and the employees; Professor E. Arthur, 
school of architecture, was awarded the gold medal of the Royal Architectural 
Institute; Professor H. E. T. Haultain. department of mining engineering, was 
awarded the Randolf Bruce Gold Medal, in recognition of his efforts in solving 
the problem of what happens to different types of rocks when ground up by the 
impact of steel balls or tubes in revolving mills used in ore reduction, thus enabling 
recovery of largest possible proportion of valuable metallic contents; Professor 
H. J. Davis of the department of English. University College, has been appointed 
Frederic Iver Carpenter visiting professor at the I niversity of Chicago; Dr. Bernard 
Haurwitz, department of physics, has been appointed a research associate at the 
Blue Hill Observatory; Professor T. J. Meek, department of Semitics, University 
College, has been elected Chairman of the Library Committee of the American 
Schools of Oriental Research; also elected a member of the Semi-centennial com- 
mittee of scholars and educators of the Jewish Theological Seminary. New York, 
and Vice-President of the Mid-West Branch of the Society of Biblical Literature; 
Dr. E. F. Burton, professor of physics, was chosen Vice-President of the "Premiere 
Commission du International Institut du Froid'", and appointed a member of the 
National Research Council at Ottawa; A. G. Huntsman, professor of marine biology, 
was elected president of the Royal Society of Canada; Dr. C. H. Best, professor of 
physiology, was elected president of the Canadian Physiological Society; Dr. A. A. 
Fletcher, associate in medicine, was elected president of the Canadian Rheumatic 
Disease Association; Dr. J. H. Elliott, professor of the history of medicine, was 
elected a member of the Council of the American Association of the History of 
Medicine; Professor R. W. Angus, department of mechanical engineering, was elected 
an honorary member of the Engineering Institute of Canada; Professor W. P. M. 
Kennedy, department of law, has been appointed foreign correspondent of the 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 13 

Amjerican Society of Arbitration Law; Professor F. C. Auld. department of law. has 
been appointed a research assistant in Arbitration Law of the American Society of 
Arbitration Law; Dr. A. R. Gordon, associate professor of chemistry, was elected 
a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada; Professor C. N. Cochrane, department of 
ancient history, was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada; D. C. B. Farrar, 
department of psvchiatrv. was elected an honorary member of the Verein fiir Ange- 
wandte Psvchopathologie und Psychologic (Vienna), and a corresponding member 
of the Verein fiir Psychiatric und Neurologic ( Vienna ) . 

As the efficiency of the University depends on the charter, training and ability 
of the staff, everv care is taken to fill vacancies and make additions by securing men 
of scholarship, teaching power, aptitude for research, and fine personality. Among 
those who have been appointed to carry on work for the session 1937-38 are the 
following: — 

In succession to Dr. Oskar Klotz. the Board has chosen for the important chair 
of pathology, Dr. William Boyd of the L^niversity of Manitoba. — a brother-in-law of 
Dr. J. C. B. Grant, our professor of anatomy. From the L^niversity of Edinburgh 
he graduated in 1908 as MB.. Ch.B.: in 1911 he took his M.D. — his thesis for this 
was on the cerebro-spinal fluid. In the same year he took his M.R.C.P. Edin. and 
his diploma in psychiatry. He served "with a field ambulance at \ pres" in 1914-15. 
Thereafter he came to Winnipeg to be the first full-time professor of pathology in 
the Universitv of Manitoba in 1915; and in 1919 was appointed pathologist to the 
Winnipeg General Hospital. His teaching and his pathological and clinical experience 
were amicably and constructively combined. Amid his heavy duties he found time 
to write three volumes widely used in medical colleges of this continent; a "surgical 
pathologv". now in its third edition; a "pathology of internal diseases", now in its 
second edition; and a "text book of pathology", now in its second edition. A 
colleague has described these books as marked by "untraditional treatment, lucid 
and picturesque expression, brevity and completeness without being exhaustive, and 
by original and beautiful illustrations". In February his last book appeared, "An 
Introduction to Medical Science", giving to beginners a panoramic view of the 
subject. 

He is a most interesting, stimulating and co-operative teacher. Universities in 
Great Britain and Ireland. Africa and the United States and our own Dominion 
have sought him for their chair of pathology. We are fortunate indeed that he has 
accepted our invitation to come to Toronto. 

In 1932 he was made a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of London, 
and in 1934 was elected president of the American Association of Pathologists and 
Bacteriologists. 

It is worthv of note that among the favourite text-books in pathology, anatomy 
and phvsiology used in the medical schools of America are those written by the heads 
of these departments in our Faculty of Medicine. 

The department of Political Science has been strengthened by the addition of 
Dr. Robert Macgregor Dawson, professor of political science in the Lniversity of 
Saskatchewan since 1928. He graduated from Dalhousie Lniversity in 1915; took 
his A.M. from Harvard in 1917; his M. Sc. in 1921 and his D.Sc. in 1922 from 
the University of London. 

He taught in Dalhousie, in Pittsburgh and in Rutgers before going to Saskatch- 
ewan. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He has written several 
valuable volumes on public administration, such as "The Civil Service of Canada", 
"Constitutional Issues in Canada" and just recently "Development of Dominion Status 
1900-1936". We look forward to definite advances in our courses in public admin- 
istration both in the senior and undergraduate years and in the School of Graduate 
Studies. 

Professor Rouillard comes to us from Amherst College to be a member of our 
French Department in University College. He is an authority on the life and writings 
of La Fontaine; he thus adds to our strength on the literary side of French studies. 



14 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The work done by the late Professor W. A. Parks has been divided. Dr. George 
Langford becomes professor of mining geology. One of our own graduates in 
Applied Science, he went to Cornell University where he obtained his Ph.D. in 
geology and gave lectures in that field. For the past seven years he has been the 
geologist of the Alclntyre Mine. He has thus had a wide experience in the applica- 
tion of geology to mining. He will be able to make a special contribution to the 
new course in Mining Geology. 

Dr. Loris Russell, trained in Alberta and in Princton Universities and for some 
years in the Geological Survey of Canada, will have charge of vertebrate palaeont- 
ology. He has been a member of various expeditions to the Canadian West in 
search of dinosaurs. He will thus be able to maintain and carry on the magnificienl 
work accomplished by Dr. Parks. 

Dr. Fritz of our present staff will have charge of the invertebrate palaeontology. 

The resignation of Professor T. U. Walker in mineralogy left a vacancy hard 
to fill. At last the Board appointed Dr. Martin Alfred Peacock of Harvard Univers- 
ity to be associate professor of mineralogy and petrography. He graduated from 
Glasgow in 1922, and subsequently received his Ph.D. from Harvard, and his D.Sc. 
from Glasgow. One of the greatest tributes that could be paid to a scholar in his 
field was paid him when the American Mineralogical Society chose him to revise 
the famous standard text-book, Dana's Mineralogy. Incidently Dr. Peacock is a 
Licentiate of the Royal Academy of Music in London. 

The growing work of teaching and of museum administration in anthropology 
has made it necessary to secure assistance for Professor Mcllwraith. Dr. Nash of 
the department of anthropology in the University of Chicago has been appointed a 
lecturer. 

Dr. Nash has had experience in exploring and excavating Indian mounds in 
the Mississippi Valley, and this should qualify him to conduct similar scientific 
investigations into Indian mounds in this country. 

We have taken a great step forward in appointing Dr. Hermann Fischer, to 
be a research professor of organic chemistry. The son of one of the most famous 
of modern chemists, Dr. Emil Fischer of Berlin, he is himself one of the outstanding 
leaders in this field. He left the University of Berlin in 1933 and has been professor 
of organic chemistry in the University of Basel, Switzerland. In the winter he 
visited this continent, and many of its universities, including our own. 

He looked favourably on the invitation to become a research professor on our 
staff. His salarv was generously provided for ten years by a friend of the University. 
The well-known chemist. Dr. Dakin, stated to me in a letter that if Professor Fischer 
could be induced to settle in Canada, he would make a most valuable contribution 
to chemical research on the whole continent. 

The University in General 

I am glad to have obtained from former Governors-General who have received 
the degree of LL.D. honoris causa from this University signed photographs of them- 
selves and their wives. These were most cheerfully given. We had those of Earl 
and Countess Grey and Lord and Lady Tweedsmuir. We have now added to our 
collection the portraits of the Duke and Duchess of Connaught, the Duke and Dutch- 
ess of Devonshire, Lord and Lady Byng. Lord and Lady Willingdon and Lord and 
Lady Bessborough. These now hang on the wall in the upper story of Simcoe Hall. 

Sir Richard Livingstone, the President of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, also 
one of our honorary graduates, sent me a stone owl from his college, removed during 
alterations, as both a symbal of that wisdom which all colleges seek to impart and 
as a visible link between a university in Canada and the mother-university of the 
English-speaking world. 

At the Canadian National Exhibition an admirable display was made by this 
LIniversity and the Royal Ontario Museum. Numerous charts were prepared to 
illustrate the size of the University and the nature of the work it is seeking to do. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 15 

To. Mr. W. J. Dunlop of the University Extension Department we were indebted 
for this visible linking of the University to the general life of our Province, and 
especially to the Secondary and Elementary Schools, 

We place on record our good wishes to our federated university, Victoria, on the 
celebration of its centenary. This was graced by the presence of Lord Tweedsmuir 
and many generations of old time students. Honorary degrees were conferred in 
Convocation Hall the most notable of these being a doctorate in divinity given to 
the Governor-General himself. 

We congratulate St. Michaels College on the formal opening of its new build- 
ings, which house its Institute of Mediaeval Studies. 

The School of Library Science was inspected by Mr. Metcalf of New York and 
Miss Walsh of Ann Arbor with a view to its being accredited by the American 
Library Association. This rating has been made. In their report they suggest a 
site for the School nearer to the Central Public Library and to the University Library, 
and urge attention to the content of books as well as to the technique of handling 
them. 

The Faculty of Arts 

One of the outstanding events of the year was the Physics Institute held in 
February by our department of physics and centring around the person of a distin- 
guished visitor, Dr. Niels Bohr of Copenhagen, one of the foremost phyicists of 
the world. Professors of physics came from the Universities of Cornell, Princeton, 
Chicago, Johns Hopkins. Wisconsin, Harvard, Rochester, McGill, Queen's, McMaster 
and Western. The subjects discussed are mentioned elsewhere in this Report. All 
who attended — including our own large staff, our graduate students, and our senior 
students — received a great mental stimulus. To Professor E. F. Burton, head of 
our own department of physics, is due the brilliant suggestion of holding such a 
conference. 

The students aided by the staff in biology and botany held their triennial con- 
versazione. Thousands attended the two buildings and had a notion of the broad 
field embraced by these sciences and of the manifold activities of those engaged 
in the work. 

A new honour department in music has been approved by the Senate and the 
Board of Governors. One-third of this is strictly musical, the rest embraces other 
subjects of broad cultural value. Such a course leads to the degree of Bachelor of 
Arts. It will help to equip those who wish to teach music as well as other sujects 
in the Secondary Schools, and will further provide an excellent course of study in 
the liberal arts. 

The new department of geography under Professor Griffith Taylor is very 
popular. Over two hundred enrolled in the first vear. This number has taxed the 
strength of Professor Taylor and made necessary the appointment of demonstrators. 
More space will be required for next year's class. 

Perhaps the most urgent need in this Faculty is larger accommodation for 
chemistry. Chemistry is now being taught in class-rooms scattered over the campus. 
Its teaching should be consolidated in one ample and well-equipped central building. 
Wings could be added to the present building (erected in 1892), a quadrangle 
completed, the old building re-conditioned, and the equipment of the whole brought 
up to date — ^if the necessary money were forthcoming. This should be our next 
step forward. 

Portraits of the late Dean F. B. Allan and of the late Professor W. A. Parks 
have been presented to the University. 

The course in the College of Optometry has been lengthened from two to three 
years. The students are registered as occasional students in the University and 
receive instruction in such subjects as physics (especially optics), physiology and 
anatomy. 

Dean Beatty in his report strikes a note of warning against over-working students 
and not giving them time enough to read and think. He writes: "There is always 



16 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

a tendency to increase the content and complexity of courses, and to grow less and 
less aware of the difficulties of students". We can trust the Faculty Council to 
hold this tendency in proper control. 

The four colleges in this Faculty have instituted a Dramatic Contest, held in 
Hart House Theatre. The trophy awarded for first place is presented by myself 
and is an illuminated vellum certificate, prepared by Mr. Scott Carter. 

The adoption of senior matriculation as the requirement for entrance into the 
University continues to secure more maturity and more preparation on the part of 
the student. In the first year the student must adjust himself to the university 
method of work, he must become more responsible for himself. In consequence 
there will probably be more failures in examinations at the end of the first year 
than in anv other vear of the course. Between the years 1920 and 1930 there was 
a rise in failure percentage and a rapid decline since that date. In 1920 there were 
failures of 34 per cent.; in 1930 of 27 per cent.; in 1936, of 16 per cent. 

The system of honor recommendation from the Secondary Schools seems to 
be working well. There is no indication of an increase of failures in the University 
in consequence of this change. 

The proposed new curriculum for the Secondary Schools has an immediate 
bearing on university standards of entrance. To the new problems presented most 
careful consideration will be given by representatives of the Universities, the Schools, 
and the Department of Education. 

At the Reception given by my wife and myself to all the members of the 
university staff and their wives, the guests of honour were the Lieutenant-Governor 
and Mrs. Bruce. Nearly eleven hundred were present. The University could 
realise its unity. For such a function the Royal Ontario Museum is a superb setting. 
I am grateful to the Trustees of the Museum for allowing us to use it. 

Faculty of Medicine 

\^ ilh deep thankfulness we record the continuance through another five years 
of the munificent Eaton gift for the maintenance of the Sir John and Lady Eaton 
Chair of Medicine. Medicine and paediatrics share this benefaction, and by means 
of it have made a splendid contribution to both the clinical and research sides of 
these departments. 

Microbiology has been transferred from botany to hygiene and preventive 
medicine. 

During Dr. FitzGerald's absence, the Connaught Laboratories have been in 
charge of Drs. Best and Defries. The report of the work now in progress is most 
heartening. After his year's investigation of methods of teaching preventive medicine 
in Europe and America, Dr. FitzGerald will return with still wider experience, which 
he will use to the furtherance of the teaching in this field. 

The Dean's report draws attention to the raising of standards in the first year 
and to the use of aptitude tests for determining what students are most suitable 
candidates for the medical profession. I commend to your attention the researches 
now in process on the use of Heparin, to prevent blood clotting, and on the best 
method of fighting silicosis in the mines. 

The new protamine-zinc-insulin. which prolongs the effects of the injection is now 
on the market and is being sold over the whole continent. 

Medical problems to-day must be faced and solved by co-operative effort. In 
our University such co-operation is the characteristic of all research work. Sir 
Frederick Banting's department of medical research is giving aid to whatever de- 
partment or individual seeks its help. 

A committee of the Faculty is passing the whole curriculum under review, 
in order to modify and improve it, as experience or new demands may require. 

The department of medical research has so grown that two stories should be 
added to the present Banting Institute. Among recent workers here is Dr. Bruno 
Mendel, formerly of Germany, who is investigating some of the biochemical problems 
of cancer. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 17 

In the department of paediatrics in the Sick Children's Hospital there was 
opened in January 1937 a division called Psychological Medicine. At its inaug- 
uration Dr. Edwards Park, professor of paediatrics at Johns Hopkins University 
and Dr. Leo Kanner. associate professor of psychology in the same university, gave 
addresses in which they related their experiences in the clinic at Johns Hopkins. 
This new clinic in Toronto breaks new ground in Canada. It will be devoted to 
the studv of the problems involved in the mental development and adjustment of 
the child — a most important phase of child welfare. 

It is significant that preventive medicine is becoming more and more a major 
subject in the medical curriculum. In all 164 medical men from all parts of Canada 
and abroad have taken our diploma of public health. We are thus training in our 
School of Hvgiene the leaders of public health throughout the Dominion. Important 
studies on nutrition in relation to health are being conducted by Dr. McHenry in 
the department of hygiene. 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 

An increasing attendance indicates improvement in the general conditions of 
Canada. Since the foundation sixty vears ago of the School of Practical Science, 
now merged into the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. 4425 have grad- 
uated, and of these probably 4000 are still living. 

The department of mechanical engineering needs an addition to its building, 
to provide space for the better teaching of hydraulic engineering. But additional 
accommodation is specially needed for chemical engineering. A new unit should 
be erected — probably immediately adjoining the present Chemical Building (some 
day I trust to be enlarged ) . Meanwhile additional and much needed equipment 
has been provided both for mechanical and chemical engineering. This equipment 
can e'^sily be removed to larger quarters, when such are provided. 

Internal rearrangements have been made in the Mining Building to give accom- 
modation to Professors Langford and Peacock in geology and mineralogy. 

A new course has been established, called "Mining Geology". It is designed 
to train geologists to co-operate with mining engineers in the mineral industry. 

It appears that more civil engineers will be needed to meet the country's re- 
quirements in the immediate future. 

In the School of Architecture there is an expansion of the course in housing 
and town-planning. A new course for sanitary engineers is being provided bv the 
co-operation of the Faculty of Engineering, the School of Hygiene, the department 
of biology and the Provincial Department of Health. 

This year's graduating class of 138 was promptly absorbed in employment. 

The School of Graduate Studies 

The special contribution which this University can make to advanced studies 
in Canada is in this field. I think that we shall be increasingly called upon to develop 
postgraduate instruction and to provide the laboratories and libraries needed for it. 
In addition to junior demonstratorships we should have many more fellowship 
than we have. 

Through a generous benefaction under the will of the late Colonel R. W. Leonard 
we have been able to establish six new fellowships of the value of S.500 each. Such 
fellowships make it possible not only for many able students to pursue higher studies, 
but also for students from various parts of Canada to come to a great centre of 
research in their own country. 

The number of students registered this year in the Graduate School is 637; 
of these 472 come from Ontario, 302 from Toronto, and elsewhere in the Province 
170. Fifty institutions are represented in the list of colleges from which these 
graduate students come. 

The excellence of the postgraduate work of a university largely determines 
its rank among the chief universities of the world. 



18 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Faculty of Forestry 

Once more there is an upward trend in attendance. The demand for well-trained 
foresters will increase. Of the seven men who graduated this year, each had at least 
two offers. 

The forest problems is one of Canada's major problems. Only our Govern- 
ments can give an adaquate lead to its solution. We have no illimitable forest 
resources. No material resources can be without limit; fire and folly have already 
limited our timber supplies. 

In co-operation with the department of biology, a course has been carried on 
for fish and game preservation; and a short intensive course has been given in the 
measuring and culling of sawlogs and pulpwood, as practised by the Department 
of Lands and Forests. 

Faculty of Dentistry 

There have been notable developments in dental research. It is hoped that the 
memories of the late Deans Webster and Seccombe will be perpetuated by the 
establishment of research scholarships or fellowships. 

University Extension 

The modern university does not stand apart from the community and its clamant 
needs. It seeks to distribute its intellectual treasures as widely as possible among 
those who wish to possess them. 

The department of extension provides the teachers' course, leading to a degree. 
In winter 653 were enrolled in classes conducted by regular members of the staff 
in the late afternoon and evening, and 542 attended the summer course. Evening 
tutorial classes were attended by 3725 adults. The total number of students who took 
continuous courses throughout the session was 7622. There has been for the last 
17 years a gradual increase in this group. Extension lectures have been attended 
by 33,597 persons. 

To the staff in physiotherapy as chief instructor Miss Rebecca Shilton, of the 
Swedish Institute. Cromwell Road, London, has been added. It is necessary to have 
an instructor with a certificate from the Chartered Society of Massage and Remedial 
Gymnastics in London, in order that our graduates may be given full recognition 
if and when they go to England for postgraduate study. 

Social Science 

Professor Urwick retires from the acting headship of this department and will 
be succeeded by Professor Grauer, who has been his colleague both in economics 
and social science. There should be much research work done in the social sciences 
in studying the relationships which enable men to live happily and helpfully together. 
Research applies not only to the physical sciences, but also to the social. We must 
advance along this line. No other university in Canada has a department of social 
science for the training of social workers; that is a task we must perform. But to 
the training of practical workers should be added the investigation of social problems. 
"A great and effectual door is opened" to us in this field. I hope that some day we 
may be able to add to our staff a research professor or lecturer, and so build on the 
good foundation already laid. 

School of Nursing and St. George's School 

The grants to these departments from the Rockefeller Foundation begin to 
diminish next year. Committees of the Board have been appointed to study the 
situation thereby created and report to the Board. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 19 

The Press 

Under Mr. Gordon Burns as acting manager, there has been much internal 
improvement in the building, and new equipment in the way of type, press, and 
binding machine has been purchased. This makes it possible for the Press to do 
more work and more satisfactory work both in the division of job-printing and in 
that of publishing books, periodicals, and studies. 

The Museum 

The detailed reports of the various directors are full of interest. The total 
attendance for the year ending 30th June 1937 was 289,428. It is being increasingly 
regarded as the Museum of the whole Province. 

The Library 

The congestion in our stack-room steadily increases. We need more room and 
more books, especially for graduate students. The total number of books in the 
library is 339,261 and of pamphlits 121,909— a total of 471,170. 

The number of books used by undergraduates has increased from 330,579 in 
1935-6 to 341.086 in 1936-7 — an increase of three per cent. 

The total circulation for staff, graduates and undergraduates has in the past 
ten years grown from 179,278 to 380,523. 

The Health Service 

Dr. George Porter states that out of 2097 men students examined, only 22 were 
found unfit for physical training. This is the best record we have yet had. The 
average height of the first year students is 5 feet 9Vi inches, and the average weight 
1431/4 lbs. — another best record. 

Dr. Edith Gordon's report on the health of the women students is satisfactory. 
Every physical test is applied to ensure an accurate diagnosis. The women are 
keenly looking forward to the erection of a women's gymnasium in the not distant 
future. 

Athletics and Student Activities 

The Senior Rugby Team won the championship in the intercollegiate series. 
The Queen's Team were worthy contestants to the very last. 

The new athletic fee, asked for by the students themselves, will make possible 
their attendance in much larger numbers at the Stadium, and will provide not only 
for the opening of the Gymnasium at night, but for the development of further 
recreational sports. 

The Students Administrative Council constantly widens it sphere of work. The 
employment bureau secured about 1200 positions for students during the past 
academic year. Its financial position is so satisfactory that it can give substantial 
help to such undergraduate organistations as the Band and the Orchestra, and can 
conduct a much-needed loan fund. I am grateful for the constant co-operation of 
the Council. 

The C.O.C.T. under command of Colonel H. H. Madill, head of the School 
of Architecture, is up to full strength. In succession to General Cartwright, Major 
Barry Watson — veteran of the Great War, a well-trained military officer, and a 
consulting engineer — has been appointed to the chair of Military Studies. As 
Major Watson is second in command of the Officers Training Corps, a close con- 
nection will be maintained between the Corps and the Military Studies Department. 

The Alumni Federation 

Under the auspices of the Alumni, a home-coming dinner was held in honour 
of the venerable Chancellor, the Rt. Hon. Sir William Mulock. By Sir Edward 



20 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Beatty. Dr. Llewellvs Barker, Mrs. W. A. Kirkwood and the president of the Alumni 
Federation. Dr. Deadman. greetings were presented to Sir William to which he 
fittingly replied. Then followed greetings by wireless from the British Postmaster- 
General. Rt. Hon. G. C. Tryon: Mr. W. G. Swan of Vancouver; Mrs. R. F. McWilliams 
of Winnipeg and Dr. Carleton Stanley. President of Dalhousie University, Halifax. 
On the Sunday following a special sermon was preached in Convocation Hall by 
the Rev. Hugh T. Kerr of Pittsburgh, one of our most distinguished graduates in 
the United States, who later in the year received our honorary degree of LL.D. 

It is important that the University keep in touch with the Alumni throughout 
the country. This can best be done by organising and maintaining branches of the 
Alumni Federation in all the chief centres of population. During the year I have 
addressed these branches in Owen Sound, Hamilton. Oshawa, Rochester. N.Y., Buf- 
falo, and New York. For three weeks in April and May I visited and addressed our 
graduates in Winnipeg. Saskatoon. Edmonton. Vancouver. Victoria. Calgary, Regina, 
Fort William and Port Arthur. Our Alumni are keen to hear about the progress of 
their Alma Mater. Such visits help towards the mutual understanding of East and 
West in Canada. 

Under the Secretary. Mr. Byron Wood, the general appearance and interest 
of the University Monthly have been well maintained, and fresh associations are being 
formed. 

Visiting Lecturers 

During the year the following special lectures were delivered: 
On the Alexander Foundation a course of three lectures by Professor D. Nichol 
Smith. Merton Professor of English Literature. University of Oxford, on "Eighteenth 
Century Literature: Pope. Johnson, Burns and Thomson"; a lecture by Mr. W. Arnold- 
Forster. technical adviser to the National Peace Council, London, on "Collective 
Security from the European and American Standpoints: the Principle of Sanctions"; 
a lecture by Professor K. Conant of the department of fine arts, Harvard University, 
on "Cluny"; a lecture by Professor Ernest Cohen, University of Utrecht, Holland, 
on "A new allotropic form of ice — metastable at atmospheric pressure"; two lecures 
by Dr. D'Arcy Thompson, professor of zoology, St. Andrew's University, Scotland, 
on "The Anatomist and the Engineer", and "The Forms of the Least and Simplest 
Organisms": a lecture bv Lt.-Col. E. L. M. Burns, Director of Geographical Section, 
General Staff, Department of National Defence. Ottawa, on "Aerial Photographic 
Surveying": four lectures by Dr. Ernes A. Hodgson, Seismologist, Dominion 
Observatory. Ottawa, on "Earthquakes"; a lecture by Dr. Gerhard Herzberg, pro- 
fessor of chemical physics. University of Saskatchewan, on "Spectra"; a lecture 
by Professor F. Baldensperger, formerly professor of comparative literature at the 
Sorbonne, now at Harvard University, on "La Crise du Roman; Balzac ou Proust"; 
a lecture bv Dr. R. H. Manske. National Research Council, Ottawa, on "The Alka- 
loids of Fumariaceous Plants"; a lecture by Dr. Morris Fishbein, editor of American 
Medical Association Journal, on "Foods, Fads and Fables"; two lectures by Mr. 
Brian Cook on "The British Throne" and "The Face of Britain"; two lectures by 
Dr. Herman 0. L. Fischer, professor of organic chemistry at University of Basle, 
Switzerland on "Organic Synthesis and Alcoholic Fermentation", and "Constitution 
and Configuration of China acid and similar plant acids"; a lecture by Mr. Edward 
Bradby, International Student Service. Geneva, Switzerland, on "Student and Youth 
Movements of Europe"; a lecture by Professor D. H. McLaughlin, mining geologist 
of Harvard University, on "The Relation of certain ore deposits to folded rocks"; 
a lecture by Professor E. S. Bastin. head of geological department. University of 
Chicago, on "Genesis of the Lead and Zinc Ores of the Mississippi Valley"; a 
lecture bv Professor W. J. Mead, head of geological department, Massachusetts 
Institue of Technology, on "Some Features of Structural Geology with Special 
reference to the strain ellipsoid"; a lecture by Professor H. Henel. Department of 
German. Queen's University, on "Interpretation of Goethe's Faust"; a lecture by 
Dr. T. D. Campbell, Superintendent of the Dental Faculty, University of Adelaide, 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROiNTO FOR 1937 21_ 

Australia, on "The Australian Aboriginals"; two lectures by Professor M. S. Vallarta, 
Massachusetts Insitute of Technology, on "Theory of Periodic and Asymptotic Orbits 
in the Earth's Dipole Field", and "Determination of Asymptotic and Shadow Orbits 
by means of Bush's Differential Analyser"; the Donald C. Balfour Lecture in Surgery 
by Sir. James Walton. London Hospital Surgeon, on "The Treatment of Peptic 
Uulcer '". a lecture by Professor Leon Lemonnier on "The Social Significance of the 
characters of Zola's Germinal"; three lectures by Dr. T. Vijayaraghavan, University 
of Dacca. India, and visiting lecturer of the American Mathematical Society, on 
"Tests for the behaviour of infinite-series of constant terms", "The rate of increase 
of real solutions of algebraic differential equations", and "Tauberian Theorems"; 
a lecture by Dr. Hugo Bergmann, Rector of the University of Jerusalem, on "The 
scientific contribution of the Hebrew L niversity of Jerusalem"; two lectures by 
Dr. F. Simon, head of the department of low temperature research in the Clarendon 
Laboratory. Oxford. England, on "Recent Developments in Low Temperature Work 
at Oxford", and "Application of Thermodynamics to the Explanation of the action 
of helium at low temperature". 

In connection with the Department of Physics a conference was held in February 
at which lectures were delivered by: 

Professor Niels Bohr, professor of theoretical physics, University of Copenhagen. 
Denmark, on "The General Problem of Measurements in atomic Theory", "Trans- 
mutations of Atomic Nuclei", and "Light and Life"; Dr. R. F. Bacher. Cornell 
Universitv. on "Nuclear Moments": Dr. J. Franck, Johns Hopkins University, on 
"Photosynthesis in Plants''; Professor J. H. VanVleck, Harvard University, on "The 
Influence of Dipole Coupling on Electric and Magnetic Susceptibilities"; Professor 
E. U. Condon, Princeton University, on "Mutual Interactions of Protons and Neu- 
trons"; Professor A. J. Dempster. L niversity of Chicago, on "The Masses of Some 
of the Heavy Elements"; Professor J. R. Roebuck. L^niversity of Wisconsin, on 
"The Determination of the Absolute Zero". 

University College Department of English arranged an exchange with Professor 
J. H. Hanford, Western Reserve University, Cleveland. 0., who lectured on "Milton, 
Chaucer and Spencer " and "Elizabethan Lvrics". 

Professor A. S. P. Woodhouse lectured at Cornell University. 

The following lectures were given in Convocation Hall under the auspices of 
the Royal Canadian Institute: 

By Hon. Paul Leduc, Minister of Mines of the Province of Ontario, on "The 
Mining Industry in Ontario"; Dr. E. D. Merrill. Professor of Botany. Harvard Uni- 
versity, on "Plants and Civilisation"; Dr. W. F. G. Swan, Director of the Bartol 
Research Foundation of the Franklin Institute, Swarthmore, P.. on "Science and 
Common Sense'": Dr. Ernest A. Hodgson. Dominion Observatory. Ottawa, on "Earth- 
quakes of Eastern Canada and Adjacent Areas"; Mr. Ellsworth Jaeger, Chairman 
of Education and member of Board of Managers, Buffalo Museum of Science, on 
"Indians of the South West"; Professor D'Arcy W. Thompson, University of St. 
Andrew's Scotland, on "Science and the Classics"; Dr. Wilmer' Souder, 
National Bureau of Standards. Washington, D.C., on "Scientific Crime De- 
tection"; Professor B. deF. Bavly. University of Toronto, on "Radio"; Pro- 
fessor D. H. McLaughlin. Harvard University, on "Gold Deposits of Australia 
and North America"; Mr. W. J. Hodge, Acoustical Engineer of the Johns-Manville 
Co., New York, on "The Science of Sound": Dr. William L. Finley. American 
Nature Association, on "Woods, Waters and Wild Life"; Professor G. F. Marrian. 
University of Toronto, on "Hormones — The Chemical Regulators of the Animal 
Body"; Dr. Harold C. Bryant, National Park Sercive, Washington, D.C., on "The 
National Parks of the United States"; Professor T. R. Loudon, University of 
Toronto, on "Aviation"; Dr. W. T. M. Forbes, Department of Entomology, Cornell 
University, on "Butterfly Geography"; Dr. Colin G. Fink, Department of Electro- 
chemistry. Columbia University, on "Products of Electrochemistry"; Dr. Roy W. 
Miner, American Museum of Natural History. New York, on "Diving in Coral 
Gardens"; Professor W. H. Martin, University of Toronto, on "The Scattering of 



22 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Light"; Principal R. C. \^ allace, Queen's Lniversity, on "The Scientific Man in 
Public Affairs": Dr. Edward Sapir, Professor of Anthropology, Yale University, on 
"The Science of Man '. 

Learned Societies 

The following Learned Societies met at the University: 

The American Association of Anatomists; The Royal Society of Canada; The 
Canadian Adult Education Association. 

Conference of Administrative Officers 

A Business Officers Conference or representatives from the Universities of 
Ontario was held in Februarv and was such a success that it has been decided to 
continue it annually. 

Special Convocations 

Special Convocations were held: On October 10th, 1936, on the occasion of 
the celebration by Victoria University of the one hundredth anniversary of the 
granting of the Royal Charter by His Majesty King William IV, when honorary 
LL.D. degrees were conferred by the University of Toronto, upon The Right Reverend 
Charles Wesley Flint, Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, North, and formerly 
Chancellor of Syracuse Lniversity; Mr. William Edward Rundle. formerly Treasurer 
of Victoria Lniversity. and a Governor of the University of Toronto; Dr. Arthur 
Melville Scott, formerly Superintendent of Secondary Schools, Calgary, Alberta; 
Mr. James Russell Lovett Starr. Chairman of the Board of Regents of Victoria 
Lniversity and a Senator of the University of Toronto. 

At the same Convocation Victoria University conferred the following honorary 
degrees of Doctor of Divinity upon His Excellency the Risrht Honourable Baron 
Tweedsmuir. Governor-General of Canada; The Right Rev. Peter Bryce, Moderator 
of the United Church; The Right Rev. Malcolm Arthur Campbell, Moderator of the 
Presbyterian Church; The Rev. Provost Francis Herbert Cosgrave, University of 
Trinity College; The Rev. Howard Primrose Whidden, Chancellor of McMaster 
Lniversity. 

On June 9th. when the following honorary degrees were conferred: Doctor of 
Laws upon Mr. Walter Seymour Allward, Sculptor; Dr. Oliver R. Avison, Medical 
Missionary; Mr. Lawrence Johnston Burpee, President, Royal Society of Canada; 
Mr. Robert Hamilton Coats, Dominion Statistician; The Hon. Henry Hague Davis, 
Judge of the Supreme Court of Canada; The Rev. Hugh Thomson Kerr, Minister, 
Shadyside Presbvterian Church, Pittsburgh, Pa. ; Mr. Duncan McArthur, Deputy 
Minister of Education of Ontario; Mr. Michael Alexander Mackenzie, Emeritus 
Professor of the Lniversity of Toronto; the degree of Doctor of Science upon Mr. 
Arthur Jeffrev Dempster, Professor of Physics of the Lniversity of Chicago; the 
degree of Doctor of Engineering upon Mr. Andrew Harkness, Consulting Engineer. 

Benefactions 

Durins the year the Lniversity has received the following benefactions, totalling: 
•8190,311.41: 

From the estate of the late Reuben Wells Leonard, S79,34L44: Rockefeller 
Foundation: Child Research and Parent Education. $20,017.23. School of Nursing, 
S17.499.76. Alberta Social Credit Survey, SSOO.OO; E?ton Endowment, 82.5,000; 
Ontario Mining Association Grant for research in silicosis, SIO.OOO; Carnesie 
Corporation: Fine Art, S7,389.25, Workers' Educational Association, $1,997.30; 



" UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 23 

A. C. Ransom Fund, Applied Science, S5,000: Reuben Wells Leonard Fellowship 
and Scholarships. S3.700; J. S. McLean Fellowship, S2,500; Flavelle-Peacock Lecture- 
ship: Sir Joseph Flavelle. SI. 250, Sir Edward Peacock, 1,250; Lindsley Fellowship, 
Geophysics. S1.600; Graduate Fellowships: Sir Joseph Flavelle, S500, Imperial Oil 
Limited. $500. Estate of late Sir Edward Kemp. S500; Canadian National Committee 
for Mental Hygiene. Psychiatry, Sl,273.14; Pakenham Memorial Prize, $1,025; 
H. R. Bain Matriculation Scholarship $1,000; D. A. Dunlap Memorial Scholarships, 
$1,000; J. W. L. Forster Library Fund, Fine Art, $1,000; Standard Brands Research 
Fund, Chemistry: $784.75; Sir Edmund Walker Scholarship, $450; Medical Society 
Bursary $400; University College Alumni Matriculation Scholarships $400; Gertrud 
Davis Exchange Fellowship, $400; Robert Bruce Scholarship, $394.15; Robert Simp- 
son Companv Scholarships. $350; S. R. Parsons Scholarship, Commerce and Finance, 
$250; J. B. Wilmott Scholarships in Dentistry, S250; Robert A. Bryce, Esq.. U.T.S.- 
Engineering Scholarship, S250; Canadian Dental Association Research Fund. $200; 
Professor E. J. Urwick, Social Science Bursaries, $200; Ontario Association of 
Architects Scholarships, $200; Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company Scholar- 
ship, Mechanical Engineering, $150; Pan Hellenic Association Prizes, $150; George 
Kennedy Scholarship, 130.56; Sarah Kennedy Scholarship, $130.56; J. A. Findlay 
Scholarship, Mechanical Engineering, $120; Sir John Eaton Memorial Scholarship, 
University Schools, $120; University College Alumnae Scholarship SlOO; Maurice 
Hutton Matriculation Scholarship, $100; Darling and Pearson Prizes in Architecture, 
SlOO; Toronto Brick Co. Prizes, Architecture, $100; Hon. Charles McCrea for Dent 
McCrea Scholarship, $100; University Tours Association Scholarship. $100; St. 
Margaret's College Alumnae Scholarship, S75; Ramsay Wright Scholarship. S54.30 
Toronto Women's League of the United Synagogue Scholarship, Medicine, S50 
Hollywood Theatre Prizes in French, $50; Dr. R. A. Reeve Prize in Medicine. $50 
F. W. Jarvis Bursaries. 850; T. M. Porter bequest, $33.90; Lambda Chi Alpha 
Alumni of Toronto for Ronald S. Saddington Medal, Pathology, $26.75; Hon. Dr. 
J. A. Faulkner for Faulkner Medal. 26.63; Engineering Institute of Canada Prize, 
$25; Ontario Medical Association Prize, $25; American Society of Heating and 
Ventilating Engineers, S25; Canadian Medical Institute Prize, $25; Alumnae Prize 
in English, SIO; Maurice Cody Memorial Scholarship, University Schools. $10; 
Professor G. 0. Smith for Fletcher-Johnson Prize, $10; Sundry small items, $27.49. 

In addition to the above the University Library has received books and pamphlets 
on Mexico from Mr. J. H. Cornyn, a graduate of University College 1893, now of 
Mexico City. 

The Johnson Matthey Company of Canada presented a valuable piece of silver 
apparatus to the Department of Chemistry. 

Our Needs 

As long as a university is alive it will have needs. It will require not a diminish- 
ing but a slightly increasing regular income if it is to hold its place in the educational 
service of the country. 

May I summarise a few of our present requirements: 

A gymnasium for the women of the University 

A substantial addition to the Chemistry Building 

New accommodation for Chemical Engineering 

An addition to the accommodation for Mechanical Engineering 

Two more storeys on the Banting Institute, for Medical Research 

A development of research in Social Science 

A development of courses in Public Administration 

A development of courses in Business Administration 

Fellowships in the School of Graduate Studies 

More Scholarships in course in the various Faculties 
and More space and more books for our Central Library. 



24 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Conclusion 

To the members of the staff, to the administrative officers, to the friends and 
alumni who have from time to time given the University goodwill and substantial 
help, to the loyal and self-disciplined body of students, to the Chairman and members 
of the board of Governors, who have advised and cheered me on so many occasions, 
and to the Government of the Province, which has largely provided for our financial 
necessities. I offer my sincere thanks. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

H. J. Cody 

President 

November 25th. 1937 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 25 



APPENDIX A 

( 1 ) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Arts. 

(2) Report of the Principal of University College. 

(3) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine. 

(4) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. 

(5) Report of the Dean of the Ontario College of Education 

(6) Report of the Secretary of the Faculty of Household Science 

(7) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Forestry 

(8) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Music. 

(9) Report of the Dean of the School of Graduate Studies. 

(10) Report of the Dean of the Faculty of Dentistry. 

(11) Report of the Director of the School of Hygiene. 

(12) Report of the Librarian. 

(13) Report on Research. 

(14) Publications. 

(15) Report of the Director of University Extension and Publicity. 

(16) Report of the Director of the Department of Social Science. 
(17t Report of the Director of the School of Nursing. 

( 18 I Report of the Director of the Department of Military Studies. 

( 19 I Report on Health Services. 

(20) Report of the Warden of Hart House. 

(21) Report of the Director of the Connaught Laboratories. 

(22) Statement regarding the Museum of Archaeology. 

(23) Statement regarding the Museum of Biology. 

(24) Statement regarding the Museum of Geology. 

( 25 ) Statement regarding the Museum of Mineralogy. 
(26 1 Statement regarding the Museum of Palaeontology. 

(27) Statement regarding the educational work of the Royal Ontario Museum. 

(28) Report of the Director of the David Dunlap Observatory. 



26 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

(1) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF ARTS 
(Professor Samuel Beatty, M.A., Ph.D.) 

The academic year 1936-37 was the first in which geography appeared in the 
Arts calendar as an optional subject in the pass and general courses, although 
Professor GriflSth Taylor joined the staff one year earlier and organised and conducted 
instruction during the session 1935-36. Judging from the fact that more than two 
hundred students selected geography as an optional subject in 1936-37, it is safe to 
conclude that it is ministering to a need felt by many. Fine art, which was introduced 
as a subject of instruction two years ago, was also chosen as an optional subject by a 
large number of students in the pass and general courses. The first year of the 
honour course in fine art was taken by about a dozen students. A new honour course 
in music will open with first year classes in 1937-38. One part in three will deal with 
the theory and practice of music, while the remaining two parts will be made up of 
cultural subjects, with a fairly wide range of options. 

At the time when the pass course was cut down to three years, due to the adoption 
of higher entrance requirements, the practice of transferring certain types of failure 
in honour courses to the next higher year of the pass course was discontinued. In 
the long run. this was felt to be a hardship, particularly in the case of first year 
honour students, account having been taken of the fact that the various honour 
courses are all more difficult than the pass course and have associated with them 
more exacting conditions for obtaining standing. Consequently, at the annual 
examinations of 1937, something like a return to the original practice was followed. 
A student failing in the first year of an honour course but yet obtaining an average 
of at least 50% on his honour subjects was recommended for transfer to the second 
year of the pass course, while a student failing in the second or third year of an 
honour course with however an average of at least 55% on the honour subjects of 
his course was granted the right of petition to be allowed to transfer to the third 
or fourth year of the general course. It is hoped that this adjustment will work 
to the advantage of each of the courses involved and to the students in them. 

The staff is becoming, in a very real sense, a group of experts, each in his own 
particular field. This can be accounted for by the care exercised in making ap- 
pointments and promotions and by the fact that the numerical increase in the staff 
has made it possible for the individual members to specialise in their particular 
interests. As may be expected, the quantity and value of new material published 
annually by the staff is steadily increasing. There is always a tendency to increase 
the content and complexity of courses and to grow less and less aware of the 
difficulties of students. The balance of preoccupation of the staff may even shift 
slightly towards the lecture and laboratory material and away from the human 
material in the class room. If we are to continue to progress, much that was once 
given as graduate work will come to be regarded as suitable for undergraduates. 
Nevertheless, the result of this development over a period of years may be that at 
the end the extent and difficulty of courses may be such that even the best students 
cannot find time to form their own opinions as to the source and role of many of 
the ideas set forth. If and when the staff finds this condition existing, it can be 
trusted to know how to deal with it. 

(2) REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
(Professor M. W. Wallace, M.A., Ph.D.) 

I have the honour to submit my annual report as Principal of the College. 

Serious illness has deprived us of the services of two of the senior members of 
our staff throughout the session Professor W. R. Taylor, head of the department 
of Oriental Languages, and Professor G. Oswald Smith, professor of Latin. I am 
glad to be able to report that they are both much improved in health, and that they 
are both looking forward to resuming their duties at the beginning of next session. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 27 

Professor Barker Fairley rejoined our stall in September last as head of the depart- 
ment of German after an absence of five years during which he was professor of 
German in the I. nivcrsity of Manchester. I regret exceedingly to record the fact 
that Professor H. J. Davis has resigned from the department of English to accept 
a chair in Cornell Liniversity. Professor Davis, a graduate of Oxford, came to us 
from Leeds University in 1922, and for fifteen years has been a great source of 
strength to the college. Widely known in the learned world for his scholarly studies of 
Swift, he was one of our most effective teachers of literature, a living refutation 
of the assumption that scholarship and publication on the one hand are incompatible 
with a thorough devotion to undergraduate needs. Besides his other great gifts 
to the college we are indebted to him for Gertrud Davis Fellowship which enables 
us annually to send a young graduate to Germany for a year's study. Professor 
Davis' resignation is a sad blow, but Toronto salaries are so modest in comparison 
to those paid by the larger American universities that we can only hope that similar 
blows will not fall too fast upon us. We are much pleased to have Professor E. K. 
Brown rejoin our staff after an absence of two years as head of the department of 
English in the University of Manitoba. 

It is always a pleasant duty to record the benefactions of graduates and other 
friends of the college, and only rarely have they been on a more munificent scale 
than those of the present year. The chief of these gifts are as follows: 

(a) A Travelling Fellowship, the gift of Mr. J. S. McLean, a graduate of University 
College in 1896. The fellowship is of the value of 1.250 and may be held for 
a second year if the holder submits satisfactory evidence of progress in his 
work. Mr. McLean has guaranteed the fellowship for a period of four years, 
that is. he has become responsible for a gift to the college of SIO.OOO. The 
fellowship is open to all members of the graduating class, and designed to 
enable the student to whom it is awarded to pursue his studies for two years 
in a British or Continental University. Exceptionally it may be held by a 
student who wishes to do graduate work in an American or Canadian University. 
It is unnecessary to point out the great significance to the intellectual life of 
the college of this magnificent gift. 

(b) A matriculation scholarship of the annual value of S250, the gift of Mr. Percy 
Hermant, father of Sydney Hermant who graduated in 1935 and who was 
president of the Literary and Athletic Society during his senior year. The 
scholarship will be awarded for general proficiency and carries free tuition in 
each year of the undergraduate course provided the winner maintains his stand- 
ing in first class honours. It is one of the most valuable in the college, and is 
another indication of the loyalty of our graduates to their Alma Mater. 

(c) Two scholarships of $125 each, to be awarded in each of the next five academic 
years, and to be known as the B'nai B'rith scholarships. These scholarships 
are the gift of the Toronto B'nai B'rith through the president of their Executive 
Committee, Mr. H. P. Green, and will be awarded on the results of the first 
vear examinations in social and philosophical studies and the second year 
examinations in mathematics and physics. It is very gratifying to have received 
this unsolicited gift as a testimony of the continued interest of our Jewish 
graduates in their college. 

((/) The renewal for a third year of the prize of $50 in oral French. This prize 
is the gift of the Hollywood Theatre through its manager, Mr. Raymond Allen, 
a former student of the college. 

(el The redecorating and refurnishing of the Women's Common Room in Univers- 
ity College by the Alumnae Association at a cost of some S650. This is only 
the last of many substantial annual gifts which our women graduates have made 
to the college. 

(f) A beautiful framed painting, "Passing Clouds" by David B. Milne, the gift of 
an undergraduate of the college who wishes to remain anonymous. The paint- 
injr has been hunjr in the East Hall Reading Room. 



28^ REPORT OF THE No. 12 

An unusual large number of fellowships in other universities have been won 
bv members of the graduating class. Mr. J. K. Macalister has been awarded a 
Rhodes Scholarship the fourth year in succession during which this honour has 
come to Universitv College. Miss M. J. Sinden has won the J. S. McLean Fellow- 
ship. Mr. Henrv Noyes. B.A. the Daughters of the Empire Oversea Scholarship, 
Mr. \^ . K. Bryden the Edward Kylie Award, Mr. E. H. Yarrill the R. W. Leonard 
Fellowship and Mr. S. F. MacDonald. B.A. the Gertrud Davis Exchange Fellowship 
In addition an unusuallv large number of the graduating class secured fellowships 
in American universities. 

A verv great honour came to the college a few months ago when the Alumnae 
Dramatic Club received the second award at Ottawa in the all-Canada Drama Festi- 
val which is held under the patronage of the Governor General. The successful 
play was The Cradle Song and Edgar Stone acted as director. 

The Alexander Lectures were delivered before large audiences in Hart House 
Theatre by Nicol Smith, professor of English literature in the University of Oxford. 
His subject was Some Observations on Eighteenth Century Poetry. The lectures 
will be published in the near future by the University Press. Next year we hope 
to welcome President Carelton Stanley of Dalhousie University Us Alexander 
Lecturer. 

A course of public lectures was delivered during the Michaelmas term on the 
following subjects: The Mediaeval Mind by Professor G. B. Phelan of St. Michael's 
College: Mediaeval Art. by Dr. P. Brieger; The Breton Romances of Mediaeval 
France, by Professor H. L. Humphreys; Chaucer, by Dr. A. E. Birney; Ariosto and 
the Renaissance, by Professor E. Goggio; Mediaeval Music, by Professor Robert 
Finch; and Cervantes, by Professor J. Cano. 

Last vear we inaugurated a series of informal exchange lectures with other 
universities when Professor DeVane. head of the department of English in Cornell 
Lniversitv spent several days with us, and Professor Davis spent a corresponding 
period at Cornell. This vear we received visits from Professor Hanford, professor 
of English in Western Reserve University, and Professor Hanel, professor of Ger- 
man in Queen's. Return visits were paid by Professor Woodhouse and Professor 
Fairlev of our own staff. The plan is working successfully and we hope to continue 
it and to extend its scope. 

At the recent great Congres de la laneue francais held in Quebec. Professor 
Jeanneret head of the department of French, was given the degree of Docteur-es- 
lettres, honoris causa by Laval Lniversity. 

For many years in the earlier history of the college it was the practice to open 
the session with a formal Convocation. This year we have revived the practice, and 
on the night before the actual beginning of the term both undergraduates and staff 
as well as manv graduates assembled in Convocation Hall. Brief speeches were 
made by the President and Principal, and a formal address by the Right Honourable 
Arthur Meighen. a graduate of the class of 1896. on the European Political Situation. 

(3) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE 
{Professor W. E. Gallie, M.D.. F.R.C.S.) 

The annual report of the Dean of the Faculty of Medicine is written each year 
in order that the President, the Board of Governors and the graduates may be kept 
aware of all the important activities of the Faculty during the previous twelve 
months. It contains, therefore, references to the more important enactments of the 
Faculty Council, an account of any changes that may be taking place in the 
laboratories and hospitals, any news items that might prove of general interest 
and the reports of the various academic departments. 

The first meeting of the Faculty Council saw the installation of the new dean. 
Doctor W. E. Gallie, professor of surgery. He was introduced by the President who 
requested for him the general support of the Council. At this same meeting, a 
resolution of warm appreciation of the services of the retiring dean. Professor 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 29 

J. G. FitzGerald, was adopted. Since his retirement from the deanship, Dr. Fitz- 
Gerald has been on leave of absence from the L niversity and has been making an 
extensive survey for the Rockefeller Foundation of the methods of teaching prevent- 
ive medicine in the medical schools of the United States. Canada, the British Isles 
and Europe. Upon the completion of this work he will return to take up again his 
duties as director of the School of Hygiene and the Connaught Laboratories. 

The most important enactment of the Faculty Council has been the raising 
of the conditions for academic standing at the end of the first year. It has long been 
felt that students who are unsuited to the long and arduous training required by 
modern medicine should be dropped from the course at the earliest possible mom- 
ent and given an opportunity to select, before it is too late, some other vocation 
in which they might be more likely to be successful. With this in mind the curric- 
ulum in the first year, which corresponds to a premedical year in other schools, 
was changed to consist of a first group composed of French or German, a second 
composed of biology, chemistry and physics and a third composed of history of 
science and civilisation. To obtain standing at the end of the year, the student must 
obtain at least fifty percent in each subject and an average of sixty percent in the 
group composed of biolog}". chemistry and physics. As a result of the raising of 
the standards in the first year, it is hoped that the weak students will be detected at 
once and started in other directions. 

As the selection of the students who are to be allowed to go into the second 
year and start the study of physiology and anatomy is a matter of great importance 
and as some members of the Faculty Council feel that perhaps a student's ability 
to pass an examination in premedical subjects should not be the sole guide in decid- 
ing whether he is likely to get through the medical course successfully, it has been 
decided to submit all freshmen, before the end of the first vear, to the aptitude test 
which is used by the Association of American Medical Colleges. This consists of 
a written examination in which a very large number of questions are asked which 
are designed to discover whether the students have those qualities which would 
enable them to face a rigorous six year course, to become good doctors afterwards 
and to occupy that place in the life of the country which a medical degree from 
this University suggests that they should occupy. 

Another enactment of great importance was the appointment of a committee to 
study the curriculum and to report to the Faculty whatever changes might be con- 
sidered beneficial. This committee has spent the past year considering the curricu- 
lum of the first, second and third years. Their report indicated that they believed 
that the timetable was too full and that matters might be improved by a general 
reduction by each of the departments of the number of hours prescribed in the 
calendar for laboratories and lectures. The Faculty adopted this report and durins 
the summer the various departments will try to work out a reduction of the number 
of compulsory hours. 

The discussion which attended the presentation of this report indicated that 
there was no unanimity in regard to it and that one department at least, namely, 
that of anatomy, was strongly opposed to a reduction of the number of hours 
devoted to that subject, on the grounds that it would be impossible for the average 
student to acquire an adequate knowledge of human anatomy if there were a radical 
reduction of hours. This matter is now being considered by the department and 
a solution will probably be found. 

Reference was made last year to certain experiments in teaching which were 
being tried in the department of surgery, designed to make the courst more practical. 
This department has been dissatisfied with the use hitherto made of the time at 
its disposal, particularly in the sixth year, and has been seeking ways of inducing 
the students to occupy less the position of onlookers and more that of participants 
in the daily work of the hospital. A decided improvement has been made by 
greatly increasing the routine duties of each student. Thus he is now responsible 
for all the hospital records; he is required to assist at operations on his own patients; 
he must take part in the daily work in the outpatient department and he must attend 



30 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

all emergencies occurring at night. The result has been that the students have 
really become assistants to the interns and are taking advantage of the excellent 
clinical opportunities that are afforded them. 

A similar improvement has been made in obstetrics by completing all didactic 
instruction in the fourth and fifth years and leaving the whole of the time in the 
final year to practical work. This means that each student has greatly increased 
opportunitv to work in the antenatal clinics, to see and assist at confinements and 
to follow the subsequent progress of mother and babe. This has been perhaps the 
most outstanding improvement in teaching that we have to report this year and 
nullifies the criticism we have had to accept for so long that our teaching of practical 
obstetrics was weak. 

The plan of accepting volunteer students to serve in the summer months which 
was adopted a year ago by the departments of surgery and obstetrics and gynaecology 
has proved very successful. It has two distinct advantages in that it gives those 
students who are able to attend hospital in the summer a wonderful opportunity 
for clinical work and it reduces the number of students in the regular classes during 
the rest of the year. At the end of the summer, the clinical examinations are held 
and if the student is successful he is given full credit for his work and is required to 
face no further examinations except the written final examination in the spring. 
During the period of ten weeks when, under normal circumstances, he would be 
taking" the subject he elected to take in the summer, he is detailed to some special 
service such as neurosurgery, urology, the surgery of childhood or some branch 
of medicine orpaediatrics if it can be arranged. The whole idea has proved very 
satisfactorv and is popular with the students who have been able to take advantage 
of the opportunity. 

In the reports of the various departments will be found reference to the many 
i.mportant researches which are being conducted. I must refer particularly, however, 
to several of these that are now approaching completion and which gives promise 
of far-reaching clinical results. 

Six vears ago, Professor Best began to study the possibility of using the newly 
discovered extract of liver, "heparin", which was known to delay the clotting of blood, 
in the prevention of thrombosis. As this is a matter which interests surgeons as 
much as physiologists. Professor Best suggested that the department of surgery join 
the department of physiology in the study. For several years, therefore, Professor 
Best and his associates and Dr. Gordon Murray and others in the department of 
surgery have been working steadily towards an answer to the question as to whether 
the administration of heparin could be expected to prevent thrombosis and also 
the more serious complication, embolism of the pulmonary artery. The experiments 
on animals are now complete and the first papers have been published. They show 
that, as far as animals are concerned, thrombosis in damaged arteries and veins 
can be prevented by the local heparinisation of the area by means of a solution of 
heparin introduced into the vein or artery through a fine needle. They also show 
that as a result of the continuous intravenous injection of a solution of heparin, the 
clotting-time of the general blood stream can be greatly lengthened and the tendency 
to thrombosis in damaged blood-vessels correspondingly reduced. 

Before administering this extract to patients, years of research had to be carried 
out in the Connaught Laboratories to ensure the purity of the product and to eliminate 
all possibility of harmful reactions. This has been accomplished with complete 
success and the drug has now been administered to over one hundred patients 
without deleterious effect and with what seems to be promising results as far as 
thrombosis is concerned. A hundred patients are. of course, too few to allow one 
to draw sweeping conclusions but it will not be long before a thousand cases will 
be available for review and if these resemble the first hundred a most important 
step forward will have been made. 

The funds for this long and expensive research have come from the University 
through the Connaught Laboratories and the department of physiology, from the 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 31 

Banting Foundation, and more recently, from generous contributions to the depart- 
ment of surgery made by Mr. J. S. McLean and Canada Packers, Limited. 

On June 15th, what may prove to be an epoch-making paper was read before 
the Academy of Medicine in Toronto by Mr. Denny and Doctor Robson of the 
Mclntyre Porcupine Mine and Dr. D. A. Irwin of the department of medical research 
on silicosis. This paper was really a preliminary report of the results of experiments 
on animals conducted at the mine and of the Banting Institute under the direction 
of Sir Frederick Banting, designed to discover ways of controlling this serious 
industrial disease. The chief results of these experiments were first that it was 
established that the incidence of the disease bore a direct relationship to the amount 
of silica dissolved in the body fluids and second, that any measures that reduced 
the amount of silic taken into solution in the body correspondingly reduced the 
appearance of the disease. This led to an intensive search for means of preventing 
the solution of silica dust in the fluids of the air passages and resulted in the dis- 
covery that the simple expedient of throwing a small quantity of finely divided 
aluminum dust into the air with the silica made the latter practically insoluble. 
How it does is not yet known but it may have something to do with the known fact 
that the silicon atom carries a negative charge and the aluminum atom a positive 
charge of electricity. At any rate the experiments showed that whereas animals 
exposed to ordinary mine conditions such as obtain in stopping operations, developed 
silicosis, other animals exposed to similar silica-laden air, which, however, carried 
a small quantity of aluminum dust, did not. 

This is the point at which the experiment now stands and the results have been 
considered so important that the whole of the resources of the department of medical 
research have been placed at the disposal of the silicosis workers and experiments 
on a very large scale have been undertaken by Sir Frederick Banting, Dr. Franks 
and Dr. Irwin in conjunction with the workers at the mine. 

The importance of a solution of the problem of silicosis in our mines cannot 
be overestimated. In spite of intensive study all over the world, no real progress 
has been made in the past ten years. And now as a result of a couple of bright ideas 
and the will to investigate and because of the presence here in the midst of the mining 
industry of a first class department of medical research, it would seem that the 
problem is almost solved. The workers deserve the best wishes of all for continued 
good luck in their study. 

The work at the Connaught Laboratories calls for special mention this year 
because of important modified preparations of Insulin which have recently been 
developed. About two years ago. Dr. H. C. Hagedorn and his associates of Copen- 
hagen, Denmark, proposed the addition of protamine to preparation of Insulin. 
In clinical studies they showed that such a modified preparation of Insulin had the 
important advantage that its blood-sugar-lowering effect was more prolonged than 
that of the original Insulin and that the frequency of administration could, there- 
fore, be reduced. To this Danish discovery has been added that of Dr. D. A. Scott at 
the Connaught Laboratories where it has been shown that the addition of a small 
amount of zinc to preparations of protamine and Insulin still further prolongs 
the effect of the hormone. Following intensive laboratory trials and co-operation 
with many hospitals and clinicians, a preparation of Insulin modified by the addition 
of protamine and zinc has been made available under the name of "Protamine Zinc 
Insulin". The use of his new preparation is indicated in many cases of diabetes 
mellitus which can be only inadequately controlled with unmodified Insulin. 

In the report of the department of medicine, will be found the modest statement 
that "the investigation on the therapeutice value and physiological action of adrenal 
cortical extract has been continued and extended this year bv Dr. Cleghorn and 
Mr. Armstrong. It is encouraging to report that a number of cases of Addison's 
Disease have been successfully treated by a highly potent nontoxic extract prepared 
in the Connaught Laboratories under the direction of Dr. McHenry". This statement 
indicates successful progress in an important research which has extended over 
years. If further clinical success attends the use of the extract a most important 



32 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

contribution to our defence against a hitherto incurable disease will have been made. 

I am glad to be able to report an increasing tendency on the part of the various 
departments to cooperate with one another in research. Outstanding examples are 
seen in the "heparin"' research conducted by the departments of physiology and 
surgery, a studv of the nature of nerve impulses and muscle contraction conducted 
by Drs. Solandt. Smith and Botterell of the departments of physiology, anatomy 
and surgerv. and the investigation which is occupying the attention of Professor 
Marrian of the department of biochemistry and Dr. M. C. Watson of the department 
of gynaecology and obstetrics on the female endocrines. Special attention is drawn 
to the increasing importance of the department of medical research, under the 
direction of Sir Frederick Banting, in aiding all other departments, and particularly 
the clinical, in the research problems which present themselves from time to time. 
At the present moment research workers in this department are associated with 
workers from the departments of medicine, surgery, psychiatry and paediatrics in 
problems which are primarily of clinical importance and the assistance which is 
being given to the advancement of these researches is inestimable. 

Similar beneficial effects have resulted from the combination of departments 
in teaching and in general routine work. Examples are seen in the combination of 
physiologv and surgerv as represented by Drs. Solandt and Botterell in the teaching 
of neurophysiology, and of pathology, medicine and surgery in the neuropatho- 
logical laboratory under Professor Linell. Dr. Hyland and Dr. K. G. McKenzie. 
Similar combinations in pathologv. medicine and surgery and of physiology and 
medicine have been most helpful. 

The re-organisation of the staff of the Western Hospital which has been pending 
for a long time was completed a year ago at the time of the opening of the important 
additions to the hospital plant. The new arrangement has been in action now 
throughout one complete session and from the standpoint of the Faculty of Medicine 
has been most satisfactory. Teaching has been carried on in medicine, surgery 
gynaecology and obstetrics and pathologv throushout the year under the direction 
of Professors Detweiler, Duff, Wesley and Shanks respectively. 

This year has been a sad one for the Faculty because of the death of our honored 
colleagues. Professor Oskar Klotz. Professor F. W. Marlow. Dr. A. J. Kilgour, 
Dr. J. E. Bates and Dr. M. M. Crawford. 

Professor Klotz died on November third. 1936. in his fifty-ninth year. He 
will be remembered by his students as a most distinguished pathologist, a splendid 
teacher and a remarkable organiser. Professor Marlow died on October second, 
after a long fight with serious illness. He was a fine surgeon and an excellent teacher 
and a man who occupied a prominent place not only in his profession but also in 
the life of the city. Dr. Kilgour died at the age of forty-four years with what 
seemd to be a promising career in psychiatry before him. Dr. Bates was a young 
pathologist of attractive personality and his sudden death cast a gloom over the 
department. Dr. M. M. Crawford, chief coroner of Toronto and lecturer in medical 
jurisprudence was known and beloved by all. 

This year saw a change in the arrangements for the Balfour Lecture. Hitherto 
it has been delivered on Lister Day, April 5th. As the limitation of the lecture 
to that date, however, made it impossible to have lecturers from the other side of the 
sea except on such rare occasions as a suitable lecturer might be visiting America 
at that time, the Faculty decided that from time to time the date might be changed 
so that our students might have the advantage of hearing distinguished surgeons 
from abroad. This year the lecture was deliverd on October sixteenth by Sir James 
Walton, surgeon to His Majesty, the King, and his subject was, "The Surgical Treat- 
ment of Peptic Ulcer", a subject which has made him famous. Sir James was listened 
to by a huge audience which delighted to welcome so distinguished a visitor from the 
old country. The plan of occasionally changing the date of the lecture has been 
approved by all. 

The Faculty has heard with great satisfaction of the appointment of Professor 
William Boyd to the chair of pathology. This university is exceedingly fortunate 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 33 

in being able to secure so distinguished a pathologist and so great a teacher. He 
needs no introduction as every student who has graduated from any English-speaking 
medical school in the past ten years is familiar with his books. His coming to Tor- 
onto will probably mean the introduction here of the method of clinical pathological 
teaching which has become his chief interest. The Faculty bids him welcome. 

The success of the short postgraduate courses which have recently been held 
in the autumn has been so great that they will be continued. Last year, courses were 
given in physiotherapy and abdominal surgery. This year, courses of one week each 
will be given in manipulative therapy, cardiovascular disease and fractures. Limited 
numbers of students are admitted to these courses and their whole time is occupied 
throughout the week. Students have expressed themselves as delighted with the 
plan of an intensive review of some special branch of work and are asking for 
continuation of the courses. The Faculty finds this contact with the graduates most 
enjoyable. 

This year the assistant dean and secretary, Dr. E. S. Ryerson, is the President 
of the Association of American Medical Colleges and he will preside at the coming 
meeting in California. Professor C. H. Best spent the month of April as guest- 
lecturer at the L'niversities of California, Southern California and Leland Stanford. 
During the week of November fourteenth, the Dean occupied the position of Honor- 
ary Surgeon-in-Chief at the Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled in New York where 
he had been house-surgeon thirty years before. 

(4) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE 

AND ENGINEERING 

(C. H. Mitchell, C.B.. C.M.G., C.E., D.Eng.) 

The session now closing completes the sixtieth year of this Faculty, dating from 
the time when it commenced as the original School of Practical Science. After an 
independent period of nearly thirty years it developed into the Faculty of Applied 
Science and Engineering, by the University Act of 1906. and since that time has been 
an integral part of the University along with the other faculties, holding third place 
in order of seniority. The number of graduates who have gone out in the sixty years 
is 4,425, and it is computed that about 4,000 of these are living. 

It is gratifying to report a highly successful academic year. The work of the 
staff and students alike has continued to be of a high standard and it is again notice- 
able that serious, diligent application on the part of the students has been maintained. 
If the earnestness exhibited by them the past several years is in part attributable to 
the prolonged depression, there may be said to be some compensatory result from 
our recent difficulties in this respect. 

The upswing in numbers of students in attendance appears now to be set up 
again. As was noted in last year's Report, the incoming years have now definitely 
increased in size, the low spot having been between 1933 and 1935. The first vear 
attendance in 1933 was 226; in 1934. 221; in 1935. 248, and in 1936, 282. The 
total attendances in all years for the same periods were 883, 795, 766, and 789. There 
is every likelihood, judged by the present statistics, that next year's total attendance 
will approximate the first of these figures, and thus bring the attendance back to 
the high pre-depression figures. 

Again, however, we are confronted with the continued ill-proportioned distribu- 
tion of attendance in the various departments composing the Faculty as a whole. 
As was reported last year, students still continue to crowd into mining and chemical 
engineering. In the former department the total number in the four years during 
the past session, was 160. of which 76 were in the first year; these are unprecedented, 
and in respect of attendance this department is now second in size in the Faculty. In 
Chemical engineering the total number was 228, of which 67 were in the first year, 
which is a slight decrease for that year. Again I must emphasise the great necessity 
for increased accomodatibn and facilities for instruction in chemical and mechanical 
engineering, and it is strongly hoped that in the forthcon)ing year steps will be taken 



34 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

to make thi? provision by the construction of the new building which has long been 
under consideration. 

In other departments, such as mechanical and electrical, the numbers in attend- 
ance are again on the increase, but as yet the total numbers are not into line propor- 
tionate with their importance in the profession or sutiicient to meet the demand for 
young engineers in the forthcoming years. This disproportion is most marked in 
the field of civil engineering, and. as was pointed out in last year's Report, the great 
falling off the past few years in attendance in this department is already making 
itself felt. \^ hile there was recently an increase in the junior years, there were only 
56 students in this department this session. This is a poor prospect for the supply 
of civil engineers as a quota to the needs of returning construction activity of the 
countrv; indeed, there is already a marked deficiency of young men in this field of 
engineering, a scarcity which has manifested itself sooner than was anticipated. 
In the department of metallurgical engineering, a very considerable increase in 
students is notable, there having been a total of 58 the psst session, a figure over 
double that of. say. four years ago. 

This session has been noteworthy in the inauguration of several new courses 
and changes in the curriculum. The most outstanding of these is the establishment 
of a new graduating department within the Faculty to be known as mining geology, 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Applied Science, as in other departments. This 
contemplates training of geologists to cooperate with mining engineers in the fast- 
growing mineral industrv of the country. It is not an engineering course, but is 
essentiallv one in applied science designed to better fit graduates specialising in 
geological sciences to understand and appreciate the problems of mining engineers 
and others cooperating in the mining industry. 

An expansion and rerrrangement of the department of metallurgical engineer- 
ing has also been brought about by forming within that department a division to deal 
with non-metal lies as well. As this will include the former ceremics, which was 
introduced eleven vears ago. the new division will be called "Ceramics and Non- 
Metallic Industrial Minerals", and will provide for four years as in the regular 
metallurgical course, thus replacing the present ceramics option of two year's 
duration. This broadened course is designed to meet the increasing importance of 
the non-metallic mineral industry, which is a newly developed branch closely related 
to metallurgical work. The University will thus keep abreast of these newer 
development? and by this change will actually take the lead in recognising them in 
Canada. 

The school of architecture has again made progress in its academic work by 
the addition of several features to its curriculum. Expansion of its instruction in 
town planning and housing is now contemplated to meet the growing demands in these 
important phases of present-day life. Its staff, graduates and students have been partic- 
ularly successful in winning various competitions and prizes during the year. It is 
unfortunate that the attendance has not yet progressed with other departments, but 
this was to be expected from the effects of the depression from which the architectural 
profession greatly suffered. 

Attention may again b? drawn to the increase in demand for graduates in the 
engineering and architectural professions. It is sufficient to state, in this respect, 
that nearlv all of the graduating class of 138 going out at the end of the present 
session were absorbed in employment and there was a marked demand in civil, mining 
and metallurgical engineering, even a shortage. Graduates in mechanical, electrical, 
and chemical engineering found ready employment in the order named. 

The University is fortunate in having such an energetic and loyal body of 
graduates as is evidenced by the activities of the Engineering Alumni Association, 
and bv the interest taken by officers and committees in the Faculty, and graduates. 
The triennial re-union of this organisation in October, with nearly a thousand 
in attendance, was a marked success. The University is fortunate, too, in the interest 
taken by the graduate representatives of this Faculty upon the Senate, an interest 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROiNTO FOR 1937 35 

which, during the past year, has been specially marked. It is to be hoped that the 
number of these representatives will shortly be increased. 

The extension and diverse parts played by graduates of this Faculty in the various 
phases of Canadian development continue to be conspicuous, and especial Iv so the 
past year in connection with proceeding and meetings of the national societies devoted 
to engineering and industrial pursuits. No only in these, but in general activities 
in various parts of Canada, and indeed of the Empire, as reports come in from time 
to time, it is gratifying to observe that our engineering graduates are more than ever 
taking their place in large business and in public undertakings and activities. As 
a recent instance of this, attention may be drawn to the semi-centeimial meeting in 
Montreal this month of the Engineering Institute of Canada, where there was a regis- 
tration of over eight hundred engineers, from Canada as well as from Overseas. 
This society is the all-embracing organisation of various branches of the engineering 
profession throughout the Dominion. A large number of the participants, and a 
very large proportion of those in attendance, were graduates of this University. In 
this connection it may be pardonable to present the observation that of the forty- 
eight presidents of the Institute in the last half century, whose names were prom- 
inently displayed, eighteen were college graduates, of whom half were alumni of 
this University. In other organisations of more recent date, the proportion is even 
greater. 

The School of Engineering Research has carried on its useful work, not- 
withstanding the greatly curtailed appropriation for this purpose. It was able 
to pursue some twenty-four researches, some of which are already proving of 
considerable importance and use in industry. A detailed account of the subjects and 
objects of these researches and of the progress made during the session, forms a 
separate report which is presented by the Committee of Management of the School 
of Engineering Research. 

Memiers of the faculty staff continue to improve their knowledge of engineering 
practice bv international study and travel ; this is highly commendable and is to be 
encouraged, especially in keeping up-to-date in applied science progress. During 
summer vacations within this twelvemonth, six heads of departments and the Dean 
have, on their own initiative, made extended tours to Great Britain, Northern. Central 
and Southern Europe, South Africa. China, and Japan. Various members have 
also made tours of inspection through the United States, the head of the school of 
architecture having visited a number of similar colleges while in session. 

It is with much regret that the members of the Faculty learned of the death in 
March of Louis B. Stewart, professor emeritus of surveying and sometime secretary 
of this faculty in its early days, he had retired from active University work in 1931. 

(5) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE ONTARIO COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

I Dr. J. G. Althouse I 

The registration of the session 1936-37 was lower than that of 1935-36. Inclusive 
of the extramural students, the total number registered in the courses for teachers 
was 653 as against 774 in 1935-36. The most marked decrease is seen in the high 
school assistant's course, although the proportion of those seeking specialist standing 
has increased. 

The registration in the librarians' course was 45 and the demand for trained 
librarians for the public and special libraries of Ontario was relatively satisfactory. 
The degree course of the Library School has now been accredited by the American 
Library Association. 

During the session, the department of education research published two bulletins: 
"Forecasting Teaching Ability" and "Hearing Abilities of Pupils in Toronto Public 
Schools." In the first of these, there is included a study of the prognostic value of 
the marks in practice-teaching obtained by teachers-in-training. This study was 
financed by a grant of the Carnegie Corporation. The standardised test in world 
geography is now completed and will be issued at cost price to teachers and other 



36 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

educators in Canada. Two intelligence tests — one for 10-year-olds and the other for 
18-vear-olds — are nearing completion. An annotated bihliography of publications 
on Canadian education has been started and good progress has been made. 

The session brought momentous staff changes. W.H.Williams, M.A., B.Paed., an 
instructor on the staff of the University of Toronto Schools since 1917, died on May 
5 after a long illness. Mr. Williams had assised from time to time in the work of 
the College in the modern language department, and had evinced keen interest in 
the various activities of the school, especially in public speaking. His unusual ability 
in German, as well as in French, enabled him to make a unique contribution to the 
scholarship of the school and of the College. 

Professor W. C. Ferguson, a member of the original staff of the faculty of 
education, tendered his resignation at the close of the year. Professor Ferguson 
assumed responsibility for instruction in modern languages in the faculty of education 
after singularlv successful teaching experience in the secondary schools of Uxbridge, 
St. Mary's. London and Toronto. Despite the demands of his teacher-training duties 
he maintained the keenest interest in the University of Toronto Schools. For some 
months after the death of the first headmaster, he served as acting headmaster, and 
never relinquished direct contact with the classroom teaching of the school. Professor 
Ferguson's own teaching skill, his warm personal interest in the students and his 
unbounded energy have combined to win for him a unique place in the profession. 
He has served the Department of Education repeatedly on special committees and in 
the summer schools. It is earnestly hoped that he may long enjoy the leisure from 
routine activities which he has so amply earned. 

Mr. A. N. Scarrow, in charge of manual training in the College and in the Un- 
iversity Schools since 1910, reached the retirement age and will be missed in both 
institutions. Engaged in the training of teachers since the Model School days, Mr. 
Scarrow has been a wholesome influence in the schools of the province. His patience 
and thoroughness, as well as his devotion to the practical side of education, will not 
be readily duplicated. 

Mr. G. A. Cline has been on leave of absence throughout the year, because of 
illness. His absence and the illness and death of Mr. Williams, have imposed a 
heavy burden on the headmaster of the University Schools. 



(61 REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE FACULTY OF 
HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

(Professor C. C. Benson. Ph.D.) 

The registration in this Faculty, for this session, has again been slightly smaller 
that it was for the preceding, but this is to be expected. It is now, with the advanced 
matriculation requirements, quite possible for many of the students who would have 
come to this Faculty, to enter the Faculty of Arts, and it is, in general, advisable 
for them to do so, as such registration gives them opportunities for residence life 
and for other connections which we cannot provide. 

This Faculty has, however, again served its purpose of making provision for 
students from Macdonald Institute and from the Universities, and, of the forty-six 
registered, nineteen have entered with advanced standing, one from Manitoba, one 
from British Columbia, one from Newfoundland and others from Macdonald 
Institute. 

The work and administration of the affairs of the Faculty have proceeded much 
as in earlier years. Dr. Jessie Brodie, who succeeded Professor Laird last autumn, 
has ably administered the rather complicated organisation of the department of 
household science, with its connections both with this Faculty and with the Faculty 
of Arts, and all members of the staff have continued to do good work. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 37 

(7) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF FORESTRY 

{Dr. C. D. Howe) 

The enrolment of students in the entrance class was the largest for some years 
but not large enough to overcome the declining attendance in the school as a whole, 
it being thirty-three compared with thirty-seven of the previous year. There seems 
to be little doubt, however, that the attendance will increase from now on because 
of the increased demand for men with forestry training. Last year twelve of the 
fourteen graduates succeeded in obtaining positions. This year there are only seven in 
the graduating class and each of these has received at least two offers. In other words 
twice as many men could have been employed and each was assured of a position a 
month before graduation. This is the first time such a thing has happened in the 
history of the school. With three exceptions all the twenty-six undergraduates were 
engaged for summer jobs before the end of the term and this is a situation that has 
not occurred in the past seven years. The increased demand for foresters particularlv 
among the pulp and paper companies also has taken up practically all the unem- 
ployment slack of the depression, a half dozen of our graduates having succeeded 
in re-entering the profession during the past year. Five members of the graduating 
class have been taken by pulp and paper companies and two by the Dominion 
Government. Among the undergraduates ten are in private employment and eleven 
in the government services, eight of the latter being with the Dominion Forest 
Service. 

You will recall that last year at the instigation of the Ontario Hunters Game 
Protective Association, the Board of Governors and the Senate authorized the 
establishment of a course in fish and game conservation. In co-operation with the 
department of biology, a course of one hour a week through the session was given 
to the fourth year. It was very successful, and we hope that the course can be 
enlarged in the near future with the growth of the concept of the multiple use of 
forest lands. This idea has already found expression in the King tow^nship project 
where an attempt will be made, after a thorough survey of present conditions, to 
restore the natural habitat conditions of wild life so that eventually the area may 
once again teem with fish, game, fur bearing animals and other forms of wild life. 
Of course the key to the success of the project is the restoration of a vigorous forest 
growth on the non-agricultural lands. This is where the forester comes into the pic- 
ture and it also indicates why a forester engaged in such work needs to know the 
fundamentals of fish and game conservation. The direction and the working out of 
the details of such a program of course lie in the hands of the trained biologist. 
Two of our graduates are working on the King township project. 

Another event of great importance to the Faculty has taken place recently in 
the giving of a short course in the methods of measuring and culling of saw^ logs and 
pulpwood as practised by the Department of Lands and Forests. This course was 
given at the spring camp by licensed scalers loaned for the purpose by the Provincial 
Government. While the students get a thorough training in the principles of 
forest mensuration, this opportunity for intensive study of one of its practical 
phases under experienced men cannot help but make the future graduates of 
greater use to their employers. We are greatly indebted to the Minister and Deputy 
Minister of Lands and Forests for the establishment of this course. 

(8) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF MUSIC 
(Sir Ernest MacMillan) 

A significant step has been taken in the development of music in the University 
of Toronto by the establishment of an honours arts course in music. It is hoped 
that this course may serve the two-fold purpose of increasing the number of 
musicians with a broad, cultural background, and widening interest in music in 



38 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

the community. During the ensuing year, instruction in the musical branches of 
this course will be carried on by members of the present Faculty of Music. 

During the session 1936-37 the number of students registered was 50, in the 
course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Music; 10 registered in the first year, 
22 in the second year, and 18 in the third year. The degree of Bachelor of Music 
was conferred on 7. 

The usual series of lectures have been given by members of the Faculty, 
and 10 students have been registered for special tutorial classes. 

Three organ recitals were given during the season in Convocation Hall, 
arranged by Dr. Healey Willan, one by Dr. Willan and the other two by Dr. 
Charles Peaker and Mr. Frederick Silvester respectively. 

The Conservatory Choir has appeared in Convocation Hall in the annual 
performance of Bach's "Saint Matthew Passion" on March 23rd, and has also 
sung Delius' "Appalachia", Bax's "St. Patrick's Breast-Plate" and MacMillan's 
"Te Deum" in Massey Hall with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. The Con- 
servatory Orchestra, under the direction of Mr. Ettore Mazzoleni, appeared twice 
in Massey Hall. Other Conservatory organizations, notably the Conservatory 
String Quartet, have made valuable contributions to the musical season in Toronto. 

The musical activities of Hart House have continued to hold the interest 
of the students. The progress made during the last season by the Hart House 
Glee Club, under Dr. Charles Peaker, has been noteworthy. The carillon recitals 
given in the Memorial Tower by Mr. J. L. Richardson are as always a popular 
feature of the musical life of the University. 

The Alumni Association of the Toronto Conservatory of Music has become 
afiiliated with the Alumni Federation of the University and has been most active 
in promoting the interests of the institution — in particular, the establishment of 
a Foundation Fund for the assistance of talented and deserving students, in the 
name of the honorarv registrar of the Conservatory, Miss Marion G. Ferguson, 
which has aroused widespread interest, and many contributions have been received. 

There has been a notable increase in registration for tuition at the Toronto 
Conservatory of Music. The number of candidates entering for examinations for 
the present season has been 13,498. 



(9) REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

(Professor G. S. Brett I 

The number of students registered in the School of Graduate Studies for the 
year 1936-37 was 637. an increase of 24 as compared with the previous year. 
The number registered for the different degrees showed no important variation: 
for the Ph.D. the number was 134 as compared with 143 in the previous year, 
and for the M.A. 140 as compared with 156: a relatively large increase occurred 
in the registration for M.S.A. which rose from 4 to 19. The number of men 
enrolled for all degrees rose from 452 to 464: the number of women decreased 
from 161 to 137. making a total decrease of 39 or twenty-three per cent, in two 
years. 

The number of students resident in the Province of Ontario was 472, an 
increase of 35; the number from Toronto was 302 (an increase of 45) ; from the 
other parts of the Province 170 (a decrease of 10). (For details see Appendix B 
(K).) The number of students from other Provinces of Canada was as follows: — 
Nova Scotia 21, New Brunswick 18, Prince Edward Island 2, Quebec 6, Manitoba 
21, Saskatchewan 23, Alberta 6, British Columbia 20. The number from other 
countries decreased from 52 to 48. The sources were as follows: Great Britain 9, 
India 1, China 2, Japan 1, Germany 3, Denmark 1, Esthonia 1, U.S.A. 26. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 39 



The number of institutions represented in the School was 50. Among these 
are the universities of the provinces indicated above and twenty universities or 
colleges in the United States: in Ontario McMaster University (with Brandon Col- 
lege) supplied 39 students. Queen's University 36, University of Western Ontario 
26. The number of students who had taken their first degree at Toronto was 377, 
an increase of 25. 

The distribution of the candidates for the different degrees was as follows: — 

Ph.D 134 

M.A 140 

M.A.Sc 13 

C.E 1 

E.E 1 

D.Paed 92 

M.Sc.fDent.l 1 

M.S.A 19 

D.V.Sc 2 

The distribution of the candidates according to their major subject was as 
follows: — ^Anatomy 1. anthropology 3, applied mathematics 5. architecture I, astron- 
omy 1, biochemistry 14, biology 32. botany 25. chemistry 44, chemical engineering 
7, Chinese archaeology 3. civil engineering 4. classics 26. dentistry 1. educational 
theory 3, electrical engineering 1. English 64, food chemistry 2, geography 2, geology 
11, Germanic languages and literature 15, history 30, household science 5, hygiene 
and preventive medicine 5, law 5, mathematics 11, mechanical engineering 4, miner- 
alogy 3, mining engineering 4, pathology and bacteriology 3. pathological chemistry 
2, pedagogy 92, pharmacology 1, philosophy 51, physics 20, physiology 9, political 
science 22, preventive dentistry 1, psychology' 53, romance languages 22, Semitic 
languages 12, veterinary science 2. professional degrees 2. special committees 13. 

The number of students recommended for degrees during the session 1936-7 was 
as follows: — 

Ph.D 39 

M.A 78 

M.A.Sc 11 

C.E 1 

D.Paed 3 

M.S.A 1 

Fellowships: — The Open Fellowships which are awarded by the Council of the 
School were increased this year from two to eight in number. The increase was due 
to the fact that six fellowships of the value of S500 each were provided from the 
estate of the late Colonel R. W. Leonard to be awarded to graduates of the universities 
of Canada. The need for more fellowships has been obvious for many years as the 
number of applicants with high qualifications is usually more than forty. The 
acquisition of the Leonard Fellowships marks a great advance on the previous 
conditions, but the resources of the School are still far from adequate to meet the 
requirements. 

The Open Fellowships were awarded as follows: — 

F. E. L. Priestley, M.A. Alberta, department of English. 

M. H. Thomas. B.Sc. New Brunswick, department of chemistry. 

G. H. Ford, B.A. Manitoba, department of English. 

M. A. W. Western. B.A. Saskatchewan, department of history. 

E. E. Lewis. M.A. Dalhousie, department of philosophy. 

J. C. Findlav. B.A. McMaster, department of physics. 

M. D. Darrach. M.A. British Columbia, department of biochemistry. 

B. B. Hillary. M.A. British Columbia, department of botany. 
Scholarship award: — Miss E. Frumhartz, B.A. Toronto, department of history. The 
following special awards were made by the Council of the School: — 
Alexander Mackenzie Fellowships: — 

H. D. Woods. B.A. New Brunswick, M.A. McGill; department of political science. 

E. C. Gould. M.A. Toronto, department of history. 



40 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Ramsay Wright Scholarship : — 

J. M. Speirs. B.A. Toronto. 
Fellowships tenable in the School of Graduate Studies were awarded by the respective 
Committees of Award as follows : — 

War Memorial Fellowship: — 

K. C. Mann. B.Sc. Sask.: M.A. Toronto: department of physics. 

Maurice Codv Fellowship: — 

H. D. Woods. B.A. New Brunswick; M.A. McGill; department of political 
science, 

Leonard Fellowship ( L niversitv College Council I : — 

E. H. Yarrill. B.A. 
Staff Appointments: The number of graduate students holding positions as demon- 
strators or instructors during the session 1936-7 was 190. 

( 10 1 REPORT OF THE DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF DENTISTRY 

{Arnold D. Mason. D.D.S.) 

In June. 1936. Dr. Albert E. Webster, who had served on the faculty for forty- 
three years, retired owing to ill-health, and on November .5th he passed away. His 
loss was deeplv mourned by members of the staff. He had filled various positions, 
was dean for eight years and professor of operative dentistry for thirty years. Dr. 
Webster's retirement necessitated the re-organization of this department. As pro- 
fessor of operative dentistrv. I have assumed the duties of head of the department, 
and Dr. R. G. Ellis has been appointed to take charge of the infirmary and assist in 
the laboratory teaching. 

In the department of preventive dentistry, since the passing of Dean Seccombe 
who was professor of this subject, M. A. Cox. M.D., and Miss Doris Berry, M.A., 
who had been associated with him. have continued, and G. B. Shillington, D.D.S., 
was appointed to teach particularly the dental application. I regret that Dr. Shill- 
ington is now resigning to take up the study of medicine. This will necessitate 
another appointment which may retard the development of this department. 

An intensive studv of the curriculum was conducted during the session by the 
members of the Faculty Council. Outlines of the different courses were presented 
to the Council by the various professors and discussions took place at each meeting 
with reference to the correlation of each subject with other subjects of the curriculum. 
The studv was taken up from three standpoints: first, to study the content of the 
Report, "A Course of Study in Dentistry", of the Curriculum Survey Committee of the 
American Association of Dental Schools; second, to compare it with the existing 
course as given in this Faculty; third, to recommend changes which would improve 
the present curriculum. The study has been very illuminating to the members of 
the Faculty and the comments have enabled us to make some adjustments to eliminate 
discrepancies both as to time and content. I believe the study will result in generally 
improving the correlation of the curriculum and strengthening the course. 

A new time-table for the second to fifth years has been drawn up for next session 
with the hours from 9.00 a.m. to .5.00 p.m. instead of from 8.30 a.m. to 5.30 p.m. 
The first vear has already been based on these hours This will make a more harm- 
onious arrangement with the departments of the Lniversity teaching the fundamental 
sciences and will be appreciated by the student body 

The registration of students in the regular dental course for session 1936-37 was 
195, an increase of 3 over last session. Twenty-three young women were accepted 
for the course in dental nursing and twenty of them graduated. Nine graduates in 
dentistry from elsewhere were enrolled in the fifth year to proceed to the degree of 
doctor of dental surgery. Six of these were from Australia, one from England, 
and two from the Lnited States. They were from the following universities: 5 
University of Sydney. 1 Lniversity of Queensland, 1 London University, 1 North- 
western and 1 Washington University. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 41 

The department of orthodontia held a post-graduate course of two weeks' dur- 
ation, which was attended by three graduates of this Faculty and three from the 
United States. Special comments of appreciation were expressed bv the registrants. 

We are encouraging the recognition of this Faculty as a post-graduate centre. 
An announcement has been placed in the calendar regarding two courses: one in 
peridontia and radiodontia. and one in operative and preventive dentistry, to be 
given consecutively in April. 1938. These courses are conducted so that there is no 
additional expense incurred by the I. niversity. 

Arrangements for graduates to attend short refresher courses are possible at 
any time. During the past session three graduates availed themselves of this service, 
as well as two graduates from other universities, one from Sydney and one from 
Birmingham. 

Extramural lectures and clinics to the dentists of Ontario which were again made 
possible by the generosity of the Board of the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of 
Ontario in addition to the grant by the Board of Governors of the University, have 
been most satisfactory to all concerned. Thirtv-four meetings were held in twentv- 
one different centres, and were addressed by nineteen members of the Faculty. As 
the dentists in the northern part of the province are somewhat isolated, this service 
is particularly appreciated by them. 

The library has been taxed to the limit of its capacity. The steady growth in 
the number of books takes increasing floor space for stacks, thus further limiting 
the room for the purpose of reading. It will not be long before new accomodation 
will be imperative. So that students may have greater use of the library, it remains 
open continuously from 9.30 a.m. to .5.30 p.m. during the session. A travelling- 
library service has been inaugurated. This comprises a case of approximately 20 
books and is sent, on request, to dental societies throughout the province. Thunder 
Bay Dental Society at Port Arthur was the first to ask for this service and 22 different 
dentists made use of the books. Other societies have made enquiries and their 
wishes will be met during the ensuing session. The expense of this service is 
covered by the societies to whom the books are sent. 

The policy of the Faculty Council prohibiting students purchasing used text 
books has been discontinued. Students will be permitted to purchase the prescribed 
text books wherever possible, and this mav result in a financial saving. 

A committee has been formed to establish suitable memorials to the late Deans 
Seccombe and Webster in the form of scholarships to deserving students of this 
Faculty. The appeal for funds is being made to the dentists practising in the various 
provinces of Canada as well as graduates living elsewhere, and will not be completed 
until some time this autumn. The general committee in charge is composed of the 
Executive Committee of the Faculty, a committee representing the dentists of Ont- 
ario, a representative from each of the other provinces, and the Presidents of the 
Canadian Dental Association, the Royal College of Dental Surgeons of Ontario, 
and the Ontario Dental Association. 

(Ill REPORT OF THE ACTING DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL OF HYGIENE 

(/?. D. Defries. M.D.. D.P.H.) 

In the absence of the director. Dr. J. G. FitzGerald. I have pleasure in presenting 
the tenth annual report of the School of Hygiene, relating to the academic session 
1936-1937. 

The occasion of the absence of the director during this year is of special interest 
and significance. During the past decade, preventive medicine has become one of 
the major subjects in the medical curriculum. The requirements for proper instruc- 
tion in this subject involve not only adequate laboratory and clinical facilities but 
satisfactory arrangements for the observation of the functioning of official departments 
of health and of the various volutary health and social agencies. U ith the growing 
appreciation of the importance of this subject in medical education, the need has been 



42 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

felt for a comprehensive survey of the methods at present employed in its presenta- 
tion to undergraduates in the leading medical schools of North America and of 
Europe. Provision for such a study was made by the Rockefeller Foundation and 
an invitation was extended to Dr. FitzGerald to undertake the direction of this 
important survev. To this request of the Rockefeller Foundation, the Board of 
Governors acceded with pleasure, granting to Dr. FitzGerald a year's leave of absence. 
The invitation was a further recognition of Dr. FitzGerald's outstanding leadership 
not onlv in medical research but in the whole field of medical education. 

The work of the School of Hygiene is conducted by three departments and a 
sub-department. The department of physiological hygiene is concerned with such 
aspects of environmental hygiene as ventilation and lighting, industrial hygiene, 
nutrition, and applied physiology. The department of epidemiology and biometrics 
gives its attention to the functioning of public health organisations. Instruction 
is provided in public health administration, epidemiology, vital statistics, public 
health education, and sanitation. The department of hygiene and preventive medicine, 
which is also a department of the Faculty of Medicine, provides a series of courses 
in bacteriologv. immunology, and parasitology. Associated with this department is 
the sub-department of chemistry in relation to hygiene. Important investigations 
are conducted by the members of each of these departments. These investigations 
have been made possible through the co-operation of the Connaught Laboratories. 
Substantial grants have been made each year to several of the departments and the 
facilities of the Connaught Laboratories, both the university and farm sections, 
have been placed at their disposal. The academic staffs consist largely, but not 
exclusivelv- of members of the Connaught Laboratories. This arrangement of 
personnel has been found highly satisfactory as it affords the opportunity for the 
members to engage in teaching, investigation, and administration. 

Each of the departments receives graduate and undergraduate students. Instruc- 
tion is given to undergraduate students in the Faculties of Medicine, Arts, Applied 
Science, and Household Science, and in the School of Nursing. Courses are provided 
for graduate students proceeding to the degrees of M.A., Ph.D.. M.A.Sc, to the 
Diploma in Public Health and to the Diploma or Certificate in Public Health Nurs- 
ing. During the session 1936-1937. 239 students have been enrolled in the various 
courses as follows: 

A. Graduates 

Candidates for the Diploma in Public Health 17 

Candidates for the degree of Ph.D 3 

Candidates for the degree of MA.Sc 1 

Candidates for the degree of M.A 1 

Occasional students 6 

B. School of Nursing 51 

C. Undergraduates , 

Faculty of Medicine. 5th year 113 

Faculty of Household Science, 3rd and 4th years 18 

Faculty of Arts. 3rd year 29 

Department of University Extension 

239 

Seventeen physicians proceeded to the Diploma in Public Health, constituting 
the largest class yet enrolled. Six members were from the Province of Quebec, three 
from Manitoba, three from New Brunswick, two from Ontario, one from Nova Scotia, 
and one from British Columbia. Dr. S. E. Ferreira, a member of the public health 
organisation of Jamaica, was a member also of this class. It is of interest to record 
that of the graduates in public health now numbering 164, 133 are engaged in public 
health work in Canada and 12 in other countries. Of the medical staff of the Ministry 
of Health of Quebec, 34 received their post-graduate instruction in public health 
in the School of Hygiene. 

The contribution made by the School of Hygiene in providing training for this 
large group of public health leaders in Canada is of great importance and its value 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 43 

will become increasingly evident as the years pass. As in previous years, the Rocke- 
feller Foundation has generously aided the different provincial departments of health 
by granting fellowships in public health to a number of candidates. The Connaught 
Laboratories have also made available several fellowships each year. Such assist- 
ance has been one fo the most important factors in the success of the effort to have 
well-qualified public health personnel. 

Formulation of a satisfactory course of training for sanitary engineers was com- 
pleted this year by the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering in co-operation 
with the School of Hygient, the department of biology, and the Department of Health 
of Ontario. Previously, special courses were provided in only a few essential subjects. 
During the year a trial course was arranged in which each of the departments of the 
School of Hygiene made an important contribution. The providing of this new 
course will meet a need in Canada as previously graduates in engineering desiring 
such courses could not obtain training in Canada. Of interest, also, is the provision 
of a formal course of instruction in public health education by the department of 
epidemiology and biometrics. 

The department of epidemiology and biometrics is making a substantial contri- 
bution to the improvement of vital statistics in Canada. The department has been 
privileged to assist the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in the preparation and introduc- 
tion of the new Canadian death registration certificate, and in the preparation of 
a manual of instruction for physicians, concerning death certification. A continuous 
study is being conducted of samples of certificates to determine the value of the new 
certificate. A study also of stillbirth registration has been undertaken by Dr. A. H. 
Sellers with the objective of preparing a classification of the causes of stillbirths 
for use in the special stillbirth registration certificate. Recommendations will be 
made concerning the form of this new certificate to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 
The department was invited to co-operate with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics 
and the Department of Pensions and National Health in the preparation of a clas- 
sification of the causes of morbidity. The need for an effective classification for use 
throughout Canada was at once evident in those provinces in which plans for 
health insurance were being discussed. The department has also had the pleasure 
of co-operating with the Department of Health of Newfoundland in providing a 
special course of training for the newly-appointed officer in charge of vital statistics. 

In addition to the work of the department of physiological hygiene in the investi- 
gations of hormones, vitamins, and other physiological substances, an important 
contribution is being made in industrial hygiene. Data on atmospheric pollution 
in Toronto have been obtained during the past four years and the publication of 
these findings should stimulate action toward reducing smoke pollution. The 
toxicity of trichlorethylene and carbon tetrachloride, commonly used as solvents, 
has been investigated, as well as the toxicity of a bitumistic paint. Mr. K. K. Kay 
has supplemented Dr. Barrett's investigations by studying the effect of smoke on 
the transmission of ultra-violet energy. The work in industrial hygiene is facilitated 
by the close association, in teaching and research, of Dr. J. C. Cunningham, director 
of the division of industrial hygiene. Department of Health, Ontario. In this depart- 
ment, also, important studies are being conducted in the subject of nutrition by Dr. 
McHenry under the immediate direction of Dr. C. H. Best. 

The department of hygiene and preventive medicine has accepted further responsi- 
bilities in the field of teaching and has continued to enlarge its program of research. 
The report of the various researches in this department and in the sub-department 
of chemistry in relation to hygiene are presented in the report of the acting directors 
of the Connaught Laboratories. 

Reference has been made in the report of the acting directors of the Connaught 
Laboratories to the resignations of Dr. P. A. T. Sneath, lecturer in parasitology. 
Dr. Kenneth Brandon, fellow in epidemiology, and the appointment of Dr. A. H. 
Sellers as medical statistician to the Department of Health of Ontario. Dr. Sellers, 
however, will continue to have a relationship with the department of epidemiology 
and biometrics as a part-time member. 



44 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

As is previous years, public health administrators and other students of public 
health from various countries visited the School of Hygiene. Of special interest 
was the \asit of a group representing the major teaching centres in Mexico and South 
America. Visitors have come from the following countries: Argentina, Brazil, 
Chile. China, Costa Rica, Denmark, England, France, Holland, Germany, Greece, 
the Federated Malay States, Jamaica, Korea, Manchuria, Mexico, Newfoundland, 
Switzerland, and Uruguay. 

(12) REPORT OF THE LIBRARIAN 
iW. S. Wallace, M. A.) 

I beg to submit the following report on the work of the University Library for 
the year ending June 30, 1937. 

The number of volumes added to the Library during the year has been 11,132; 
the number of pamphlets, 4,643, making the total number of accessioned volumes 
in the Library 339,261, and the total number of pamphlets, 121,909 or a grand total 
of 471,170 items. 

The following are the statistics of the use of the Library by undergraduates in 
comparison with previous years: 

1921-22 1926-27 1934-35 1935-36 1936-37 

Reading-room books 41,928 106.485 186,605 193,522 206,694 

Overnight books 18,998 39,779 107,559 111,929 111,572 

Week books 4,782 13,104 23,399 25,128 22,820 



Totals 65.718 159,278 317,541 330,579 341,086 

This represents an increase during the year of over 10,000 books handled or an 
increase of approximately three per cent. At the professors' and graduates' register 
the circulation has been almost the same as last year. The following is a statement 
showing the total circulation in the Library during recent years: 

Total circulation 1926-27 1930-31 1934-35 1935-36 1936-37 

To undergraduates 159.278 231,759 317.541 330,579 341,086 

To professors and graduates 20,000 37.388 40,843 39.425 39.437 



Totals ..179,278 269.147 358,384 370,004 380,523 

These figures are exclusive of books taken for consultation from the reference shelves, 
of which over 20,000 have been replaced by the library assistants in the main library 
during the past year; and of course they take no account of the very considerable 
circulation of books in some of the departmental libraries. 

The number of interlibrary loans continues to increase. During the year the 
Library has handled 742 interlibrary loans, as against 666 last year; 464 of these 
being books lent, and 278 books borrowed. There has also been a steady increase 
in the number of photostats and bibliofilms sent to us in lieu of inter-library loans; 
and in order to make these bibliofilms more readily decipherable by students, it will 
probably be necessary for the Library to instal a library projector. 

The following is a statement showing the circulation in the medical, political 
science. University College and law reading rooms, in comparison with other years: 

1934-35 1935-36 1936-37 

Medical reading-room: reading-room books 10.761 11.195 12,814 

over-night books 1 1.386 12,219 12,425 

week books 3.606 3,622 4,188 



Totals 25,753 27,036 29,427 

Political Science: reading-room books 12.577 11,208 9.088 

over-night books 6,890 6.338 4,865 

Totals 19,457 17,546 13,953 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 45 

University College: reading-room books 33,325 30,746 30,992 

over-night books 17.943 16.466 15,923 

Totals 51,268 47.212 46,915 

Law reading-room : reading-room books 8,822 15.585 22,985 

over-night books 2,870 4.368 4,004 

week books 251 524 373 

Totals 11,943 20,477 27,362 

One result of the steady growth in the circulation of books in the University 
Library has been to place on the binding and mending department an ever-increasing 
strain. The number of books waiting to be mended is so great as to be beyond the 
capacity of the mending department to deal with during the vacations; and the 
amount of re-binding to be done is proving a heavy strain on the appropriation for 
binding, most of which is needed for the binding of periodicals. During the past 
year the binding and mending department prepared for binding 2,825 volumes, 
mended 2,449 volumes, and placed in pamphlet binders or boards 1,241 volumes. 

The congestion of books in the stack-room of the University Library has become 
such that during the past year it was necessary for the Library Committee to ask the 
Council of the Royal Canadian Institute, whose books have for many years been 
housed in the LIniversity Library, to remove from the library building and place 
in storage elsewhere all those volumes or sets of periodicals which duplicate the 
holdings of the L'niversity Library. The Council of the Royal Canadian Institute 
has very kindly acceded to this resuest, and in this way shelving has been released 
which should provide for this year's accessions at least. But the situation is rapidly 
approaching a point where, if means are not found to enlarge the stack-room, the 
only solution will be to remove from circulation and place in storage elsewhere a 
part of the resources of the LIniversity Library. 

I regret to report that a joint inemorial of the university and college librarians 
of Canada, presented through the Secretary of the Universities Conference to the 
Minister of Customs at Ottawa, protesting against the imposition of a so-called excise 
tax on the purchase of books by University Libraries, and especially against the 
imposition of this excise tax on interlibrary loans from the LInited States, has pro- 
duced no result. I have, however, taken up the matter with the Ministers of Customs 
and National Revenue, through other channels, and I am hopeful that at the next 
session of parliament we may succeed in getting this tax removed. It is to be hoped 
at least that we shall be able to get the tax on interlibrary loans removed, since this 
is proving a great hardship to Canadian scholars and research students. 

I should like to bring again to your attention the loyal and painstaking service 
given during the past year by my assistants in the LIniversity Library, under conditions 
which, in this antiquated and over-crowded building, we are certainly growing no 
easier, as the years go on. 

(13) REPORT ON RESEARCH 

Anatomy, under direction of Professor ] . C. B. Grant 

Dr. J. C. B. Grant has completed the manuscript and illustrations for a text- 
book of Anatomy. These are now in the hands of the publisher. 

Dr. James C. Watt has studied the arrangement of the cranial venous sinuses 
in the occipital region of man in 150 cases and has sorted and classified these into 
types. A paper presenting the results of this study was read at the Toronto meeting 
of the American Association of Anatomists. 

During the session he made a series of records totalling over 600 items upon 
structures in the head and neck. These will be used for future work. 

Mr. George Watts, B.A., who is the Richardson Fellow for the present year. 
and Dr. Ham have been investigating the structure of the relativelv enormous adrenal 
gland which exists in the human foetus, with a view to determining its function. 



46 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Investigation failed to reveal comparable glands in several other species, hence 
the department is greately indebted to the departments of pathology at St. Michael's 
and the Toronto General Hospitals for material for study. There is a great deal of 
evidence to indicate that the tissue which comprises the bulk of the gland in foetal 
life is concerned with the manufacture of a sex hormone. Despite suggestive evidence 
to the contrary, extracts proved on biological assay to contain little oestrin. Assays 
for male hormone give more promise but these have just begun. Dr. Marrian of the 
department of bio-chemistry, has been extremely generous in co-operating in this 
work. 

Mr. \^'atts and Dr. Ham have also found that gonadatropic hormone stimulates 
the growth of the androgenic zone of the adrenal gland in non-pregnant mice. They 
are also investigating the effect of this hormone on pregnant animals. 

Mr. Elliott. M.A. and Dr. Ham, working under a Banting grant, determined 
the effect of different degrees of chronic vitamin C deficiency on the growth and 
survival of guinea pigs. They found that long-continued partial deficiencies resulted 
in an atrophv of the articular cartilages and particularly of their bony supports. It 
was thought that a combination of exercise and these lesions might produce those 
seen in osteo-arthritis and this is being investigated. Their studies on bone and teeth 
do not lead them to believe that vitamin C acts in the body causing a setting or 
gelation of fluid intercellular substances but rather that it is necessary for the vital 
processes of many sorts of specialised cells. Even fatty degeneration of the heart 
was produced in many cases by long continued deficiencies. 

Drs. Tisdall and Drake of the department of pediatrics and Dr. Ham of this 
department have performed joint research on the effect of various disturbances of 
the calcium and phosphorous metabolism on the calcification and structure of grow- 
ing bones and the healing of fractures. They found that certain diets prevented the 
calcification of callus — producing the X-Ray picture of non-union, — and that calci- 
fication of such a callus rapidly followed a change of diet. The histological pictures 
of low-calcium and low-phosphorous rickets were each investigated as was the one 
produced by acidosis. Further studies, particularly in regard to disturbances of acid- 
base balance and calcafication, are being undertaken. 

Dr. Ham is continuing his studies on experimental arteriosclerosis induced by 
disturbances of calcium and phosphorus metabolism. He is also investigating the 
effect of large doses of vitamin D on the structure of bone and finds that decalci- 
fication of newlv formed matrix occurs with the cell-containing matrix into osteoclast 
structures. 

In connection with fourth year B. & M. honour option course and fourth year 
option courses in medicine, several students have been working with Dr. Ham on 
research problems, many of these students spending additional time at these problems 
in the summer months. This experiment has been productive of a certain amount 
of information of value. Mr. Scott has found that massive doses of vitamin D cause 
in seventv-two hours, the formation and phagocytosis of enormous amounts of iron 
containing pigment by the reticulo-endothelial system of rats. Mr. Littner has 
found that the hypertrophy observed in the parathyroid gland in rickets can be 
reduplicated experimentally by low-calcium diets but not by low-phosphorus diets, 
indicating that the blood calcium controls the activity of the parathyroid cells. Mr. 
Lougheed is studying the changes which occur in the distal portion of a nerve three 
Aveeks after it has been sectioned. Miss H. Horner studied the effect of oestrin on 
endometrium and it has been found that an increase in cell size precedes mitosis. 
Mr. Copp and Mr. Perry have and are continuing their tissue culture work, attempt- 
ing to learn if oestrin can render available to endometrial epithelium in tissue cul- 
ture, food from media which would ordinarily not support growth. 

The American Association of Anatomists held its fifty-third annual meeting in 
the Tniversity of Toronto during Easter Thursday, Friday and Saturdav. This was 
the first time the association had met in this country. It was generally necessary 
to hold from three to six simultaneous meetings, each with a lantern, operator and 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 47 

attendants in order to cover the lengthy programme of 150 papers and 58 demon- 
strations and a great deal of preparation was required of every member of the staff 
to make the meeting successful. The registered attendance was 303. of whom 281 
were from out of town. At the close of the meeting the following resolution was 
unanimously adopted: 

"For three days the American Association of Anatomists has enjoyed the welcome 
of His Majesty's Dominion of Canada and the generously expressed hospitality of 
the University of Toronto. 

Assured by the gracious message from Lord Tweedsmuir. the Governor General ; 
warmed by the felicitous phrases of Canon Cody, the President of the University; 
cheered by the genial presence of Professor McMurrich; beset about and about by 
myriad practical expressions of efficient preparation and organisation on the part of 
Professor Grant, his colleagues and his staff, for our ease, our comfort and the inter- 
change of our scientific thought, we desire to record our appreciation and express our 
thanks to all those named and implied in this resolution. 

We would have them know that human kindliness, hospitalitv and fellowship, 
no matter how certainly anticipated or relied upon, are experiences ever shiningly 
and exhilaratingly new. In joy and this realisation we bear our witness and beg our 
hosts to accept this testimony." (This resolution was presented by Professor T. Win- 
gate Todd ) . 

Astronomy, under direction of Professor R. K. \ oung 

During the session 1936-37 one graduate student was in attendance in the de- 
partment of astronomy and completed the requirements for the degree of Master of 
Arts. Miss V. E. Foster made a photometric investigation of the spectrum of Nova 
Lacertae under the direction of F. S. Hogg. 

General Programme 

At the David Dunlap Observatory the members of the staff have co-operated in 
a general programme of observation of stars in and near the Kapteyn areas. During 
the year there have been a total of 1186 working hours at night as compared with 
1096 for last year. During this interval 1075 plates have been secured. The measure- 
ment of the plates for radial velocity has been carried out mainly by Miss R. J. 
Northcott and Miss F. S. Patterson and during the year they have measured 912 plates. 
This programme should be completed by the end of 1938. 

Spectoscopic Work 

Dr. Hogg has completed the work on two binaries, H.D. 183794. H. D. 206155 
and secured further plates for the binary H.D. 34762. The plates of the binaries 
H.D. 2.5638 and H.D. 25639 are being remeasured. Dr. Heard has completed a 
preliminary orbit of the spectrocopic binary H.D. 96528 and followed the changes 
in the spectrum of y Cassiopeiae. Dr. Millman has continued work on some 30 faint 
eclipsing binaries. During the year 33 plates were obtained with the 74-inch telescope. 
Dr. Helen S. Hogg has brought the existing card catalogue of all references to specro- 
scopic binaries up to date to facilitate planning programmes for observation. 

Newtonian Focus 

Dr. H. S. Hogg in co-operation with Dr. F. S. Hogg has secured 156 direct 
photographs of clusters bringing the total taken at this observatory to date to 246. 
In N.G.C. 6402 twelve periods have now been determined, including those for three 
long period Cepheids. A summarv of this work has been published. In N.G.C. 
6779 six new variables have been found and measured on existing plates. Work 
of period determination is under way. In N.G.C. 6205 over a thousand estimates 
on new and old variables have been made and period work started. An important 
long period Cepheid has been found in each of the clusters N.G.C. 6218 and 62.54. 
The faint but important cluster N.G.C. 6366 has been added to the observing list 
and a bibliography of the literature on globular clusters has been brought up to date. 



48 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Planetary 

A programme for the determination of the intensity distribution in the contin- 
uous spectrum for various points on the disk of Mars was planned by Dr. Millman. 
To date 28 plates on this programme have been secured. 

Meteor Research 

The photographic and visual observation of the major showers was carried out 
as in previous vears bv Dr. Millman. Three of the meteor cameras were mounted 
behind rotating shutters which occulted the lenses 25 times per second. Exposures 
totalling 83 hours were made in observing the Perseids, Leonids and Geminids. No 
meteor spectra were photographed but four direct trails were obtained with one of 
the rotating shutter cameras. Approximately 3,000 visual observations of meteors 
were viewed and summaries of these published. 

Work on fourteen meteor photographs taken with the rotating shutter at Har- 
vard Observatory was completed in collaboration with Miss Dorrit Hoffleit of the 
above institution. These direct photographs w-ere measured for velocity and studied 
photometrically. 

19-inch Telescope 

This instrument has been adapted for direct photography and tested for definition 
and ease of manipulation by Dr. Hogg and the director. No regular programme 
has yet been undertaken. 

Biochemistry, under direction of Professor H. Wasteneys 

Directed by Professor Wasteneys: 

Mr. B. F. Crocker and Dr. Paul Hamilton have continued the researches on 
the chemical aspects of digestion insitu in which Mr. Chocker was engaged last year. 
The digestion of proteins isolated from different sources has been especially studied, 
and it was found that the digestion of a given isolated protein is apparently in 
inverse proportion to the amount fed while for proteins from different sources 
the relative speed of digestion remains the same regardless of the amount. The 
investigation is proceeding. 

Directed by Professor G. F. Marrian: 

The work commenced three years ago by Dr. S. L. Cohen on the chemical nature 
of the conjugated oestrogens in human pregnancy urine was successfully completed 
last autumn l3y the isolation of the crystalline sodium salt of oestriol glucuronic acid. 
In view of the probable identity of this compound with the active principle of 
"emmenin". a careful investigation of the oestrogenic activity of the oestriol glucur- 
onide when administered orally and subcutaneously, has been carried out. It has 
been shown that oestriol glucuronide owes its activity, when administered orally, 
to the fact it is enzymatically hydrolysed in the intestinal tracts of the test animals 
with the liberation of free oestriol. This work has been carried out mainly by Mr. 
A. D. Odell and Miss D. I. Skill. 

Mr. B. Schachter has continued his research on the nature of the conjugated 
oestrogens in pregnant mare's urine. Small yields of what appears to be potassium 
©estrone sulphate have been isolated. 

Mr. W. Fishman has studied methods of prepartion and purification of the 
enzyme glucuronidase. It is hoped to make use of purified preparations of this 
enzyme for the enzymatic hydrolysis of the conjugated oestrogens in human urine. 

Mr. G. C. Butler and Professor Marrian have collaborated with Mr. L. R. 
Broster, F.R.C.S., of the Charing Cross Hospital, London, England, in a research 
on the nature of some constituents of the urine of women showing adrenogenital 
syndrome. A compound which is apparently specific for this condition has been 
isolated and it has been identified as pregnane-3.17.20.triol. It is hoped to establish 
a relationship between this compound and certain of the active principles of the 
adrenal cortex. 

Mr. Butler is also investigating the nature of a new compound which has been 
isolated from male and female urines. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 49 

Miss E. Batho has continued her work on the synthesis of equol. She has 
svnthesised 7 methoxy-3-( 4'methoxypheny ) chromane. This is apparently not identical 
with equol methyl ether. She is now engaged in synthesising 6- methoxy-2-(4' 
methoxy-benzyl I coumarane. 

Dr. D. Beall has investigated the possibility of coupling oestrone or oestriol 
with proteins. It is hoped that such a complex may possess antigenic activity and 
thus it may be possible to produce an antibody specific for the oestrin hapten. Such 
an antibady would prove of great value in the study of the physiological action 
of the oestrus-producing hormones. As a preliminary step the introduction of an 
amino group into the oestrone molecule is being studied since such a group bv 
diazotization would afford a ready method for coupling the oestrogen and protein. 

Directed by Professor A. M. Wynne: 

Dr. L. Farber continued his investigations of the growth and proteolytic activity 
of pathogenic Staphylococci. In February 1937 he left the department, having 
accepted a research position in the Lnited States. 

Mr. L. Rabinowitch continued his investigations of pancreatic lipase; com- 
parative studies of the properties and behaviour of purified and less pure prepara- 
tions of the enzyme were made. The results of this and previous work was incor- 
porated in a thesis for the degree of Ph.D. 

Professor Wynne in collaboration with Mr. G. M. Chute, Mr. J. W. Hazelton 
and Mr. B. A. Roberts continued his investigations of yeast invertase and of the 
intermediary metabolism of fermenting bacteria. 

Biology- under the direction of Professor E. M. Walker 

Then following summary includes investigations in progress, published or 
in course of publication, for the year 1936-1937: 

Vertebrate Anatomy 

By Professor W. H. T. Baillie — Conjugate deviation of the eyes in animals that 
possess either monocular or biocular vision; origin of movements of the 
eye and the relation of eye movements to a motor behaviour pattern : the 
effects of anaesthetis on eye movements; thickness of the cornea and the 
ability to refract light; study of the eye of the harbour seal; a tumour 
of the oviduct in a domestic fowl. 

Invertebrate Zoology (including entomology and parasitology^ 

By Professor Norma Ford — Determination of the number of instars and their 
diagnostic chacters in Gryllobl-atta and the rate of growth at several temper- 
atures; a survey of the distribution and abundance of the parasitic flesh-fly. 
Wohlfahrtia vigil, within a radius of fifty miles of Toronto, and a study 
of all reported cases of human cutaneous myiasis caused by this parasite. 

By Dr. F. P. Ide — Descriptions of the nymphs of 23 species of mayflies of the 
genera Baetis, Heterocloeon. Pseudocloeon and Cloeon; ecological distri- 
bution of mayflies in the Ottawa River and one of its tributaries with a 
comparison between the fauna of this region and that of the Credit River. 

By Professor E. M. Walker — Thoracic skeleton and musculature of Gryllohlalia : 
diagnostic chacters of larval stages of the parasitic fleshfly, Wohlfahrtia 
vigil: a new dragonfly of the genus Macromia from British Columbia, 
with a key to the North American species of this genus; distribution of 
dragonflies of Ontario and Saskatchewan. 

Under the direction of Professor F. M. Walker: 

C E. Atwood — Effects of different foods and of starvation on longevity, 
size, reproductive capacity and sex ratio of the Mediterranean Flour Moth 
{Ephestia kuehniella). 

Miss J. A. Eraser — Ecological distribution of certain caddisflies and their larvae 
in streams in Algonquin Park. Ontario. 



50 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Miss J. F. L. Hart — A comparative study of certain British Columbian Anomura 
(hermit crabs and related forms), based on both larval and adult structure. 

Mrs. E. Kuitunen-Ekbaun — Life history of Philonietra americana, a dracunculid 
nematode parasite of certain flounders, blennies and cling-fish; life history 
of Philonema oncorhynchi, parasitic on sockeye salmon; maturation and 
hatching of the eggs of Triaenophorus crassus, a cestode from Canadian 
fish; occurrence of various Acanthocephala in Canadian fish; intestinal 
parasits of the haddock in Canadian ^\aters. 

Miss R. D. C. Martin — Life history and ecological studies of two stream-inhabit- 
ing dragonflies, Agrion maculatum and A. aequabile. 

G. M. Neal — Distribution of pelagic Rotifera in British Columbia. 

W. B. Stalhvorthv — Distribution of land Isopoda in Ontario, a study of the 
influence of environmental factors under controlled conditions. 

F. A. Urquhart — Taxonomic position of the so-called "sand-cricket" (Tri- 

dactylus I . 

Marine Biology 

By Professor A. G. Huntsman — Factors affecting the abundance of the Atlantic 

salmon. 
Under the direction of Professor A. G. Huntsman: 
A. A. Blair — Factors affectin the growth of salmon parr and smolts, particularly 

as shown in the scales. 
P. F. Elson — Development of the scales in the trout, Salvelinus jontinalis. 
W. H. Johnson — Food and feeding of the herring; migrations in relation to 
light of the copepods Calanus, Pseudocalanus, Arcartia. Eurytemora and 
Tortanus (also at Atlantic Biological Station under the Woods Hole Ocean- 
ographic Institution I . 
H. M. Rogers — Fauna, flora and conditions of the estuary of the Margaree River, 

Cape Breton (Field work under the Biological Board of Canada). 
Mr. H. C. White of the staff of the Biological Board was given accommodation 
in the laboratory for work on the food of kingfishers and mergansers on the Mar- 
garee River, Cape Breton, and on the heritability of local behaviour in the Atlantic 
salmon. 

Vertebrate Embryology 

By Professor A. F. Coventry — Preparation of slides of developmental stages 
of small mammals continued from last year, now including fairly close 
series of specimens illustrating two species of Peromyscus, Microtus p. 
pennsylvanicus and Clethrionomys g. gapperi. 

Animal Bionomics. Mammalogy and Ichthyology 

By Professor A. F. Coventry — Continuations of studies of populations of small 

mammals in Temagami Forest Reserve; breeding habits of some Cricetidae 

in Ontario. 
Under the direction of Professor A. F. Coventry: 

G. F. M. Smith — Life conditions of oysters in the Bras d'Or Lakes of Cape 

Breton ( Field work under the Biological Board of Canada ) . 
By Professor J. R. Dymond — Ecological and geographical distribution of fishes 

in Algonquin Park, Ontario; taxonomy and distribution of salmonoid fishes 

of northwestern Canada. 
Under the direction of Professor J. R. Dymond: 
A. H. Carter — Life history of fishes of the genus Nocomis. 
C. J. Kerswill — A taxonomic and distributional study of Amphiodon and Hiodon 

( at the L niversity of Western Ontario ) . 
Miss I. Limbert — Distribution of Ontario fishes. 
J. M. Speirs — Studies of bird migration at Toronto. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 51 

Genetics of Human Biology 

By Professor J. W. MacArthur — Genetics of the tomato, Aquilegia, rodents and 

man; finger, palm and sole prints of the Morlok quadruplets; development 

of a new quantitative method of comparing and stating the degree of 

likeness of hands in their dermatoglyphic characters. 
By Professor J. W. MacArthur in collaboration with Professor Norma Ford — 

Collection and study of hand and sole prints and other data from family 

groups and from multiple births. 
By Professor J. W. MacArthur in collaboration with Dr. A, N. Langford — 

Development at Vineland Experiment Station of a commercial greenhouse 

tomato immune to brown mould. 
Under the direction of Professor J. W. MacArthur: 

L. Butler — Analysis of the mechanism of inheritance of fruit size in the tomato. 
Miss V. Engelberl — Studies of the type of reproduction, cytology and genetics 

of a group of species of blue grass iPoa spp.). 
C. K. Gunn — The acholuric jaundice mutation in the albino rat; its inheritance 

and its similarity to the human disease. 
Miss F. Harkness — Comparison of human hand and foot prints. 
Mrs. M. Richardson — Studies of intelligence quotients in problem children and 

their sibs and parents. 
A. Wilkes — Induction of mutations in parasitic Hymenoptera as a means of 

studying the causes of variations and their sex ratio. 
By Professor Norma Ford — Dermatoglyphics of the Godino united twins, who 

died in New York in November and December, 1936; physical charters 

of a case of united foetuses born prematurely in Toronto; investigation 

of the blood-vascular system in the placentae of multiple births, correlating 

the findings with the degree of similarity of the twins or triplets after 

birth. (In co-operation with four Toronto Hospitals). 

Comparative Neurology 

By Professor E. H. Craigie — Continuation of studies on the cerebral cortex of 
birds and reptiles; vascularity of the nervous system in certain represent- 
ative amphibians, reptiles and mammals; general survey of the field of 
comparative anatomy and embryology of the central nervous system. 

Under the direction of Professor E. H. Craigie: 

S. J. Taylor — Vascularity of the hypophysis of the frog and other cold-blooded 
vertebrates. 

J. V. McCutcheon — Study of the nucleus isthmi of birds. 

Limnology 

By Professor W. J. K. Harkness (in collaboration with other members of the 
staff, graduate and undergraduate students)— A limnological study of the 
lakes and streams of Algonquin Park and adjacent areas; a site was chosen 
in the Park for a limnological laboratory and the building constructed 
(in co-operation with the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests and 
Game and Fisheries ) . A transfer of Atlantic salmon was made to a series 
of fresh-water lakes in Quebec (in co-operation with Mr. Moffat Dunlap) ; 
the results of this operation may furnish significant limnological and fish- 
cultural data. 

Under the direction of Professor W. J. K. Harkness: 

C. Carl — The distribution of Cladocera and free-living Copepoda in British 
Columbia with special reference to the Centropagidae. 

K. H. Doan — Further studies on the life history and the factors controlling 
growth and production of the small-mouthed black bass in Lake St. Clair. 
Georgian Bay and Algonquin Park. 

F. E. J. Fry and W. A. Kenned> — The life history and controlling factors in 
the production of the lake trout {Cristivomer mamaycush) in inland lakes 
in Ontario. 



52 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

R. R. Langford, W. R. Martin and V. E. F. Solman — Seasonal quantitive studies 
of the distribution of the plankton population in Algonquin Park lakes 
and the effect of physical and chemical conditions and changes upon this 
distribution. 

R. B. Miller — Qualitative and quantitative study of the bottom fauna of the 
Algonquin Park lakes with special emphasis on the ecological distribution 
of the Chironomidae. 

Experimental Biology 

By Professor L. Irving — The relation of the peripheral circulation to breathing 
in mammals. 

Under the direction of Professor L. Irving: 

E. C. Black — The capacity of the blood of the carp and other fresh-water fish 
for carrying oxygen and carbon dioxide. 

L. P. Dugal — Changes in the tissues and mantle cavity of clams and oysters 
when kept in air. 

Miss E. Greey — Studies made to determine whether the base-combining power 
and quantity of the proteins in the eggs of trout change during the develop- 
ment of egg protein into the protein of the embryonic fish. 

Miss K. Robertson — Further studies on the relation of the enzyme carbon 
anhydrase to the metabolism of calcium. The effect of the enzyme has been 
studied upon the chemical reactions involved in the precipitation of calcium 
carbonate. 

Provision for these studies had been made possible by grants from the Banting 
Foundation, Ella Sachs Plotz Foundation, American Association for the Advancement 
of Science, American Philosophical Society and Rockefeller Foundation. 

Botany, under direction of Professor R. B. Thomson 

Phanerogamic Botany and Genetics 

Anatomy and Experimental Morphology 

Bannan, M. W. — A study of the variations in wood structure in the native 

Conifers, and determination of the relationships between such variations 

and the ecological conditions under which the trees grow. 
Haldenbv, C.N. — The origin and distribution of horizontal resin canals in the 

Conifers. 
Hull, Kathleen L.. & Thomson, R.B. — The anatomical organisation of Lycopodium 

and Selaginella. 
Radforth, N. W. — The development of plant embryos in culture fluid. 
Taylor, T. M. C. — The sporeling organisation and the cladorhize development 

of the adult plant in Equisetum arvense L. 
Thomson, R. B. — The comparative anatomy of the male and female cone scales 

of the Conifers. 
Thomson, R. B. & Hull, Kathleen L.- — The organisation of the sporeling of 

Osmunda and of the lower vascular plants. 
Wright, J. Gertrude — The nature of the pit-closing membrane in the higher 

gymnosperms. 

Taxonomy 

Krotkov. P. — Plant survey work in the Bruce Peninsula; revision of the herb- 
arium material ; special study of Ontario willows and golden rods. 
Taylor, T. M. C. — (1 1 A critical study of the genus Woodsia. 

( 2 ) Plant survey work in the Batchawana and Port Arthur 
areas, in co-operation with the National Museum of 
Canada. A report on the collection from the former 
area is in press, and from the latter in course of prepar- 
ation. 



UiNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 53 

Genetics 

Wright. J. Gertrude — A study of abnormal types of Linaria vulgaris and their 
heredity. 
Mycology, Forest Pathology and Crytogamic Botany 
(Under the direction of Professor H. S. Jackson) 
Biggs, Rosemary P. — A cultural study of Thelephoraceae. 

Cain, R. F. — A taxonomic study of Ontario Sordariaceae and related Sphaeriales. 

Groves, J. W. — Cultural studies of certain canker forming species of Dermatea, 

Pezicula, Godronia and related forms. ( In part submitted for publication ) . 

Jackson, H. S. — The mycological flora of the Toronto region and of the Tem- 

agami Forest Reserve. 

A taxonomic study of Ontario Thelephoraceae. 
Lacy, R. C. — Cultural studies of the Thelephoraceae. 
Lehmann, A. J. V. — A study of the nuclear phenomena of the germination of 

the teliospores of certain species of Lepto-Piiccinia. 
Macrea. Ruth — A study of phosphorescence in Panus stipicus. 

Plant Ecology and Seed Studies 

(Under the direction of Professor H. B. Sifton) 
Structural Ecology: 

McPherson, D. C. — On the structure, form and development of air spaces in roots. 
Seed Studies: 

Hamly, D. H. — Stereophotography of seeds. Apparatus has been devised for 
the preparation of Stereophotos. The use of these affords a valuable aid 
to the identification of weed seeds. 
McGugan, Miss Jean E. — The seed-coats of the genus Brassica. 

The occurrence of certain characteristic pigments in 
the cotyledons of Brassica species and varieties and 
their value in seed identification. 
Identification of Brassica seedlings 
Sifton, H. B. — Investigation of the eff^ect of water and oxygen supply, temper- 
ature and light on seed germination. 

Plant Physiology 

( Under the direction of Professor G. H. Duff I 

Brodie, Anne B. — The metabolism of nitrogen and its relation to respiratory 
metabolism. This year's work has shown that the first net loss of protein 
occurs in starving leaf cells in conjunction with the onset of the senescent 
rise of respiration. This fact is now being related to changes in respiratory 
quotient. 

Duff^. G. H. — The metabolic gradient of the attached leaf and its relation to 
the concentration and transport of sugar. 

Duff". G. H. and Forward. Dorothy F. — Sugar degradation and respiratory meta- 
bolism. The rate of inversion of the non-reducing sugar is identified as 
ihe factor controlling respiratory metabolism. 

Walford. E. J. — The respiratory metabolism of the tomato fruit in relation to 
its storage at 12.5°C. (in co-operation with the Ontario Agricultural 
College). The first paper on this subject has gone forward to the Canadian 
Journal of Research. 

Plant Pathology 

(Under the direction of Professor D. L. Bailey) 

( These researches have, except where otherwise stated, been undertaken in co- 
operation with the Vineland Experiment Station. ) 
Bailey, D. L. — Dead Arm Disease of Grape. 
Diseases of Ornamentals. 

( a I Cvtospora disease of Koster's Blue Spruce, 
(bl Suspected virus disease of lilies and gladiolus. 
Strawberry Root-rot. 



SI REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Langford, A. N. — Cladosporium leaf mold of tomato. 

Simmonds, S. A. — Factors influencing the fungus flora of raspberry roots. 

NewelL P. G. — Bacterial leaf spots of tobacco. In co-operation with the Domin- 
ion Plant Pathological Laboratory, St. Catharines. 

Woolliams, G. E. — Fusarium Wilt of Zinnia. In co-operation with the Dominion 
Plant Pathological Laboratory, Summerland, B.C. 

Mead, H. W. — ^A comparative study of some seed-borne disease of barley. 
In co-operation with the Dominion Plant Pathological Laboratory, Sask- 
atoon, Sask. 

Cytology 

(Under the direction of Dr. L. C. Coleman) 

Coleman, L. C. — Cytology of Gasteria, Allium and Scilla with special reference 

to chromosome structure. 
Hillary. B. B. — The Feulgen reaction and its use in Plant Cytology. 
Radforth, N. W. — The Feulgen nucleal stain in relation to the egg apparatus of 

Pinus and Lilium. 
Taylor, Miss G. S. — The Cytology of Veltheimia viridifolia. 

Chemistry, under direction of Professor W . Lash Miller 

Forty-five students were engaged in research last winter under the direction of 
professors of the department of chemistry. 

The degree of Master of Arts was conferred on seven of these, viz: — Sister Mary 
Evelyn Fitzierald, Messrs. E. C. Forbes, W. A. James, J. W. McCutcheon, S. Shank- 
man. D. L. Turner, and M. Wayman; also on Mr. L. R. Bryant who worked under 
Professor Ruhnke in the Ontario Agricultural College, and on Mr. S. F. MacDonald 
who worked under Professor V. E. Henderson in the department of pharmacology. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy was conferred on Mr. L. H. Cragg whose 
research was directed by Professor Kendrick; on Miss M. L. Elder who worked under 
the direction of Professor W. Lash Miller; on Mr. A. H. Heatley who worked under 
Professor Burt-Gerrans; on Mr. F. H. Lawford, who worked in the Banting Institute 
under direction of Professor C. C. Lucas; on Mr. J. R. Patton whos research was 
directed by Professor J. B. Ferguson; and on Mr. F. E. W. Wetmore who worked 
under the direction of Professor A. R. Gordon. 

The following were the subjects of research: — 

Prof. F. E. Beamish — Analytical determination of the platinum metals. 

H. J. Bernstein. M.A. — Raman effect in electrolytes. 

\^ . H. Brown — Quantitative determination of carbon-monoxide in blood. 

A. E. Byrnes — Friedel and Crafts reaction between acenaphthene and substi- 
tuted phthalic anhydrides. 

R. C. Carlisle. B.A. — Reduction of magnetite by iron. 

M. Cohen, M.A. — Adsorption of water-vapour by solids. 

L. H. Cragg. M.A. — The sour taste of acids. 

Miss E. V. Eastcott, Ph.D. — Purification of Bios IIB. 

Miss M. L. Elder, M.A. — Sporulation of yeast. 

L. D. Finlayson. B.A. — Solubility of carbon dioxide in binary liquid solutions. 

Sister Mary Evelyn Fitzgerald. B.A. — Organic salts of certain amino-acids. 

E. F. Forbes, B.A. — Effect of platinum mentals on the surface of the assay bead. 

Prof. A. R. Gordon — Computation of thermodynamic quantities from spectral 
data. 

A. H. Heatley, B.A.Sc, M.A. — Potential distribution in carbon arcs. 

W. G. 0. Hines — Potential of the lead-sulphate electrode. 

E. A. Hollingshead — Differential diffusion-coefficients of sulphuric acid in 
aqueous solutions. 

W. A. James, B.A. — Differential diffusion coefficients of hydrochloric acid. 

A. Janis. M.A. — Vapour-pressures of aqueous solutions by the isopiestic method. 

J. H. Johnston — Separation of the alcohols of sandal-wood oil. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 55 

L. F. King, M.A. — Rate? of reactions of esters with alcohols in alkaline media. 
D. J. LeRoy, M.A. — Transport numbers of alkaline acetates in aqueous solution. 
S. F. MacDonald. B. A. — Preparation of some derivatives of cyclopropane. 
J. W. McCutcheon. B.Sc. — The tetrabromides and other derivatives of linoleic 
acid. 

F. L. W. McKim — Separtion of solids by centrifuging in a neutral liquid. 
C. Marchant. M.A. — Bios VI. needed by Sacch. hansen. valbyensis. 

W. R. Mason — Base exchange with natural minerals. 

R. N. Meals, M.A. — The mechanism of the Fujiwara reaction. 

J. H. Michell — Preparation of 2-menthyl 5-menthoxy cyclohexanol. 

M. 0. O'SulIivan — Preparation of some mixed phenyl esters. 

P. P. Paisley — Prepartion of Bios IIB. 

C. H. Perrin — Determination of nitrous oxide. 

G. W. Rogers — The McHaffie-Lenher method for the studv of absorption of 

vapours on glass surfaces. 
J. R. Romans, M.A. — Photochemical reactions. 
Miss J. C. Romeyn — The sporulation of yeast. 
J. J. Russell. M.A. — Analysis of the platinum metals. 
Miss C. J. Sanderson. M.A. — Effects of the constituents of bios on the crops of 

various species of yeast. 
Miss M. C. Scott, M.A. — Determination of specific reducing agents for the various 

platinum metals. 
J. Seath — Soectrographic analysis of the platinum metals. 

S. Shankman. B.A. — Vapour pressures of aquesou solutions of sulphuric acid. 
R. S. Soanes, M.A. — Potential distribution in carbon arcs. 
Miss H. Stantial. Ph.D. — Equilibria between salts of amino-acids. 
G. A. Stewart, B.A. — Base exchange with artificial alumino-silicates. 
S. 0. Thompson, M.A. — Solubility of gases in liquids. 

D. L. Turner, B.A. — Intermediates for a hydrophenanthrene synthesis. 

C. Unruth. B.Sc. M.A. — Reactions of acid chlorides with certain polyphenols. 
W. Wayman, B.A. — Purification of Bios IIB. 

F. J. Webb, M.A. — The product of alkaline reduction of 9-nitro-anthracene. 
F. E. W. Wetmore. B.Sc, M.A. — The activity coefficient of copper sulphate in 
aqueous solution. 

Food Chemistry , under direction of Professor C.C. Benson 

Research work has been continued in this department in the study of the relation- 
ships between the process of respiration and physical training for young women, 
as such training is given in this University, and in the studies in chemical changes 
in fruits during ripening. 

Miss M. Cox has investigated especially the changes in sugars in Mcintosh Red 
apples during ripening and storage and has this year been granted the master's 
degree for her work in this connection. 

We are indebted to the Experimental Station at Vineland for their kindness in 
providing the apples which we are using in these studies of the ripening of fruit. 

Pathological Chemistry, under direction of Professor Andrew Hunter 

Drs. Urquhart, Selby and Nicholson have continued their work on kidney 
function during experimental nephrosis. Thev have made observations, which indicate 
that damage to the convoluted tubules impairs the kidney's ability to excrete water, 
nitrogen and foreign sugar, but that, on the other hand, its power to retain chloride 
is diminished. 

Dr. Jackson has been comparing ammonia production in the nephrotic and 
normal kidneys. 

Dr. Jackson and Dr. Nicholson have made further investigations on the relation- 
ship of carbohydrate metabolism and staphylococcal infection, and have found that 



56 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

the modification in the response to infection produced by high carbohydrate diets 
is probably due to an increase in the amount of sugar at the site of infection. 

Studies on the use of micro-organisms as sugar reagents have been continued, 
and during the course of these studies Dr. Nicholson has secured some evidence of 
the existence in muscle of a polysaccharide other than glycogen. 

Mr. J. B. Scott has made a study of several methods which have been proposed 
for the determination of minute quantities of iodine in blood, and has elaborated 
a new procedure which appears to possess several advantages. 

Dr. Hunter has continued his studies of the enzyme arginase with several inter- 
esting results. Among these may be mentioned the observation that arginase 
hydrolyses carbamido-arginine. One product of this hydrolysis is urea : the other has 
been isolated, and has been almost certainly identified as carbamido-ornithine, a 
substance hitherto unknown. This observation throws a new light upon the nature of 
the specific action of arginase. 

Dr. Hunter has also improved the method formerly devised for the isolation of 
free arginine from tryptic digests, and has applied the improved method to the further 
studv of the mechanism of its liberation. 

0?her problems, which h^ve been undertaken are the purification of arginase. 
and the improvement of existing methods for the preparation of ornithine. 

Geology and Palaeontology, under direction of Professor E. S. Moore 

Field investigations in geology: 

Professor A. McLean — East Kirkland Lake area, for Ontario Department of 

Mines. 
Dr. J. Satterly — Geology of the Stull Lake-Echoing River-Sachigo Lake area, for 

Ontario Department of Mines. 

Laboratory investigations : 

Dr. Madeline Fritz — A new coral genus and species from the Silurian rocks of 
Lake Timiskaming. 

A Carboniferous blastoid from Mount Coleman, Alberta. 
Illustrated catalogue of Devonian type Bryozoa of the 
family Fenestrellinidae. 
Dr. V. J. Okulitch — Revision of the nomeclature of some Archaeocyathids 
(Paleospongia). 

Twenty-five species of Devonian corals, illustrated and 
described for the Illustrated Catalogue of Devonian Fossils. 
Fletcheria incerta and Fletcheria sinclairi, new species of 
Ordovician corals. 
J. E. Armstrong, M.A.Sc. (B.C.) — Geology of the Eraser Lake area, British 

Columbia. 
H. C. Lane, M.Sc. (Man.) — The role of chlorine in the genesis of ore deposits. 
P. A. Chubb — Ore deposits at the Ross mine. Ontario. 
A. T. Griffis — Structural geology of the Kirkland Lake area. 
Dr. A. Glauser (Basle, Switzerland) — Geology of the syenite belts of the Ban- 
croft area, Ontario. 
W. M. Bartley (Man.) — Genetic relations of lamprophyres to gold deposits in 
Ontario. 

Household Science, under direction of Professor J. B. Brodie 

During the session 1936-37 five graduate students were taking work in this 
department but only three were engaged in research. 

Miss Grace H. Donald has continued her determinations of the calcium content 
of some Canadian vegetables and was granted the degree of Master of Arts. 

Miss Dorothy Mulholland completed her study of low cost special diets and 
was granted the degree of Master of Arts. 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROiNTQ FOR 1937 57 

Miss Ruth Johnstone reviewed the literature on the use of soy bean in the diet 
and worked out new methods and recipes for incorporating soy bean products in 
the dietary. She was granted the degree of Master of Arts. 

Applied Mathematics, under direction of Professor J. L. Synge 

B. A. Griffith, Ph.D.: Investigations on the flow of a viscous liquid past a fixed 
circular cylinder by a combination of the methods of Stokes and Oseen have 
now been completed. The results involve a parameter which can be adjusted 
to give values for the drag in better agreement with experiment than the 
results obtained by Oseen's method. 
G. E. Hav, M.A.: The method of images has been applied to obtain the solution 
of the torsion problem for a prism of triangular section with angles 30, 
60, 90 degrees. 
A. F. Stevenson, Ph.D.: Certain points arising out of the method of the self- 
consistent field in quantum mechanics have been investi- 
gated, namelv, the necessity for spherical symmetry 
in self-consistent atomic fields and the effect of the 
motion of the centre of gravity in nuclear problems. 
Stoke's and Oseen"s equations for the steady motion 
of a viscous liquid past an obstacle may be regarded 
as particular cases of more general equations involv- 
ing a parameter. A method for determining the best 
value for this parameter has been developed and de- 
tailed calculations for the case of a sphere are in 
progress. 
J. L. Synge, Sc.D. : Gauss' theorem, connecting normal flux of intensity of 
gravitational force across a surface with the contained 
mass, has been extended to the general theory of relativity, 
particular attention being devoted to a relativistic defini- 
tion of intensity in a gravitational field in terms of the 
relative accelerations of free particles. 
An extensive hydrodynamical theory for general relativity 
has been developed, a number of classical results being 
found to hold. In particular the propagation of disturb- 
ances has been investigated, and it has been found that 
a lower limit to the compressibility of a fluid is demanded 
by the fundamental relativistic postulate of an upper limit 
to velocity. 

A new method has been developed for investigating the 
properties of absolute optical instruments, including those 
in which the terminal media are anisotropic. 
A method developed five years ago for treating the equil- 
ibrium of a thin incompressible membrane has been ex- 
tended to cover the case where the membrane is slightly 
compressible. It is intended to use these results to give 
a more adequate account of the equilibrium of the peri- 
odontal membrane. 

Medicine, under direction of Professor Duncan Graham 

Satisfactory progress has been made in many different problems of clinical 
research. During the past few years special attention has been given to the investi- 
gation of patients suffering from acute occlusion of the larger arteries. A special 
study has been made by Dr. Rykert and the head of the department on time of onset, 
location, chacter, distribution and possible causes of the pain present in this condition, 
on the factors influencing prognosis and on the results of different methods of treat- 
ment. In reports of this investigation, attention is called to the presence and clinical 



58 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



significance of two tvpes of pain in cases of acute embolic occlusion, to the frequency 
of spontaneous recovery of the local circulation following arterial occlusion affecting 
the upper extremity, and to the importance of the associated primary disease as a 
determining factor in prognosis and treatment. The outcome in respect to survival 
of the extremity is considered in relation to medical and surgical therapy. 

An attempt has been made to find a satisfactory method for testing pumonary 
efficiency in patients suffering from different types of emphysema. Several different 
methods have been tried but none has proved of great value. This work was carried 
out by Dr. Doidge, a research fellow in medicine, working in collaboration with Dr. 
Warner. A new type of mechanical support for relief of dyspnoea in emphysema 
has been evolved by Dr. Warner. 

All cases of pulmonary abscess admitted to hospital in the past ten years have 
been reviewed by Dr. Warner with the object of determining the value of various 
forms of treatment. This review has shown that the results from present methods 
of treatment for lung abcess are unsatisfactory and indicates the need for practising 
all possible measures for its prevention. 

In an effort to make the diagnosis of subphrenic abcess at an earlier stage, Dr. 
Doidge has made a careful review of the clinical findings in all cases of subphrenic 
abcess admitted to hospital in the past ten years. 

The effects of various sulphites on the proteins have been studied by Dr. Camp- 
bell and Miss Hanna and this has resulted in the development of new methods for 
the easy separtion of albumin, globulins and fibrinogen of blood plasma. These 
methods are now being applied in the investigation of patients suffering from nephritis 
amyloid disease and other clinical conditions. A report of this work is in press. 

The investigation on the therapeutic value and the physiological action of adrenal 
cortical extract has been continued and extended this year by Dr. Cleghorn and Mr. 
Armstrong. It is encouraging to report that a number of cases of Addison's disease 
have been successfully treated by a highly potent, non-toxic extract prepared in the 
Connaught Laboratories under the direction of Dr. McHenry. A joint report on 
the properties and use of this extract, from the two departments, is in press. The 
generous co-operation of the Connaught Laboratories has made this work possible. 
Drs. Cleaver and Maltby will publish shortly a valuable paper on the results 
in cases of gastric ulcer receiving medical treatment over a period of five years or 
longer. 

Dr. R. C. Dickson is investigating the effect on the glucose tolerance curve of 
diseases of the liver and of the extra-biliary tract. He is studying also the nature 
of functional disturbances of the biliary tract. 

Three years ago Dr. Hepburn published a report on the early results following 
total ablation of the thyroid in cases of angina at rest and of congestive heart failure. 
A follow-up of these cases has shown that the late results from this method of 
treatment are satisfactory in angina of rest but not in congestive heart failure. 

Six vears ago a patient suffering from ventricular tachycardia accompanied 
by shock and vomiting which prevented the oral administration of quinidine sulphate 
was given this drug intravenously with very satisfactory results. Since then nine 
other cases of ventricular tachycardia have been treated in this manner. Six of 
the nine patients are alive for periods up to four years after the first intravenous 
injection was given. Before this treatment was initiated only one case of a series 
of seven lived longer than fifteen days after the onset of the attack. A report on the 
use of quinidine sulphate intravenously in ventricular tachycardia was presented 
by Dr. Hepburn and Dr. Rykert at a recent meeting of the American Heart Association. 
Dr. Hyland. in association with Dr. Botterell of the department of surgery, has 
made an analysis of the clinical findings in thirty cases of frontal lobe tumour. 
Evidence of the possible functions of the frontal lobe based on the clinical findings in 
this series of cases and on experimental findings in higher animals has been studied. 
A report will be published shortly. 

Dr. Warner and Dr. Dauphinee have published a report on thrombosis of the 
coronarv sinus in a case of thrombophlebitis migrans. The report is of special 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 59 



interest in that it is the first case of thrombophlebitis migrans in which the clinical 
diagnosis of thrombosis of the coronary sinus was confirmed at autopsy. 

Dr. Trevor Owen is making a clinical study on patients suffering from migraine. 
He has presented a preliminary report on the diagnosis and treatment of this 
distressing condition. 

Department of Medical Research, under direction of Professor F. G. Bmnting 

Dr. D. A. Irwin and his co-workers have continued the study of silicosis both 
as a departmental problem and in co-operation with the Silicosis Research Committee 
of the The Ontario Mining Association, and with the Mclntyre-Porcupine Mines. 
Temporary quarters have been built on the roof of the Banting Institute to enable 
the dusting of experimental animals under conditions similar to those encountered 
industrially. Special attention is being paid to possible preventive measures. 

Miss H. Williams is investigating the extent to which tissues are capable of 
leaching various silicates. 

Mr. W. M. Gray has furthered the X-ray diffraction method for the quantitative 
estimation of quartz in dust and has analysed many samples in the past year. 

Mr. H. L. Collins is engaged in the study of the effect of various compounds 
on the solubility of silica. 

Dr. L. M. Gray has made an experimental study of fat embolism. 

Dr. D. D. Bonnycastle, in co-operation with Dr. A. W. Farmer of the department 
of surgery and Dr. D. A. Irwin, has investigated the toxic substances that have been 
demonstrated in the urine of patients suffering from burns. 

With the co-operation of the department of radiology, D. W. R. Franks and Miss 
M. M. Shaw have shown a synergism between the toxic action of glyceric aldehyde 
and X-ray on tumour. 

Dr. W. R. Franks, assisted by Mr. A. Duncan, has successfully worked out the 
photoelectric analysis of certain dusts. They also found that the efficiency of the 
Konimeter parallels that of the dust retention of the lung. 

Dr. Franks and Mr. H. J. Creech synthesized a chemoantigen for dibenzanthra- 
cene and protein and studied its serological properties. The influence of this antigen 
in calling forth an immunity to the carcinogenic activity of such substances is being 
studied. 

Dr. Franks and Mr. L. D. Proctor have developed a clinical method for the 
measurement of blood glyoxalase. With the co-operation of the departments of 
medicine and psychiatry and with the technical assistance of Miss G. Mulholland, 
a clinical survey of blood glyoxalase in disease has been conducted. 

Dr. Franks and Miss Shaw are studying the influence of focal infection, and 
control of deposition of intercellular substances bv avitaminosis C, in the formation 
of the silicotic granuloma. 

In tissue culture Dr. E. M. Hearne has studied the action of various carcinogenic 
hydrocarbons with special reference to cell division. 

Dr. G. E. Hall is continuing study on the general problem of cardiovascular 
disease, in collaboration with different members of the group. 

Dr. Hall, Mr. G. W. Manning and Dr. Banting have continued the investigation 
of the effects of chronic stimulation of the vagus nerves in dogs, in relation to the 
general cardiovascular problem under investigation in the physiological division. 

Dr. Hall and Mr. Manning have studied the physiological and pharmacological 
effects of various vagomimetic drugs on the cardiovascular and upon the vagus enzyme 
systems. With Miss Lang, they have extended this study to the effects of autonomic 
stimulation upon the secretions of the pancreas, thyroid, liver and pituitary gland. 

Mr. Manning and Mr. L. Brock have devised a new^ apparatus for continuous 
intravenous injections in the unanaesthetized and unrestrained animal. They have 
likewise devised a sequence timer slip-ring-contact unit for continuous nerve stim- 
ulation in the unrestrained animal. 

Dr. Hall and Mr. Manning have continued the study of chronic and semi-chronic 
injections of acetylcholine in the study of myocardial and coronary artery disease. 



60 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

The effects of atropine and acetylcholine injections for long periods of time have 
also been investigated. 

Mr. Manning has investigated the coronary artery distribution in the hearts 
of many species of animals and has supplemented this study by preparing injected 
and cleared specimens of these hearts. 

Dr. Lucas and Dr. Hall have studied the choline esterase activity of normal and 
pathological human sera. In attempting to correlate this ensyme with the vagotonic 
state Dr. Lucas and Dr. Hall have studied the choline esterase and other esterases, 
activity of the area from many species of animals towards various substrates. Further 
work on this problem is being carried out by Dr. Hall, Miss Land and Dr. Lucas. 

Mr. Manning and Dr. Hall have studied the electrocardiographic and patho- 
logical changes resulting from experimental ligation of various branches of the 
coronary arteries in dogs. The physiological extent of such lesions has been confirmed 
by perfusion and clearing experiments. 

Dr. Hall. Dr. Banting and Dr. Cleghorn (of the department of medicine) are 
investigating the production of cardiac and gastrointestinal lesions in adrenalecto- 
mized dogs. 

Dr. Cleghorn (Medicine! and Dr. Hall are studying the electrocardiographic 
changes in experimental adrenal insufficiency following various therapeutic measures. 
Dr. Hall and Dr. Manning are studying the effects upon the heart and its responsive- 
ness to vagus stimulation and para-sympathetic drugs in the stellate ganglionecto- 
mized animal. 

Dr. Hall is studying experimental nephritis, produced by the injection of 
heterogenous sera from ducks which had received many injections of kidney tissue 
extracts. 

Dr. H. F. Richardson, Dr. B. C. Coles and Dr. Hall have studied the effects 
of intravenously injected air in relation to a general departmental problem on 
embolism. These workers have also studied the effects of injected solutions of lysol, 
soaps, etc., as are commonly used in the production of abortions. 

Dr. Hall is studying the effects of intravenously injected oxygen, nitrogen, carbon 
dioxide and air upon the gaseous exchange in the lung with the therapeutic use 
of intravenous oxygen in mind. 

Mr. J. E. Goodwin has constructed amplifying and recording units, both of the 
permanent and portable types used in these investigations. 

In conjunction with Mr. D. P. C. Lloyd, Mr. Goodwin has constructed amplifiers, 
time sequences, etc., to complete the cathoderay oscillograph unit which they have 
assembled. With this unit Mr. Lloyd has continued studies begun at Oxford on 
the physiology of abdominal ganglia as revealed by analysis of their action 
potentials following electrical stimulation. The fibre pathways through the inferior 
mesenteric ganglia have been determined. 

Mr. Lloyd is studying the action potentials of localised areas in brain and 
cord by means of the cathode ray oscillograph and stereotoxic electrode. 

Mr. Lloyd and Dr. Hall are studying action potentials of different areas in 
brain, the electroencephalogram and the general cardiovascular condition in animals 
with experimentally produced convulsions and brain lesions. 

With Dr. Alan Brown and Dr. Hawk, of the Hospital for Sick Children, Mr. 
Lloyd, Mr. Goodwin and Dr. Hall are studying the electro-encephalograms of 
epileptic and behaviour problem cases from that Hospital. 

With Professor Duncan Graham and Dr. Hyland, of the department of medicine, 
Mr. Lloyd, Mr. Goodwin and Dr. Hall are to study the electro-encephalograms of 
hospital patients suffering from migraine, epileptiform convulsions and many other 
neurological conditions. This group, in conjunction with Dr. McKenzie and Dr. 
Botterell, Avill extend their studies to brain tumour cases — correlating the preoper- 
ative electro-encephalo-gram with records taken from the exposed brain during 
operation. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 61 

Mr. H. Davidson. Dr. Banting and Dr. Hall are studying (with the co-operation 
of Dr. Duff, department of botany • the mechanism which protects certain plants from 
the toxic effects of their own alkaloids. 

Dr. C. C. Lucas, head of the biochemistry division of the department, has been 
on leave of absence since July 1st. 1936. He is working under Professor Harington, 
University College. London, England. 

Mr. L. B. Macpherson is studying the source of amino-ethvl phosphoric ester 
and the phosphatase activity in tumour tissue. 

Mr. J. K. Watson has synthesized and identified a series of new ortho silic acid 
esters of the higher alcohols. 

Mr. F. H. Lawford made a chemical investigation of the acid-fast fraction of 
tubercle bacilli. He also prepared a number of ferricvanide compounds for Dr. 
Bruno Mendel. 

Miss H. Ball has investigated the fat-splitting enzyme of acid-fast bacilli. 

In September. 1936, Dr. Bruno Mendel was appointed an assistant professor to 
the department without salary. Dr. Mendel brought his entire laboratorv equipment 
and a fund which pays for his two assistants and all other expenses in connection 
with his work. He is studying immunitv to experimental tumour. 

Mineralgy and Petrography, under direction of Dr. T. L. Walker 

Owing to the illness of Dr. Walker during the year and the impossibilitv of 
securing a suitable supply to take over some of the more advanced work the remain- 
ing members of the staff were forced to devote most of their time to routine work 
so that the principal part of what might be called research consisted in the preparation 
for publication of results that had been secured by research prior to Dr. Walker's 
absence from the laboratory. On the whole it may be said that the staff merelv 
carried on most faithfully the most urgent part of the work that they would like to 
have done. 

Professor A. L. Parsons completed a study on two-circle calculation in the 
hexagonal system of crystals. 

Professor Ellis Thomson has completed and summarised his studies on the 
telluride minerals in Canada. 

Dr. \. Ben Meen has partially completed an investigation of what appears 
to be a new mineral from the region near Bancroft, Ontario. 

Mr. W. L. Brown completed his work on luminescence in minerals and the final 
summary of his work is now ready for publication. 

Mr. A. S. Dadson has completed his studies on the relationship between the 
potential of minerals and ore desposition. and the first part of this is now being 
published. 

The fossil insects discovered bv Dr. Walker in 1933 in the amber from Cedar 
Lake. Manitoba, have been described by Dr. F. M. Carpenter of Harvard L niversity. 
Professor C. T. Brues, Harvard Lniversity, Dr. 0. A. Johannsen, Cornell Lniversity, 
Professor M. \^ . Boesel, Miama University, Dr. A. C. Kinsev, Indiana University, 
Dr. J. W. Folsom, United States Department of Agriculture, and Dr. H. E. Ewing, 
Ln'ted States Department of Agriculture. Their finished work will shortly appear 
in Lniversity of Toronto Studies, Geological Series. 

The work of the department has been further supplemented by colleagues and 
former students of Dr. Walker who as a mark of their esteem have contributed as 
shown below to "Contributions to Canadian Mineralogy" for 1936-37. 

Cooke. H. C. (Geological Survey of Canada). An L^nusual Hypersthene from 
Lake Athabasca, Saskatchewan. 

DeLury, J. S. (Lniversity of Manitoba). Diversification of Ingneous Rocks. 

Ellsworth. H. \. and Jolliffe. F. (Geological Survey of Canada). Some Recent- 
ly-Discovered Minerals of the Great Slave Lake Area. N.W.T. 

Poitevin, E. ( Geological Survey of Canada ) . Thomsonite from the Eastern 
Townships. Quebec. 



62 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Gynaecology and Obstetrics, under direction of Professor W. A. Scott 

In order to make a more extensive study of our obstetrical material, responsi- 
bility for the compilation of data on various phases of work at the Burnside has 
been made the individual responsibility of a certain number of members of the staff. 
Dr. Henderson is responsible for heart disease in pregnancy, Dr. Mann for occiput 
posterior cases. Dr. Goodwin for stillbirths and neonatal deaths, and Dr. Low for 
Caesarean section. 

The clinic for the study of all cases of suspected disproportion has been 
instituted and is under the supervision of Dr. Scott and Dr. Cosbie. Dr. Cosbie 
and Dr. Mann are carrying on the work, in the radiological department, of cancer 
of the genital tract in collaboration with the Institute of Radium Therapy. Dr. 
Cosbie and Dr. Richards have published one paper and a second is being prepared 
by Dr. Cosbie and Dr. Henderson. 

Dr. M. C. Watson, who has been given a hospital appointment in the Out 
Patient Department, is continuing his study of the female endocrines in conjunction 
with Dr. Marrian. He has published two papers on clinical aspects of his work 
and a third is in preparation. 

Dr. Henderson has continued to carry on the work for the obstetrical depart- 
ment of the combined Cardiac-Obstetrical Clinic which is conducted in conjunction 
with the department of medicine. He read a paper on this subject at the Canadian 
Medical Association last June. 

Dr. Goodwin has completed his study of the anthropological factors in relation- 
ship to labour and this is now ready fox publication. 

Department of Ophthalmology, under direction of Professor W . H. Lowry 

We have had one hundred and thirty-five specimens sent to us for examination 
and report, which is a considerable ificrease over last year. Among these there 
have been many interesting speciments which we have added to our museum. 

Dr. Johnston is continuing his investigation of the fluid obtained from the 
numerous cases of detached retina that we are seeing. 

Dr. Morgan has perfected a method of transplanting corneal tissue in rabbits 
and we are now looking for a suitable patient who is willing to allow him to trans- 
plant clear cornea to replace a scarred cornea. 

Department of Pathology and Bacteriology, under temporary direction of 
Professor W . L. Holman 

The staff has deeply felt the loss by death of its great director Oskar Klotz, 
but all have co-operated to the utmost in attempting to overcome the absence of his 
leadership. 

Dr. P. H. Greey has studied the use of sulphanilamide compounds in animals 
injected with virulent haemolytic streptococci and has co-operated with the staff 
of the Toronto General Hospital in using these substances in treatment. He has 
also done research work on the synergistic action of streptococci and staphylococci 
in progressive ulcerative lesions of the skin. The work on the isolation and growth 
of the gonococcus carried out by Dr. Greey and Dr. J. E. Josephson has advanced 
the accuracy of the diagnosis in infections with this microorganism. Dr. R. Margarite 
Price is continuing her valuable studies on tubercle bacilli and had encountered a 
number of instances of cutaneous infection which is rather rare in Canada. Her 
investigation of bovine tuberculosis in man shows in the last decade a diminution 
in the incidence, which would seem to be chiefly due to the widespread use of pasteur- 
ization of milk and to the elimination of tuberculosis in cattle. Dr. Marion Ross 
has investigated some interesting examples of cannibalism among bacteria and has 
particularly studied the problem of improving the methods of demonstrating to 
the large student classes in baceriology. The department has continued to collaborate 
with the department of pathological chemistry in the study by Dr. S. H. Jackson of 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 63 

carbohydrate metabolipm and staphylococcus infections in the skin. Dr. E. Chant 
Robertson, in co-operation with the department of paediatrics, finished her studies on 
"Low Mineral Diets and Intestinal Stasis". This constituted her thesis for the 
Ph.D. degree. 

In pathology a new method of presenting fresh surgical material to the sixth 
year students was developed this year in co-operation with the department of 
surgery. The material was shown to small groups by Dr. F. G. Kergin, fellow in 
surgery, who correlated the clinical and gross pathological findings, the microscopic 
sections of the previous day's work being demonstrated with a projection microscope 
by Dr. D. F. Moore, assistant in pathology. This proved a valuable and popular 
addition to practical teaching in the final vear. In the fifth year the interest of the 
students has been aroused by a new method of presenting the gross autopsy material. 
All the specimens from two or three complete autopsies are shown to groups of about 
fifteen students with nothing but anatomical comments, and this is followed by build- 
ing up the pathological findings through individual questions and discussions but 
the clinical historv is not divulged until the end. A similar method was found to 
be equally valuable for presenting fresh gross material in the fourth year. A 
change in our autopsy procedure has made possible the use of fifth year students, 
so that they now take a more active part in performing post mortems. 

In the field of research, in addition to those of pedagogy in pathology, a 
remarkable amount has been accomplished when the time is considered that necs- 
sarily is given by the staff to teaching and hospital routine. Dr. J. C. Paterson 
has investigated certain problems of coronary thrombosis, which he is continuing 
in Regina, Sask. with the assistance of material sent him from this department. Dr. 
R. P. Douglas, in collaboration with Dr. W. L. Robinson, has studied the filtration 
of bacteria by the spleen and has co-operated with Dr. J. Mann of the department 
of obstetrics and gynaecology in work on fibrosis of the cervix, and with Dr. H. H. 
Hyland of the department of medicine on cerebral varices. Dr. G. Lyman Duff and 
Dr. J. D. Hamilton have studied the effect of tyramine on the vascular system and 
Dr. Hamilton has also worked on the blood dyscrasias. Dr. M. 0. Klotz has carried 
out a very extensive study of the relationship of carcinoma and silicosis of the lung. 

In the division of neuropathology under the direction of Dr. Eric A. Linell there 
has been a steady increase in the amount and value of the neurological material 
for investigation and report, from sources outside the Toronto General Hospital. 
The specimens illustrating the effect of head injuries on brain tissue collected through 
close collaboration with Dr. W. L. Robinson are being documented and studied. An 
experimental investigation of peripheral nerve-suture with the use of nerve-grafts 
is being carried out in collaboration with Professor W. E. Gallic and Drs. W. S. 
Keith and J. Sullivan. Dr. R. C. Laird is studying experimentally the effects of 
X-ray treatment on areas of injured brain tissue. Dr. Mary I. Tom is continuing 
her investigation of the histological changes which accompany softenino; of the brain, 
and Dr. Linell and she are investigating the relationship of increased blood-pressure 
to changes in brain-tissue. Dr. K. G. McKenzie read a paper in Philadelphia, before 
the Harvey Gushing Society, of which he is President, on extradural haemorrhage, 
illustrated bv material from this division. 

Paediatrics, under direction of Professor Alan Brown 

A study was instituted about 1929 on the cause and means which could be taken 
for the prevention of acute summer diarrhoea which is so prevalent in Toronto during 
the months of August and September. Largely as a result of these studies, the infant 
mortality rate on the Infant Ward of the Hospital for Sick Children was reduced 
from 39 percent in September 1931 to 32 percent in September 1933, 16 percent in 
1935, and to the lowest figure of all, 14 percent in September 1936. This reduction 
in mortality is not only due to better treatment of the disease but to increased 
knowledge as to how to prevent the disease. A more efficient method for the treat- 
ment of tetanus has been evolved in the department during the past few years. From 
1924 to 1929 there were 15 cases admitted to the Hospital for Sick Children with 



64 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

only two recoveries. During the past seven years there have been 24 cases admitted, 
with no less than 13 recoveries, or over 50 percent, while two of the last three cases 
admitted have recovered. In other words, if a child develops tetanus to-day his chance 
of being saved is many times that of a few years ago. Similar results are being 
obtained with influenzal meningitis. From 1919 to 1929 there were 70 cases admitted 
to the Hospital, with only one recovery, while from 1930 to 1936 there have been 
36 cases with 10 recoveries. As shown by the records of the Hospital, the number 
of cases of rickets, a disease which can be prevented, has been reduced from 121 
cases in 1920 to only 4 cases last year. 

On the evening of January 23rd. the opening exercises of the Department of 
Psvchological Medicine were held at the Hospital for Sick Children. This is a clinic 
for the mental care and adjustment of problems during childhood. The immediate 
medical staff" is drawn from the full time staff" of the department of paediatrics. As 
is well known, many of the mental defects of adult life have their beginning during 
childhood. In fact it might be said that most mental defects in adult life have 
their beginning in childhood. To be of the greatest value, a considerable portion 
of the work of this clinic must be in the treatment of what would be ordinarily 
considered minor problems of mental adjustment which if corrected early will result 
in the development of normal happy useful citizens but if fUowed to go on in many 
cases would end with the individual in the juvenile court or even in the penitentiary. 
It is now realised that the mental care of the child is just as important as the physical 
care. 

Pliarmacology, wider direction of Professor V. E. Henderson 

The research in the department this year has been proceeding slowly. Dr. 
Lucas has further continued his studies of the absorption of iron and has contributed 
to a study of the utilisation of iron in the anaemic rat and in children, undertaken 
by the department of paediatrics. A joint paper is now ready for press. 

Dr. Rice has made a study of a rare alkaloid, corlumine, and a shore com- 
munication is in course of preparation. 

In conjunction with Mr. A. H. R. Smith, working under a grant from the 
Banting Research Foundation, an electrical method of recording pulse has been 
devised and with the aid of Dr. Rice, tested. A preliminary paper on the method is 
in course of preparation. 

In conjunction with Mr. S. F. MacDonald. a study has been made of anaesthesia 
with the dimethyl and monomethyl cyclopropanes, but unfortunately these compounds 
appear to be unstable in the animal body and show gradually increasing toxicity, so 
that our hopes of finding an improvement on cyclopropane have not been fulfilled. 

Dr. Lucas, with my aid. has been studying some of the reactions of adrenalin 
with living tissue and very interesting data have been obtained, whose interpretation 
is not at present possible but the whole study again reveals our lack of knowledge 
of the reactions of adrenalin with tissues and the mode by which it acts. This study 
will be continued. 

Physics, under direction of Professor E. F. Burton 
During the summer of 1936. Professor E. F. Burton, Professor H. Grayson 
Smith, and Mr. J. 0. Wilhelm attended the Seventh International Congress of Refrig- 
eration, held at The Hague, Holland, where a paper was presented by Messrs Gray- 
son Smith and J. 0. Wilhelm, on some of the low temperature work being done at 
Toronto, Professor Burton acted as president of Section I during the first session. 

Low Temperature Laboratory: 

The work in this division is being carried out by Professor H. Grayson Smith, 
Mr. J. 0. Wilhelm, Kenneth Mann, A. H. Woodcock, E Bromberg, H. E. Johns, and 
A. R. Clark. The problems being investigated deal with the magnetic properties of 
the superconducting state; the influence of magnetic fields on superconductors; 
measurement of specific heats of various substances at liquid helium temperature; 
and the refractive indices of liquid oxygen, liquid hydrogen, and liquid helium 
in its two states, helium I and helium II. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 65 

Spectroscopy : 

Work dealing with hyperfine structure of spectral lines has been carried out 
by M. F. Crawford. A. B. McLay. Richard Richmond. S. Bateson. and M. W. Johns. 
Dr. H. L. Welsh is continuing his investigation on the sensitive fluorescense set up 
in the vapours of other alkali metals by the sodium D line. Dr. L. B. Leppard is 
working on the absorption of light by liquid ammonia solutions of the alkali metals, 
and Dr. J. M. Anderson on the time of persistence of the metastable state of atoms. 

During the latter part of the year Dr. S. Bateson has been carrying on some 
quantitative chemical analyses, by the spectroscope, for the Connaught Laboratories, 
on determination of zinc in animal tissue, under the direction of Professor H. J. C. 
Ireton. 

Geophysics: 

Last September Dr. Gilchrist carried out some geophysical investigations for 
the Tennessee Valley Authority, testing for subterranean faults in one of their dam 
sites. This work was commented on very favourably by those for whom it was done. 

During the course of the year a request came to Dr. Gilchrist for a party to 
carry out some geophysical work which could only be done in the winter, by taking 
advantage of the fact that the lakes are frozen over and investigations can be carried 
out on the ice. In this way indications of the distribution of ore at the bottom 
of the lake can be made. In response to this request. Dr. Arthur Brant, accompanied 
by the following students who were taking regular courses in Geophysics, — IV Year 
Geology and Mineralogy. W. P. Corking and J. W. Britton, M.Sc, candidates in 
Mining Engineering, C. W. Tyson, and H. G. Waring, spent three or four weeks in 
Northern Ontario, and the results that they obtained seemed to be quite satisfactory 
to the Company interested. 

During the month of June. 1937. Dr. Gilchrist, accompanied by K. C. Mann and 
A. R. Clark of Toronto, and M. J. Innes of Saskatoon carried out geophysical investi- 
gations for another of the Northern Ontario Mining Companies. 

Colloidal Solutions: 

Under the immediate direction of Professor Burton. L. T. Newman, and Miss 
A. M. Crutcher have been carrying out separate investigations in colloidal solutions, 
the former on the problem of measurement of the absorbed ions during the coagula- 
tion of colloidal solutions, and the later on the determination of the density of 
colloidal particles. Both of these students have been awarded scholarships by the 
National Research Council for Canada for the year 1937-38. in order that they may 
carry on this work. 

Other Investigations: 

Dr. Satterly, in co-operation with G. W. C. Tait, continued his investigation on 
the distribution of velocity along inclined jets of water, and a paper under this title 
was presented at the meeting of the Royal Society of Canada at its meeting in Toronto, 
in Vlay. 

Professor H. A. McTaggart has been continuing his work of films of oriented 
molecules, and has obtained some very interesting results on ellipticity of light 
reflected from these films. 

The National Research Council of Canada gave grants to Professor Burton for 
two investigations: 

The Measurement of the Velocity of Light using an Oscillating Quartz 
Crystal, carried out by D. W. R. McKinley. 

The Electron Microscope, on which the work was carried out by C. E. Hall, 
during the first half of the year. 



66^ REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Professor C. Barnes contributed a paper to the Monthly Notices of the Royal 
Astronomical Society of Great Britain — On the Statistical Determination of the 
Masses and Parallaxes of Binary Stars. 

Under the direction of Professor H. J. C. Ireton, Mr. W. M. Gray has been carry- 
ing out an investigation on the analysis for quartz of commercial dusts, by means of 
X-rays, an investigation which was supported by the Banting Research Foundation. 

Mr. Chien-Kuo Cheng, who entered the Graduate School from the Central China 
College, Hangkow, has been carrying out very successfully, dielectric constant 
measurements on various solutions. 

Mr. W. F. Oliver ( McMaster I has been continuing his work on the crystal 
structure of condensates at low temperatures. 

During the year the following students have been pursuing their work as holders 
of Fellowships or Scholarships: 

M. W. Johns, Studentship from the National Research Council of Canada; 
L. T. Newman, Bursary from the National Research Council of Canada; K. E. Mann, 
Fellowship from the Sir John C. McLennan Bequest. 

The following former students were awarded Scholarships during the year: 

A. D. Misener — 18.51 Exhibition Science Research Scholarship — now at the 
Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge. 

L. G. Cook — The Gertrud Davis Fellowship — now at the Kaiser Wilhelm 
Institute of Chemistry, under Professor Otto Hahn, Berlin, 
Germany. 

S. Levine — The Royal Society of Canada Fellowship, 1937-38, proceeding 
to the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge. 

Physiology, under direction of Professor C. H. Best 

The introduction of new courses in biophysics and neurophysiology, conducted 
by Dr. D. Y. Solandt and Dr. E. H. Botterell, constitutes an important improvement 
in the teaching of physiology in this department. It is felt that the instruction 
given by these new members of the staff rounds out the course and fulfills a need 
which has been appreciated for some time. The success of the textbook "The Physio- 
logical Basis of Medical Practice", written by Professor N. B. Taylor and the head 
of the department, has been very gratifying. A very large share of the credit for 
the production of this book is due Dr. Taylor. The head of the department gave 
a series of eight lectures in California in May of this year. Addresses were given 
at Leland Stanford University, the University of California and at the University 
of Southern California. 

The researches on choline and on protamine insulin have progressed favourably. 
Dr. C. W. V. McCutcheon has collaborated with the head of the department in these 
investigations. Dr. H. E. Woodward has secured very interesting results on the 
effects of diets deficient in choline, and on the oxygen consumption of liver slices. 
Dr. E. Fidlar, in collaboration with the head of the technical staff, Mr. F. L. Robin- 
son, has made a large series of very important observations upon the basal metabolic 
rate and respiratory quotient of rats on diets deficient in choline. 

Mr. L. B. Jaques, in addition to completing several undergraduate courses in 
medicine, has obtained some very interesting results on the mechanism of the clotting 
of blood. 

The greater part of Professor N. B. Taylor's time during the past year has been 
occupied in preparing the text on applied physiology. Research in his section 
has been furlher handicapped by ihp loss of his two assistants. Dr. C. B. Weld and 
Dr. J. F. Sykes. Dr. R. E. Haist, having been awarded the George Brown Memorial 
Scholarship in Medical Science, came into the department in September to work 
with Professor Taylor. The loose ends of the work on calcium metabolism, which 
was interrupted last year, are being picked up. Work upon intestinal obstruction 
is also being continued, and a start has been made upon two other problems. The 
first of these is the effect of ergotoxine upon the central nervous system and peripheral 
vessels. The other study in project is the relation of the kidney to hyper-tension. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 19:U 67 



With regard to the latter problem, some time has been spent in attempts to devise a 
reliable method for the indirect determination of blood pressure in animals. 

Research work in the biophysical and neurological aspects of physiolof^v has 
been carried on by Dr. D. Y. Solandt. Dr. E. H. Botterell and Dr. C. G. Smith. Dr. 
Smith has been in the department of physiolog) for two years and has now received 
an appointment in the department of anatomy. This group has undertaken a 
variety of projects in the fields mentioned. Work on the specific effect of ionized 
calcium on the time-constants of nerve was reported at the October meeting of the 
Canadian Physiological Society in Kingston, and the clinical implications of the 
conclusions were discussed. The methods developed by Professor A. V. Hill and 
Dr. D. Y. Solandt at University College. London, for the measurement of time- 
constants in nerve have been applied to muscle, and interesting relationships be- 
tween these values and the ionic environment of the muscle fibres have been found. 
The measurement of resting heat production, contracture heat production and the 
potassium ion concentration in the fluid environment of muscle has shown hitherto 
unsuspected connections between these frctors. A method for handling and stim- 
ulating single striated nmscle fibres and observing the alternation of the muscle 
"bands", reduced in speed by stroboscopic methods, is at present being developed. 
Experiments on the time-constants of excitation of normal and regenerated mammal- 
ian nerve in the intact animal are being performed. Isolation of these nerves in a 
moist chamber specially designed for keeping them in good condition during 
extensive electrical stimulation and the registration of the electrical concomitants 
of the resulting nerve impulses have been undertaken. Apparatus has been built 
for the electrical amplification of heart sounds and electrical filters have been 
designed to cut frequency bands for this sound. This same apparatus is useful for 
stimulating deafness due to functional discrimmination against specific frenuencv 
bands. The cathode ray electrocardiograph has been used for the direct observation 
of the electrocardiogram in humans and in laboratory animals under various con- 
ditions. The application of the cathode ray tube electrocardiography has been fairly 
widespread in England and in Continental Europe, but as yet has received little 
attention in North America. 

Dr. E. T. Waters and Mrs. J. P. Fletcher have shown th^'t not only is the rate of 
assimilation of glucose in normal animals increased by intravenously injected 
fructose, as judged by glucose tolerance tests, but a marked increase is also obtained 
in completely depancreatized dogs, receivinir protamine insulin. This clearly 
shows that the fructose effect is not due to stimulation of the pancreas, but to increased 
carbohydrate activity of other tissues of the body, probably of the liver. This find- 
ing may provide a simple answer to the highly controversial question: Is fructose 
used by the diabetic patient more readily than glucose? 

Studies on ragweed pollen sensitisation have been continued by Dr. A. H. W. 
Caulfield and Dr. M. H. Brown. It has been shown that the serum of a guinea-pig 
sensitised to ragweed pollen gave positive P.K. reactions in human recipients in 
the same way a serum from a human patient, naturally sensitised to ragweed pollen. 
This is of considerable theoretical interest as indicating an identitv of antibodv in 
two widely differing species. Also, the serum of a sensitised guinea-pig and the 
serum of a human ragweed pollen patient gave unmistakably positive P.K. reactions 
in the monkey. Renewed attempts to block anaphylaxis in ragweed pollen sensitised 
guinea-pigs, by means of the carbohvdrate fraction of the pollen, have been com- 
pletely unsuccessful. Tests were conducted on the isolated uterine strip and also on 
the intact sensitised animals. 

Psychiatry, under direclion of Professor C. B. Forrar 

During the year liaison arrangements have been made with the departments 
of paediatrics, psychology and anthropology, both for the promotion of clinical 
work and the carrying on of investigations in which there are common interests. The 
department is collaborating with the Provincial Department of Health in the experi- 
mental investigation of hypoglycemic shwk in the treatment of schizophrenia, and 



68 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Wl 



,wth the department of medical research in studying the biochemistry of acute 
excitements. The staff is represented in a consulting capacity on the staff of the 
newly established clinic for child psychiatry at the Hospital for Sick Children. 

Psychology, under direction of Professor E. A. Bott 

Sixty-seven graduate students took instruction in the department of psychology 
during the past session of whom ten were enrolled from five other departments of 
the L^niversitv. Five candidates completed the requirements for the Ph.D. degree 
and eight received the M.A. degree. The names of these candidates and titles of their 
theses are as follows: 

For the degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

J. S. Glen: Ocular Movements in Reversibility of Perspective. 

Mrs. H. B. Hedman: An Examination of some Statistical and Psychological 

Principles of Factorial Analysis. 
L. L. McQuittv: An Approach to the Measurement of Individual Differences 

in Personality. 

C. R. Myers: An Application of the Control Group Method to the Problem 
of the Etiology of Mongolism. 

H. L. Pottle: An Analysis of Errors made in Arithmetical Addition. 
For the degree of Master of Arts: 

Miss Marion Charles: Motion Pictures versus direct Observation — A Study 
of Method in Social Analysis. 
T. A. Eraser: Some Factors Influencing Lateral Choice in Perception. 

Miss M. Dale Harris: A Study of the Form and Content of Earliest Memories. 

Miss Mary McFarland: An Analysis of the Social Contacts of Fifteen Pre- 
school Children. 

Miss Margaret E. Stirling: An Analysis of the Questions asked by a Group 
of Preschool Children in a Controlled Setting. 

V. S. Stevens: Prediction from Tests and Commercial School Records. 

Miss Dorothv G. Walker: The Determination of Certain Differences Between 
Successful and Lnsuccessful Students. 

D. Carlton Williams: Some Behaviour Characteristics Associated with the 
Position of Youngest in the Family. 

. Five members of the staff received appointment to instruct during the summer 
session, 1936, in American and Canadian Universities: Professor W. E. Blatz at the 
University of Hawaii. Professor W. Line at the University of Iowa, Professor S. N. F. 
Chant at Mt. Allison University, and Professor J. D. Ketchum and K. S. Bernhardt 
at the University of Toronto. Dr. K. H. Rogers was appointed during the year as 
Director of the Big Brother Association in Toronto. He will remain as special lecturer 
on our staff and will continue to assist with the work of graduate students studying 
in the field of delinquency. Dr. Donald Snygg was appointed in June to the perman- 
ent staff of the department of psychology at the L niversity of Missouri. Dr. Pottle 
will succeed him as psychologist to the Infants' Home, Toronto. Dr. McQuitty has 
served as psychologist at the Protestant Children's Home. Several other graduates 
have received appointments for work psychological in chacter, in clinics, nursery 
schools and in personnel branches in industry. Our staff and students are thus 
actively contributing in the public services. 

During the past session the staff have been engaged upon special investigations. 
Equipment for photographic registration of eye-movements in reading has been instal- 
led and Professor Bott has conducted a preliminary survey with second year medical 
students which shows wide differences in reading proficiency and the need of further 
investigation and remedial training in the reading habits of students. With the 
co-operation of the staff in physiology electrical equipment is being installed for the 
study of human encephalograms. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 69 

Professor Chant has conducted research ( 1 ) on the measurement of attitudes 
and the development of quantitative procedures for evaluating personality adjust- 
ments, (2) upon the study methods and educational adjustment of university 
students, (3) upon the causes of motor accidents and the development of safety 
programmes, which is being conducted in co-operation with the Committee on Ac- 
cident Prevention of the Canadian Public Health Association. 

In addition to his supervision with thesis problems of graduates Professor W. 
Line has assisted in the Educational Division of the Canadian National Committee 
for Mental Hygiene with the preparation of a manual for Canadian teachers dealing 
with principles of mental hygiene in the public school. 

Professor Cosgrave has inaugurated a vocational counselling service in the 
department in co-operation with a staff counsellor of a Toronto High School of 
Commerce. The necessary test materials have been compiled and twenty cases have 
been studied. A chief purpose will be the critical evaluation and improvement of 
existing procedures in the important field of vocational guidance. 

Professor Bernhardt in collaboration with the staff of the St. George's School 
has developed motion picture methods for objectively studying and measuring the 
behaviour of young children with special reference to the analysis of social situations. 

Surgery, under direction of Professor JF. E. Gallic 

The important experimental and clinical study of the effect of the administration 
of "heparin" has been continued throughout the year by Dr. Gordon Murray and his 
assistants. L p to the present this research has been financed by the Connaught Labor- 
atories which have supplied the "heparin", and by the department of psvsiology and 
the Banting Foundation which have financed special full time assistants. As the 
expense of providing heparin free to Dr. Murray has proved too great for the Con- 
naught Laboratories to bear a collaspse of the experiment has been prevented by the 
generosity and interest of Mr. J. S. McLean of Canada Packers, who has undertaken 
to finance the supply of heparin at the Connaught Laboratories until the clinical 
study is complete. This study of the action of heparin in preventing thrombosis 
and embolism in surgical patients, which was suggested by Professor Best and assisted 
and encouraged by him at all stages has indicated the great value of interdepart- 
mental consultation and co-operation. Both the departments of physiology and 
surgery see completion of the study a most important advance in scientific and 
practical clinical knowledge. 

Therapeutics, under direction of Professor R. F. Farquharson 

Dr. Neil MacGillivray was appointed research fellow in therapeutics. He has 
studied the results of therapy of all types of leukaemia treated in the medical wards 
of the Toronto General Hospital in the past ten years. An interesting report of his 
findings will be published. 

As formerly, research work in the department of therapeutics has been closely 
associated with similar activities in the department of medicine. The active study 
of the results of therapy in pernicious anaemia is being continued, as is the study 
of parathyroid tetany and its treatment by continued use of large doses of irradiated 
ergosterol. Increasing attention is being given to the studv of various endocrine 
disorders and their treatment. 

Report of the School of Engineering Research 

Following is a brief statement of the research activities of members of the staff 
in the School of Engineering Research during the past year. 

Department of Civil Engineering 
Lnder the direction of Professor C. R. Young 

The final report on the investigation of the lateral support of steel columns 
has been in course of preparation during the year. 



70 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Under the direction of Professor T. R. Loudon 

An investigation of the longitudinal stability and controllability of the single 
seat plane known as the "Pou" has been in progress. It was found that this plane 
was dangerously unstable and lacked controllability under certain gliding conditions. 
The results were published, and caution stressed in the use of this machine. 

A preliminary investigation was made to determine the rudder area required 
to bring a plane out of a spin. 

Department of Mining Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor H. E. T. Haultain 
(with W. T. Turrall) 
Studies dealing with the fundamentals of the milling of gold ores were continued, 
more particularly with the problem of size analysis of very fine particles. 

Under the direction of Professor F. C. Dyer 

(with L. F. Gauvreau and T. Brant) 
The research on the cleaning of seeds by a new application of an ore-dressing 
principle has been continued, particularly with respect to the separation of weed 
seeds on a large scale. 

Under the direction of Professor J. T. King 

(with D. P. Scott, Nipissing Mining Research Fellow) 
A research on the chemical separation of precious metals was commenced. The 
causes of disintegration of gold in the ordinary parting process were investigated, 
(with S. E. Wolfe) 
The iron-nail method of assay was studied and encouraging progress made in 
the separation by the use of additional reagents, 
(with S. E. Wolfe I 
The investigation of methods for the determination of gold and silver in cyanide 
solutions was continued. 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor R. W. Angus 

(with J. B. Bryce) 
The research conducted last year with a model of the dam at the Abitibi Canyon 
was completed and has been published as a bulletin of the School of Engineering 
Research. 

The investigation of water hammer was continued and a paper dealing with 
the subject has been presented to the Institution of Mechanical Engineers of Great 
Britain, and will be published in the Transactions of the Society. A second paper 
dealing with this subject will also be published by the American Society of Civil 
Engineers. Professor Angus has continued his investigation of this subject in 
Europe during the summer of 1937. 

(with G. R. Lord) 
An investigation of the dam at Spruce Falls has been in progress and experiments 
in connection with the investigation have been carried out in the laboratory for the 
purpose of determining what modifications should be made to avoid further erosion. 

(with G. R. Lord) 
Experimental work on cavitation and on the proper shape of the leading edge 
on a turbine blade was continued. An investigation was also made of the discharge 
coefficients for nozzles of different sizes and under various conditions. These results 
are useful in the measurement of the discharge of centrifugal pumps. 

Under the direction of Professor E. A. AUcut 
(with F. G. Ewens) 
The properties of heat insulating materials and the influence of the size and 
thickness of test specimens were further investigated. The absorption of moisture 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 71 



bv various materials was also studied and the results were published in Research 
Bulletin No. 149. 

(with D. G. Watt) 
A study was made of the transmission of heat from a heated tube to air flowin<^ 
across it at different velocities and varying angles. This study was repeated with 
a bundle of tubes, the relative heat transmission of each tube in the bundle being 
measured. 

(With B. S. Corbett) 
An investigation was made on the flow of air through a mine model having two 
main ducts and a number of cross connections. In the latter, various baffles were 
placed and the distribution of air and pressure losses were measured at different 
velocities. 

Department of Engineering Physics 

Under the direction of Professor K. B. Jackson 

The research on photographic sensitometry has been continued. 

Department of Chemical Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor J. W. Bain 
(with K. Patrick) 

The research on the constitution and properties of lignin has been continued, 
particularly with respect to the effect of ultra-sonic radiation in the depolymeriza- 
tion of lignin, the oxidation of lignin, and the xanthate of lignin. 
Under the direction of Professor M. C. Boswell 

A paper was presented at the annual convention of the Canadian Chemical 
Association, dealing with various methods for producing a catalyst for the reduction 
of sulphur dioxide to elementary sulphur by hydrogen, by carbon monoxide, and 
by carbon monoxide and steam, 
(with W. H. Rapson) 

The study was continued of methods of synthesis of methylated compounds, 
(with R. K. Her) 

A paper was presented at the annual convention of the Canadian Chemical 
Association dealing with experimental results obtained in this laboratory regarding 
the properties of hydrated nickel oxide and the relation of particle size to the 
temperature at which the hydrated nickel oxide has been heated, 
(with H. L. Sandford) 

A paper was presented at the annual convention of the Canadian Chemical 
Association dealing with experimental results obtained in this laboratory regarding 
the fractional oxidation of hydrated ferrous sulphide and the quantitative synthesis 
from it of a catalyst for the reduction of sulphur dioxide to elementary sulphur, 
(with G. P. Beal) 

A paper was presented at the annual convention of the Canadian Chemical 
Association dealing with experimental results obtained in this laboratory regarding 
the use of easily dissociated compounds of some organic bases with sulphur dioxide 
for the recovery of sulphur dioxide from gas mixtures, 
(with W. H. Rapson) 

A paper was presented at the annual convention of the Canadian Chemical 
Association dealing with experimental results obtained in this laboratory regarding 
the methods for increasing the yield of oxalic acid in the fusion of cellulose with 
sodium hydroxide. 

Under the direction of Professor E. G. R. Ardagh 
(with W. H. Bowman) 

The research into the reactions of thiophene has been continued. At the same 
time Mr. Bowman has been engaged upon an investigation of certain properties of 
the unsaturated fatty acids, and presented a paper on this subject at the Canadian 
Chemical Convention held in Niagara Falls, Ontario, in 1936. 



72 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Under the direction of Professor E. A. Smith 

The research on the relation of the adsorptive properties of silk to fibre 
structure has been continued. A paper dealing with this work will appear in the 
Canadian Journal of Research. 

An investigation of the density of water adsorbed on silk has been in progress. 

A research on the mechanism of the dyeing of silk has been continued. 

Under the direction of Professor R. R. McLaughlin 

A research on the ageing of vulcanised rubber due to the presence of copper and 
of copper salts has been in progress. 

Department of Electrical Engineering 

Under the direction of Professor H. W. Price 

A group of papers is in preparation regarding automatic regulation of rotative 
speed and alternating current frequency, and related problems. 
Under the direction of Professor V. G. Smith 
(with J. E. Reid) 

A theoretical and experimental investigation has been in progress respecting 
the division of transformer leakage reactance into primary and secondary compon- 
ents, a matter of growing importance in regard to the operating characteristics 
of certain types of transformers. 

Report on Research in the Faculty of Dentistry 

Although research has been limited through lack of funds, yet considerable 
investigation has been proceeding within the faculty. 

Of the staff members, Dr. F. M. Lott is continuing his study of the kinematics 
of the human mandible in relation to the form structure and movement of teeth, 
with special reference to the movement of the temporo-maxillary joint. In the 
department of prosthetic dentistry, the study of the adaptabibity of glass as a denture 
base is being carried further. 

In the department of periodontology. Dr. Harold K. Box reports that 700 pH 
determinations of human saliva, freshly secreted from the ducts of the parotid, 
sub-maxillary and sub-lingual glands were made. Tests of the pH of the contents 
of the gingival crevices were also made. The relationship of these findings to the 
clinical conditions present, especially erosion of enamel and calculus formation, was 
studied. The study of the extrusive influence of epidermal processes on the teeth, 
undertaken the previous year in this department, was continued. 

Dr. G. B. Shillington in the department of preventive dentistry made a study 
of the relation of vitamin C deficiency to dental disease, with special reference to 
animal experimentation, and has made considerable progress. This work was under 
the direction of Dr. A. W. Ham. Miss Doris Berry is developing a method for the 
determination of phosphatase in saliva, and is testing patients to see if there 
is any relation between phosphatase activity of the saliva, and their susceptibility 
or immunity to dental caries. 

Further investigations have been conducted by graduates proceeding to degrees 
for research. Dr. David P. Sutton has devoted half time to a study of the changes 
in the tooth and periodontium caused by sustained injury to the epithelium attach- 
ment at the base of the gingival crevice. Dr. M. N. Rockman is directing his 
attention to the subject of radiography as applied to dentistry, and in the larger field 
of radiation. Dr. R. L. Twible is giving a limited amount of time to a study of 
refractory materials, with the intention of applying it to the use of glass in making 
dental restorations. 

Two interesting studies have been inaugurated during the session. In co-opera- 
tion with the Infants' Home, a study of the control of caries in the mouth of fifty 
infants under six years of age is being carried on and these children will continue 
under observation for some years. Dr. A. S. MacGregor is assisting the department 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 73 

of preventive dentistry in making this investigation. At the Ontario Hospital. Queen 
St., Toronto. Dr. Roy Ellis has been devoting a limited amount of time to making 
a study of the relation of oral conditions to mental disease. 

We have gratefully received $200 from the Royal College of Dental Surgeons 
of Ontario and $200 from the Canadian Dental Research Foundation to assist in the 
furtherance of research work. 

Report of work carried on under the wind tunnel committee 

During the past year, from June. 1936, to June, 1937, the following work has 
been done in the wind tunnel. 

A research was conducted on the performance of the single seat plane known 
as The Pou. The results of this research were published as they were obtained, and 
undoubtedly saved many lives. 

During the winter, a research was conducted by G. S. Levy on the amount of 
rudder required to bring a plane out of a spin. A definite conclusion could not be 
arrived at but the results of the experiments were used for a thesis on which Mr. 
Levy was granted his M.A. degree. I am pleased to report that Levy proposes to go 
to Cambridge University in England to continue aeronautic work. 

Mr. P. Gooch also worked in the wind tunnel on the assembling of some appar- 
atus, this w^ork being part of that required for his M.A.Sc. degree which he obtained 
at the recent Convocation. I am very pleased to report that this candidate received 
two offers to go into designing offices of aeroplane plants in Canada. He is at present 
doing very well with the de Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd. 

The two students in the third year engineering physics course who are specialising 
in aeronautic work also did a certain amount of work in the tunnel and will be verv 
well grounded to carry on the problems of the fourth year. It is of interest to note 
that both these students are employed by the de Havilland Aircraft of Canada Ltd. 
for the summer months. 

A research is being conducted at present for the Dominion Meteorological 
Service of Canada on the calibration of thermometers at various wind speeds. 

I am also pleased to report that the National Research Council has suggested 
a problem which will be commenced — I hope at an early date. I am also hoping 
to investigate the effect of carrying canoes on aeroplane wings as is sometimes done 
in Canada. This problem has not been gone into: although the National Research 
Council did investigate the carrying of canoes strapped to the fuselage, the inform- 
ation of which has been placed at mv disposal. 



(14) PUBLICATIONS 
FACULTY OF ARTS 

Department of Anthropology 

Mcllwraith. T. F. — Recent Publications Relating to Canada: IX, Ethnology. Anthrop- 
ology, and Archaeology. (Canadian Historical Review. Vol. XVlII. No. 1. 
March 1937, pp. 111-122. 

Department of Archaeology 

Thompson, H. A. — Material in the Royal Ontario Museum of Archaeology for the 
Study of the Early History of Italy. (School, January 19371. 
The Buildings on the West Side of the Agora at Athens. (Hesperia. 1937. 
pp. 1-226). 

White, W. C. — How an Artist Saw- China in the 3rd Century B.C. (Old Lo-yang tonili 
tiles). (Illustrated London News, October 24, 1936). 



74 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Department of Astronomy 

Heard, J. F. —Gamma Cassiopeiae. (Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 31, pp. 60-62, 1937). 
Preliminary Orbit of the Spectroscopic Binary H.D. 96528. (Journal R.A.S.C, 
Vol. 31. pp. 216-218, 1937). 
Hogg, Mrs. H. S. — Variable Stars in the Globular Cluster N.G.C. 6402. (Journal 

R.A.S.C, Vol. 31, pp. 57-59, 1937). 
Millman, P. M. and Hoffleit, Dorrit — A Study of Meteor Photographs taken with a 
Rotating Shutter. (Tercentenarv volume of Harvard College Observatory 
Annals, 1937). 
Millman, P. M. — Meteor Photography. (Amateur Telescope Making — Advanced, 
pp. 544-555, 1937). 
Meteor News. (Journal R.A.S.C, July-June, 1936-1937). 
The Frequency Distribution of the Intervals Betiveen Meteors. (Publication 

of A.A.S., Vol. 8, p. 249, 1936). 
General Instructions for Meteor Observing. (Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 31, pp. 

255-272. 1937). 
Two Unusual Auroral Displays observed from the Dunlap Observatory. (Journal 
R.A.S.C, Vol. 31, pp. 244-245, 1937). 
Stilwell. W. Y{.—The Spectroscopic Binary H.D. 34762 (Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 30, 

pp. 212-214, 1936). 
Young, R. K. — The Spectrum of Nova Lacertae. (Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 30 pp. 
209-211, 1936). 
Silvering the 74-inch Mirror. (Journal R.A.S.C, Vol. 31, pp. 1-3, 1937). 
Description of the Buildings and Equipment. (Pub. D.D.O., Vol. 1, No. 1, 56 pp.) 
The Building of a 19-inch Reflecting Telescope. (Amateur Telescope Making 
—Advanced, pp. 376-392,' 1937 ) . 

Department of Biology 
Black. E. C and Irving, L. — The Oxygen Capacity of the Blood of Fresh-Water Fish. 
(Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 36. 1937). 

A Convenient Type of Tonometer for the Equilibration of Blood. (Jour. Biol. 
Chem., Vol. 118, No. 2, April, 1937). 

The Effect of Carbon Dioxide upon the Oxygen Capacity of the Blood of the 
Carp. (Cyprinus carpio L.) (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., section V, May, 1937). 
Black, E. C, Fry, F. E. J. and Elson, P. F. — A Note on the Effect of the Increased 
Carbon Dioxide Content of Water on the Buoyancy of the Anaesthetized 
Guppy. Lebistes reticulatus {Peters). (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., section V, 
May, '1937 ) . 
Craigie, E. JJ. — The cerebral cortex of the ostrich iStruthio). (Jour. Comp. Neur., 
Vol. 64, pp. 389-41.S, 1936). ' 

Notes on cytoarchitectural features of the lateral cortex and related parts of the 
cerebral hemisphere in a series of reptiles and birds. Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., 
Ser. 3, Sec. V, Vol. 30, pp. 87-113, 1936). 

Recollections of my life. By Santiago Ramon y Cajal. (Translated from the 
Spanish.) (Amer. Philos. Soc. Memoir VHI, 638+xi pp., 1937). 
Dymond, J. R. — Life History Notes and Growth Studies on the Little Brown Bat, 
Myotis luc'fugus lucifugus. (Can. Field Nat., Vol. 50, pp. 114-116). 

New Records of Ontario Fishes. (Copeia, No. 1, 1937). 

Some Freshwater Fishes of British Columbia. (Report of Commissioner of 
Fisheries of British Columbia for 1935, p. L 60-73. Reprinted as Con- 
tribution No. 9 of the Royal Ontario Museum of Zoology. ) 
Ford, Miss N. — Further Observations on the Behaviour of Wohlfahrtia vigil (Walk.) 
with Notes on the Collecting and Rearing of the Flies. (Jour. Parasit., Vol, 
22, pp. 309-328, August, 1936 ) . 

Grylloblatta (Culture Methods for Invertebrate Animals, a Compendium Pre- 
pared Co-operatively by American Zoologists, p. 282, Comstock Publishing 
Company, 1937). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 75 

Ford, Miss N. and LeRay, W. — Amoeba, Paramecium, Planaria, Enckytraeid Worms, 

Mealworms {Blapstinus moestiis and Tenebric molitor). (Culture Methods 

for Invertebrate Animals, a Compendium Prepared Co-operatively by 

American Zoologists, pp. 74-75, 120, 153, 193, 463, Comstock Publishing 

Company, 1937 I . 
Fry, F. E. ].— Creel Census of a Seasons Angling for Lake Trout. ( Huntin<^ and 

Fishing in Canada, Vol. 3, No. 5, May, 1937) . 
Fry, F. E. J. and Kennedy, W. A. — Report on the 1936 Lake Trout Investigation, 

Lake Opeongo, Ontario. (Publications of the Ontario Fisheries Research 

Laboratory, Vol. LIV, University of Toronto Studies, Biological Series, 

No. 42, 1937). 
Huntsman, A. G. — The sucker iCatostomus commersonii) in relation to salmon and 

trout. (Trans. Amer. Fisher. Soc, Vol. 65, pp. 152-156, 1936). 
Return of salmon from the sea. I Bull. Biol. Board Canada, No. 51, 1936). 
Report of the Margaree salmon and trout investigations for 1396. (Ann. Rep. 

BioL Board Canada, 1936, pp. 4445, 1937). 
Migration and Homing of salmon. (Science, Vol. 85, pp. 313-314, March, 1937 ) . 
Huntsman, A. G., Battle, H. I., Jeffers, A. M., Jeflfers, G. W., Johnson, W. H. and 

McNairn, N. A. — Fatness, digestion and food of Passamaquoddy young 

herring. (J. Biol. Board Canada, Vol. 2, pp. 401-429. 1936). 
Ide. F. P. — The significance of the Outgrowth on the Prothorax of Ecdyonurus venosus 

Fabr. \Ephemeroptera) . (Canadian Entomologist, October, 1936). 
The Subimago of Ephoron leukon Will., and a discussion of the Imago instar 

iEphem.). (Canadian Entomologist, February, 1937). 
MacArthur, J. W. and MacArthur, 0. T. — Finger, palm and sole prints of mono- 

zygotis quadruplets. (Journal of Heredity, Vol. 28, pp. 147-153, 1937). 
Piersol, W. Y{.— Abstracts. (Biological Abstracts, Vol. 10, Nos. 8, 9; Vol. 11, No. 1). 
Walker, E. M. — A New Macromia from British Columbia iOdonata Corduliidae^ . 

(Can. Ent., January. 1937, Vol. LXIX, pp. 5-13). 
The Larval Stages of Wohlfahrtia vigil [Walker). Jour. Paras., April. 1937, 

Vol. XXIII, pp. 163-174). 

Department of Botany 

Biggs, Miss R. P. — Dipodascus uninucleatus. ( Mycologia, Vol. 29, pp. 34-44, 1937). 
Cormack. R. G. H. — The Development of Root Hairs by Elodea canadensis. (New 

Phytologist, Vol. XXXVI, No. 1, 1937 ) . 
Groves, J. W. — Ascocalvx Abietis and Bothrodiscus pinicola. (Mycologia, Vol. 28. 

pp. 451-462, 1936). 
Three Dermateaceae occurring on Nemopanthus. (Mycologia, Vol. 29, pp. 

66-80, 1937 ) . 
Langford, A. N. — The Parasitism of Cladosporium fulvum Cooke and the Genetics 

of Resistance of it. (Canadian Journal of Research, Vol. 15, No. 3, March, 
1937). 
Putnam, D. F. — Comparative Studies in Potato Virus Diseases. (Canadian Journal 

of Research, Vol. 15, No. 3, March, 1937). 
Radforth, N. W. — The Development in vitro of the Proembryo of Ginkgo. (Trans. 

Royal Canadian Institute, Vol. XXI, Part I, 1936)'. 

Department of Chemistry 

Beamish, F. E., Russell, J. J. and Seath, J. — The determination of Gold. (Journal 

of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Analytical Edition, April 15th, 

19371. 
Cragg, L. H. — The Relation between Sourness and the pH of the Saliva. I Trans. 

Roy. Soc. Can., Sec. Ill, p. 3], 1937). 
Elder, Miss M. L. — The Preparation of crude Bios V, and its influence on the 

reproduction of certain micro-organisms. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. Ill, 

pp. 89-97, 1936). 



REPORT OF THE No. 12 



Ferguson, J. B., Musgrave, J. R. and Patton, J. R. — The Base-Exchanging Properties 

of Synthetic Alumino-Silicate Materials, I. (Canadian J. Research, B. 14, 

pp. 243-254, 1936). 
Ferguson, J. B., Lloyd, B. A. and Thompson, S. 0. — Equilibria in Liquid Systems 

containing Furfural. (Canadian J. Research, B. 15, pp. 98-102, 1937). 
Ferguson, J. B. and Patton, J. R. — The Base-Exchanging Properties of Synthetic 

Alumino-Silicate Materials, II. (Canadian J. Research, B. 15, pp. 103-112, 

1937). 
Fero'uson, J. B. and Wood, E. E. — Notes on the Preparation and Composition of 

Wustite Phases. (J. Wash. Acad. Sc, Vol. 26, pp. 289-293, 1936) . 
Gordon, A. R. — The Free Energy of Electron Gas. (Journal of Chemical Physics, 

Vol.4, p. 678, 19361. 
The Free Energy of Hydrogen Cyanide from Spectroscopic Data. (Journal of 

Chemical Physics, Vol. 5, p. 30, 1937). 
The Free Energy of Diatomic Carbon Vapour. (Journal of Chemical Physics, 

Vol. 5, p. 350, 1937). 
Gordon, A. R. and Wetmore, F. E. W.^ — The Activity Coefficient of Copper Sulphate 

in Aqueous Solution. (Journal of Chemical Physics, Vol. 5, p. 60, 1937). 
Kenrick, F. B. — A Method for Sorting Micro-organisms under the Microscope. 

(Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Section III, p. 31, 1937). 
Martin, W. H., Bernstein. H. J., Romans, R. G. and Howden, 0. H. — Romans Effect 

in Electrolytes. (Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada, Series III, 

Section III, Vol. XXX. 1936 1 . 
Miller, W. Lash— Wildiers' Bios. ( Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. Ill, pp. 99-103, 1936) . 

Department of Classics 

Norw ood. G. — Classical Section in Canadian Letters. ( University of Toronto, 
Quarterly, May, 1937). 
Self-Improvement. (Western Mail, August 21st, 1936). 
Cicero the Modern. ( Western Mail, October 27th, 1936) . 
A Raven in the Jungle. (Western Mail, November 13th, 1936). 
Revieu of Carleton Stanley's "Roots of the Tree". (University of Toronto 

monthly, December, 1936 ) . 
Born out of One Time. (Western Mail. January 13th. 1937). 
Verse — Exercise. (Saturday Night, March 27th, 1937). 
Robertson. H. G. — Dike and Hybris in Aeschylus' Suppliants. (Classical Review 
July. 1936). 

Department of English 

Birnev. E. — English Irony Before Chaucer. (University of Toronto Quarterly, June, 

1937). 
On Proletarian Literature. (The Link, organ. W.E.A. of Can., Vol. I. No. 3, 

May, 1937 I . 
Proletarian Literature: Theory and Practise. (Can. Forum, May, 1937). 
Suan Song. iA. E. Housman) . (Can. Forum, January, 1937). 
Grey Rocks. (Can. Forum, March. 1937). 
Slug in Woods. (Can. Forum, February, 19371. 
Revieu of W. A. Deacon's "Literary Map of Canada". (Canadian Forum, 

January, 1937). 
Review of William Faulkner's "Absalom, Absalom!" (Canadian Forum, 

February, 1937 I. 
Review of David Grayson s "A Countryinan's Year." (Canadian Forum, 

February, 1937 ) . 
Review of Lois Reynold's "Nellie McNabb", etc. (Canadian Forum, February. 

1937 ) . 
Review of Aldous Huxley's "The Olive Tree". (Canadian Forum, March. 1937). 
Review of C. Day Lewis' "The Friendly Tree." (Canadian Forum, April, 1937). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 77 

Review of R. M. Fox's "Smoky Crusade.'^ (Canadian Forum. June, 1937). 
Review of Val. Kateav's "Peace is where the Tempests Blow." (Canadian 

Forum. June. 1937 ) . 
Review of Edward Newhouse's ''This is Your Day." (Canadian Forum, June 
1937). 
Davis, H. — Criticism from Oxford and Cambridge. ( University of Toronto Quarterly, 
Vol. VI, pp. 282-290). 
Review of Swift's "Marriage to Stella" by Maxwell Gold. (Modern Philology, 

Vol. XXXIV. pp. 434-435 ) . 
Review of "Jonathan Swift: his Mind and Art" by R. Quintana. (Philological 
Quarterly, Vol. XVI, pp. 187-188 ) . 
Kirkwood, Mrs. M. M. — The Thought of Aldous Huxley. (University of Toronto 

Quarterly, January, 1937 ) . 
Macdonald, J. F. — Introduction for ''The Talisman" by Sir Walter Scott. ( Mac- 
millan's series, St. Martin's Classics). 
Introduction and notes for "The Vicar of W^akefield" by Oliver Goldsmith. 
(Macmillan's series, St. Martin's Classics). 
MacGillivray, J. R. — A Survey of the Arts in Canada {1936); Fiction (University 

of Toronto Quarterly, April, 1937 ) . 
Woodhouse, A. S. P. (with others) — Letters in Canada, 1936. (University of Toronto 
Quarterly, April and July, 1937). 

Department of French 

Assie, G. L. — An approach to French pronunciation. (University of Toronto Press, 

1937). 
Walter, F. — Lnanimism and the Novels of Jules Romains. (Publications of the 

Modern Language Association of America. Vol. LI, No. 3. September, 1936). 
The French Popular Front at Work. (Saturday Night, September 5th, 1936). 
From Human to Humane in the Modern French Novel. ( University of Toronto 

Quarterly, Vol. VI, No. 2. January, 1937 ) . 
French Novelists of Today: Notes for a Background. ( New Frontier. September, 

1936). 
Jules Romains. ( New Frontier, October. 1936 ) . 
Eugene Dabit. (New Frontier, November. 1936). 
Andre Malraux. ( New Frontier, January. 1937 I . 
Louis-Ferdinand Celine. ( New Frontier. February. 1937 ) . 
Jean Giono. (New Frontier. March, 1937). 
Houpert, J. A. — Le Sentiment religieux chez Maurice Barres. f Le Canada Francais, 

Quebec. February, 1937). 
Lettre du Canada. (Le Lorrain, Metz (France), August 29th. 1936. November 

23rd, 1936, February 20th, 1937, April 20th, 1937 ) . 
JJne Nouvelle France dans la Nouvelle Angleterre. (Je Suis Partout. Paris, 

April 3rd, 1937). 

Department of Geogr.\phy 

Taylor. G. — Aryan, German, Nordic, Jew. (University of Chicago Magazine, Sep- 
tember, 1935 ) . 

Geography, the Correlative Science. (Can. Jour. Econ. & Pol. Sc, November, 
1935). 

Fundamental Factors in Canadian Geography. (Can. Geog. Mag., March. 1936). 

Geographic Approach to Europtan History. ( Annual Report Hist. Assoc, 
' Ottawa, March, 1936). 

Zones and Strata Theory — a Biological Classification of Races. ( Human 
Biology, Baltimore, September, 1936). 

Topographic Control in the Toronto Region. (Can. Jour. Econ. & Pol. Sc, 
November. 1936). 



78^ REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Structural Basis of Canadian Geography. (Can. Geog. Mag., May, 1937). 
Environment and Nation, 571 pp. 147 maps. (Universities' Presses of Toronto 
and Chicago, September, 1936 1 . 

Department of Geology 

Fritz, Miss M. A. — Multisolenia, a new genus of Palaeozoic Corals. (Journal of 
Palaeontology, April, 1937 ) . 

Mesohlastus haynesi from Mount Coleman, Alberta. (Transactions Royal Can- 
adian Institute). 

Illustrated Catalogue Devonian Type Bryozoa. (Wagner Free Institute, Phila- 
delphia) . 
Moore, E. S. — Gold Deposits of the Afton-Scholes Area, Ontario. (The Canadian 
Mining and Metallurgical Bulletin, September, 1936). 

Geology of the Ramore Area, Ontario. (Ontario Department of Mines Report, 
Vol. 45, Part 6, 1936). 
Okulitch, V. J. — Some Chazyan Corals. (Trans. Royal Society of Canada, Section 
IV, Vol. 30, 1936). 

On the genera Heliolites, Tetradium, and Chaetetes. (American Journal of 
Science, Vol. XXXII, November, 1936). 

The Black River Group near Montreal. ( Contributions to the Study of Ordovic- 
ian of Ontario and Quebec. Memoir 202, Geological Survey, Canada ) . 

Streptindytes chaetetiae, a neiv species of Parasitic Annelid found on Chaetetes 
radians. (American Midland Naturalist, Vol.17, No. 6, November, 1936). 

Some changes in nomenclature of Archaeocyathi, iCyathospongia) . (Journal 
of Palaeontology, April, 1937). 

Some Devonian Auloporoids from the Ohio Valley. (American Midland 
xNaturalist, April, 1937). 
Okulitch, V. J. and Albritton, C. — Malonophyllum, a new Tetracoral from the Permian 
of Texas. (Journal of Palaeontology, Vol. 11, January, 1937). 

Dep.\rtmfnt of German 

Boeschenstein, H. — Zu Ludwig Thomas Andreas Vost. (The Germanic Review, 
Vol. XI, No. 3). 

Department of History 

Brown, G. W. — The Founding of Victoria College. (On the Old Ontario Strand: 
Victoria's Hundred Years, Toronto, Victoria University, 1936). 
Canada and the United States. (Canada: The Empire and the League, Toronto, 
Thomas Nelson and Sons, 1936). 

Creighton, D. G.—The Crisis of 1837. (The Canadian Banker, April, 1937). 

Glazebrook, G. P. deT.— British Neutrality. ( Saturday Night, October 24th, 1936 ) . 

Department of Italian and Spanish 

Buchanan, M. A. — Literary History. (Transactions of the Royal Society of Canada, 

1936 ) . 
Bibliographical Notes (Hispanic Review, Vol. V, 1937). 
■Cano, J. and Craigie, E. H. — Recollections of my Life by Santiago Ramon y Cajal. 

Translated from the Spanish Recuerdos de mi vida. (Memoirs of the 

American Philosophical Society, Vol. VIII, 638 pp., Philadelphia, 1937). 
Goggio, E. — A Review of "Alfieri", a Biography by Charles R. D. Miller. ( Italica, 

Vol. XIII, No. 4, December, 1936). 
Shaw, J. E. — Bibliography of American Studies in Italian. (Italica, September and 

December, 1936; March and June, 1937). 
American Bibliography for 1936: Italian. (Publications of the Mod. Lang. 

Assoc, of America, Vol. LI, Supplement). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 79 



Department of Law 

Auld, F. C. — The Canadian Abridgement. (Volume VI, Buildings to Cemeteries; 

Vol. VII, Certiorari to Chattel Mortgages; Vol. VII, Choses in Action to 

Companies; Annual Volume for 19J6. Burroughs and Co. (Eastern). 

1936-1937). 

Legal Education. (The Bell Yard. 1936). 

The Common Lauyer and the Civil Laic. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal 

pp. 119 ff.).' 
Medical Jurisprudence. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 196 flf . ) . 
Ciiil'sation and the Lau. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 211 flf.). 
Finkelman, J. — Administrative Law.. (4 Encyclopedia of Canada, 1936). 
Industrial Lau. (4 Encyclopedia of Canada, 1936). 

Laiv of Picketing in Canada. ( 2 L niversity of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 67 ff. ) . 
Trade Vnion Law in Canada. (14 Canadian Bar Review, pp. 715 ff . ) . 
Conspiracy and Intimidation. (15 Canadian Bar Review, pp. 106 ff . ) . 
Picketing.^ ( The Link, 1936 ) . 
Ontario Mimmum Wage Act. ( Publications of the Industrial Law Research 

Council of Canada, 1937). 
Labour Relations Boards. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 22 ff . I . 
Law of Damages. (2 L niversity of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 210 ff. ). 
Boycott in English Law. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 212 ff . ) . 
Contributory Negligence. (2 I niversity of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 214 ff . I . 
Conspiracy and Breach of Contract. (15 Canadian Bar Review, June, 1937). 
Gage, J. M. — A Problem in Vesting. (2 L niversity of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

13 ff.). 
Gray, K. G. — The Mental Hospitals Act, 1935. (2 L niversity of Toronto Law 
Journal, pp. 103 ff.). 
The Medical Exanvnation of Prisoners. (15 Canadian Bar Review. May, 1937). 
Legal Responsibility of a Medical Health Officer. ( Canadian Public Health 

Journal. February. 1937 I . 
What Constitutes an Indigent Patient. (The Canadian Hospital, February, 1937). 
Puplic Health Administration in Ontario. (Home and School Review. September 

1936). 
An Inquiry into the Prognosis in the Neurosis. ( Journal of the A.M. A., August, 

1936). 
Crime and Sexual Development. (American Journal of Psychiatry. September, 

1936). 
Keeping your Child Normal. (American Journal of Psychiatry, March, 1937). 
Kennedy, W. P. M. — The Constitutional Law of Australia. (50 Harvard Law Review, 
pp. 147ff.). 
Aspects of Canadian Law. (49 Juridical Review, pp. 2 ff.). 
Basic Concepts of Law. ( Scots Law Times, December, 1936 ) . 
The Preparation for the Study of Law. (Scots Law Times. January, 1937). 
Legal Studies. (Scots Law Times, February, 1937). 
Annual Survey of Constitutional and Administrative Law. (Canadian Historical 

Review% September, 1936). 
Suits by and against the Crown. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

137 ff.). 
British "Possession" in Law. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 114 ff . ) . 
Constitutional Law of Canada. (4 Encyclopedia of Canada, pp. 22 ff.). 
Canada and the Abidication Act. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

112 ff.). 
Legislative Poiver in Australia. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

17 ff.). 
Constitutional Law of the In'ted States. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, 
pp. 196 ff.). 



80 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Divorce and its Problems. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 209 ff. ). 
Government of the British Empire. (English Historical Review, June, 1937). 
Judges and Law Reform. (23 American Bar Association Journal, pp. 298 ff . ) . 
The Oris^in of Specific Performance. (23 American Bar Association Journal 

pp.'^Seff.). 
Federal Justice. (19 Juridical Review, June, 1937). 

The British North America Act. (15 Canadian Bar Review, June. 1937). 
Literature of Criminal Law. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 199 ff.). 
Constitution of India. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 204 ff.). 
Libel and Slander. ( 2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 213 ff". ) . 
Mackenzie, N. A. M. — Thoughts on W^orld Affairs. (Canadian Comment, 1936. pp. 

3 ff . I . 
Japan and the Far East. ( Toronto Canadian Club \ ear-Book, 1936, pp. 324 ff.) . 
Canadian Foreign Policy. (Canadian Comment, 1936, pp. 3 ff.). 
Canada and the Far East. (Canada. The Empire, and the League, Toronto, 1936, 

pp. 57 ff.l. 
The PrivY Council and the Treaty-Power. (Saturday Nisht, April 1, 1937, pp. 

2 ff.). 
Documents of International Affairs. (American Journal of International Law, 

1937, pp. 192 ff.). 
Literature of International Law. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 

206 ff.)'. 
Canada and the Treaty-Power. (British Year-Book of International Law, 1937). 
The King and Governors. (New York University Quarterly Law Review, May, 

1937). 
The Gold-Clause. (American Bar Association Journal, June, 1937). 
The St. Lawrence Deep-Waterway. (16 International Affairs, pp. 146 ff . ) . 
The Treaty-making Power in Canada. (15 Canadian Bar Review, June, 1937). 
The Privy Council and recent Social Legislation. (2 Industrial Law Research 

Council of Canada, 1937, Bulletin No. 2). 
Conflict of Laws. (2 University of Toronto Law Journal, pp. 122 ff . ) . 

Department of Mathematics 

Beatty, S. and Murdoch, D. C. — Fundamental Exponents in the Theory of Algebraic 
Numbers. ( LIniversity of Toronto Studies, Mathematical Series. No. 3, 
pp. 3-36). 
Brauer, R. and Nesbitt, C. — On the regular representations of algebras. (Proceedings 
of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 23, No. 4, 1937 ) . 
On the modular representations of groups of finite order, I. (University of 
Toronto Studies, Mathematical Series, June, 1937). 
Coxeter, H. S. M. and Todd, J. A. — A practical method for enumerating co-sets of a 
finite abstract group. (Proc. Edinburgh Math. Soc. Vol. 2, No. 5. pp. 26- 
34, 1936). 
On Schldflis generalisation of Napier's Pentagramma Mirificum. (Bull. Cal- 
cutta Math. Soc, Vol. 28, pp. 123-144, 1936). 
Regular Skew polyhedra in three and four dimensions, and their topological 
analogues. (Proc. London Math. Soc. Vol. 2, No. 43, pp. 33-62, 1937). 

Department of Applied Mathematics 

Stevenson. A. F. C. — Successive approximations in Quantum Mechanics. (Trans. 

Roy. Soc. Canada, Vol 30, pp. 75-83, 1936). 
Spherical symmetry of self-consistent atomic fields. (Phys. Rev. Vol. 51, pp. 

285-287, 1936). 
Correction due to motion of centre of gravity in the Hartree approximation in 

nuclei. (Phys. Rev., Vol. 51, p. 590, 1936). 



k 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 81 

Synge, J. L. — Equivalent particle observers. (Nature. Vol. 138. 1936, pp. 28-29). 
Tensorial methods in dynamics. (University of Toronto Studies. Applied Maths. 

Series. No. 2, 1936). 
Limitations on the behavious of an expanding, universe. (Trans. Roy. Soc. 

Canada. Section III, Vol. 30^ pp. 165-178, 1936). 
Integral electromagnet theorems in general relativity. ( Proc. Rov. Soc. A, 

Vol. 157. pp. 434-443, 1936). 
On the connectivity oj spaces of positive curvature. (Quarterly Journal of Math- 
ematics. Vol. 7, pp. 316-320, 1936). 
Geodesies within matter. (Nature. Vol. 139. p. 156. 1937). 
The stability of quadratic velocity-distributwns for an inviscid liquid flowing 

between parallel planes. (Journal of Mathematics and Physics. Vol. 15. 

pp. 205-210, 1936). 
Hamilton's method in geometrical optics. (Journal of the Optical Society of 

America. Vol. 27, pp. 75-82, 1937) . 
Hamilton's characteristic function and Bruns' eiconal. ( Journal of the Optical 

Society of America, Vol. 27, pp. 138-144, 1937). 
A criticism of the method of expansion in powers of the gravitational constant 

in general relativity. (Proc. Roy. Soc. A. Vol. 160, pp. 187-189. 1937). 
Points of congestion in the peridontal membrane. (Phil. Mas., Vol. 23. pp. 

885-897. 1937). 
What mechanics owes to Descartes. ( Address to the Mathematics and Physics 

Section of the Ontario Education Association ) . 

Department of Mineralogy 

Baker. J. M. — Sericite from the Taylor-Windfall Mine. B.C. (University of Toronto 
Studies, Geological Series. 1937 ) . 

Brown, W. L. — Luminescence in Minerals. (University of Toronto Studies, Geo- 
logical Series, 1937 ) . 

Dadson, A. S. — A Potential Series of Some Minerals from the Tim' shaming District. 
Ontario. (University of Toronto Studies, Geological Series. 1937). 

Meen, V. B. — The Temperature of Formation of Vein Quartz and Some Associated 
Minerals. (University of Toronto Studies, Geological Series, 1937). 

Parsons, A. L. — Two-Circle Calculation in the Hexagonal System. (American Min- 
eralogist, 1935). 

Thomson, E. — The Minerals that Surround Ls. Presidential Address. (Proceedings 
of the Royal Canadian Institute, 1936). 
A Review of the Occurrence of Tellurides in Canada. (University of Toronto 
Studies. Geological Series. 1937 ) . 

Department of New Testament Literature 

Michael, J. H. — Har-Magedon. (The Journal of Theological Studies, Vol. XXXVIII. 
No. 150, pp. 168-172, April, 1937). 

Department of Philosophy 

Brett, G. S. — William fames and the American Ideals. (University of Toronto 
Quarterly, January, 1937 ) . 
Review: "Nouveau traite de Psychologie" Tome iv par Georges Dumas. (Philo- 
sophical Review, November, 1936 1. 
Review: "Essays in Ancient and Modern Philosophy" by H. W. B. Joseph. 
(Philosophical Review, March. 1937). 
Line, J. — Catholic Theology and Modern Culture. Re view- Article based on the works 
of Jacques Maritain. (Willett. Clark and Co.). 
Chapters I and 2, entitled The Philosophical Background and the Theological 
Principles in the volume "Toward the Christian Revolution." (XX'illett. 
Clark and Co. ) . 



82 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

MacCallum, H. R. — Contemporarx Aesthetic Theory. ( University of Toronto Quart- 
erly, July, 1936). 

Department of Physics 

Annetts, Miss M. — The Digestion Products formed by the Action of Papain on Egg 

Albumin. (Biochem. Jour., Vol. XXX, No. 10, p. 1807, 1936) . 
Barnes, C. — On the Statistical Determination of the Masses and Parallaxes of Binary 
Stars. (Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Vol. 97, No. 6, 
p. 454, 1937 ) . 
Braaten, E. 0. and Leitch, J. D. — The Use of a Geiger-Miiller Counter for Detecting 
Small Amounts of Radium stored in Radium Workers. (Jour, of In- 
dustrial hygiene and Toxicology, Vol. 19, No. 5, p. 193, 1937). 
Burton, E. F. and Mann, K. C. — Influence of Magnetic Fields on Persistent Currents 
in Supraconducting Single Crystals of Tin. (Nature, Vol. 139, No. 3512, 
p. 325, 1937). 
Burton, E. F. and Turnbull, L. G. — Dielectric Constants of Solids at High Frequencies 
and the Influence of Water of Crystallization on Dielectric Constant. ( Proc. 
Roy. Soc. Lond., Series A, Vol. 158, No. 893, p. 182, 1937 ) . 
Crawford, M. F. — Atomic Spectra. (Reports on Progress in Physics, The Physical 

Society, Vol. Ill, p. 369, 1937). 
Crawford, M. F.. McLay, A. B. and Crooker, A. M. — The Spectrum of Trebly-Ionized 

Lead, Pb Iv. (Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond., Series A, Vol. 158, p. 455, 1937). 
Croocker, A. M. — The Hyper fine Structure of Lead III. (Canadian Journal of Res. A, 

Vol. 14, p. 115,1936). 
Dockerty, S. M. — The Specific Heat of Copper from 30° to 200° K. (Canadian 

Journal of Res. A, Vol. 15, p. 59, 1937). 
Haurwitz. B. — On the Structure of Tropical Cyclones. ( Quar. Journal of Royal Met. 
Soc, Vol. LXII, p. 24.5, 1936). 
Lineare V erdnderlichkeit des Austauschkoefiizienten und tdglicher Temperatur- 

gang. (Meteorol. Zeitschr., Vol. 53, 1936 ) . 
Symmetry-points in the air pressure. (Trans. Amer. Geophys. Union, 17th 

Ann. Meet., 1936). 
The Physical State of the Upper Atmosphere. (Journal Roy. Astron. Soc. of 
Canada, October, 1936 - February, 1937; University of Toronto Press, 
1937). 
Vber die Eigenschtvingungen einer gweifach geschichteten Atmosphdre und die 

atmosphdrischen Gezeiten. (Meteorol. Zeitschr., Vol. 54, 1937). 
Total Radiat'on on Mount Washington. (N. H. Monthly Weather Rev., Vol. 
65, 1937). 
Haurwitz, B., Fergusson, S. P. and Brooks, C. F. — Eclipse Meteorology, with Special 
Reference to the Total Solar Eclips of 1932. (Trans. Amer. Geophys. 
Union, 17th Ann., Meet., 1936 ) . 
Mann, K. C. and Wilhelm, J. 0. — The Influence of Magnetic Fields on Persistent 
Currents in Superconductors, I. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Third Series, 
Section HI, Vol. XXXI, p. 19, 1937). 
Middleton, W. E. K. — The Apparent Colour of Lights at Night: with an Observation 
of ''Blue Fog:' ( Quar. Journal of Roy. Met. Soc, Vol. LXII, p. 473, 1936) . 
Photometric Discrimination with a Diffuse Boundary. (Journal Opt. Soc. Amer., 
Vol. 27, p. 112, 1937). 
Middleton. W. E. K. and Millar. F. G. — Tem,peraturc Profiles in Toronto. (Journal 

Roy. Astron. Soc. of Can., p. 265, 1936). 
Satterly, J. — Sir John Cunn-ngham McLennan, K.B.E., F.R.S. (Proc. Phys. Soc, 
Vol. 48, p. 924, 1936). 
The Physical Properties of Solid and L'quid Helium. (Revs, of Modern Physics, 

Vol.8, p. 347, 1936). 
Latent Heat of Evaporation of Liquid Helium. (Nature, Vol. 139, p. 472, 1937). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 83 

Satterly, J. and Levitt, J. R. — A Study of the Phenomena Associated with a Vertical 

Jet of Mercury. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Third Series, Section III, Vol. 

XXX, p. 129, 1936). 
Parabolic Water Jets. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Third Series, Section III, Vol 
XXX, p. 137, 1936). 
Silberstein, L. — Discrete Spacetinie. A course of Five Lectures delivered in the 

McLennan Laboratory. (University of Toronto Studies, Physics Series, 

1936). 
Discrete Spacetinie. A Kinemato graphic View of the Physical World. (Based 

on a course of five lectures delivered at the University of Toronto in 

January, February, 1936, and published in the Physics Series of the 

University of Toronto Studies, 1936). (Science Progress, Vol. XXXI, 

p. 626, 1937). 
Smith, H. G. — Resistance of a Superconductor in the Intermediate State. (Trans. 

Roy. Soc. Can., Third Series, Section III, Vol. XXXI, p. 31, 1937). 
Smith, H. G. and Wilhelm, J. 0. — Distribution of Magnetic Field around Simply 

and Multiply Connected Supraconductors. (Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A, Vol. 

157, p. 132, 1936.) (Abridged paper also in Actes du Vile Cong. Internal. 

du Froid, Vol. 1, p. 482, 1937). 

Department of Political Economy 
Diss, Miss I. M. — The Contracts of the Hydro-Electric Commission of Ontario. (The 

Economic Journal, September, 1936). 
Bladen, V. W. — The Trend of Economics. ( Dalhousie Review, July, 1936). 
Brady, A. — The Ontario Hydro-Electric Power Commission. (Canadian Journal of 
Economics and Political Science, August, 1936). 
The Third Reich. (University of Toronto Quarterly, January, 1937). 
Social Studies in Canada. ( University of Toronto Quarterly, April, 1937) . 
Drummond, W. M. — International Trade Agreements, the Canadian Viewpoint. (New 
Jersey State College of Agriculture, New Brunswick, N.J.). 
The Marketing of Whole Milk. (Ontario Milk Producer, June, July, 1937; 

Canadian Journal of Economics and Political Science, August, 1937). 
Part III of The Dairy Industry in Canada. (The Ryerson Press, Toronto and 
\ ale University Press, 1937 ) . 
Innis, H. A. — The Dairy Industry in Canada. (Toronto, 1937, pps. V-XXIX, pp. 1-11, 
248-272 ) . 
A Note on Recent Publications on the Fur Trade. (Canadian Journal of 

Economics and Political Science, pp. 562-573, November, 1936). 
More books on the Canadian Far North. (Canadian Historical Review, pp. 431- 

471, December, 1936). 
Reindeer Trek. (Canadian Historical Review, pp. 194-198, June, 19.36). 
Mining. (Encyclopaedia of Canada, Vol. IX). 
Pulp and Paper Industry. { Encyclopaedia of Canada, Vol. X) . 
Jackman. W. T. — The Railuav Problem To-day. (The Financial Times, Nov. 13, 
1936; The Gazette, Montreal, Nov. 9, 1936). 
The Recapitalisation of the Canadian National Railways. ( The Gazette, 
Montreal Feb. 24, 1937; The Globe and Mail, Feb. 25, 1937; The Gazette, 
March 20th, 1937; April 9, 1937). 
Perold, J. G. — The Rochdale Plan of Consumer Cooperation. (Workers' Educational 
Association of Canada, Study Circle Pamphlet, No. 1, pp. 20). 
The Philosophy of the Cooperative Movement. (Social Welfare, pp. 134-137, 
December, 1936). 
Parkinson, J. F. — Central Banking in Canada, Bulletin No. 64. (Canadian Credit 

Institute, 12 pp., September. October, 1936). 
Plumptre, A. F. W. — Economic and Political. (Canadian Journal of Economics and 
Political Science, February, 1937, Newfoundland). 
Review of current Canadian economic literature. (Economic Journal: Journal 
of the Royal Economic Society, March, 1937 ) . 



84 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Department of Psychology 

Bernhardt, K. S. — Protein Deficiency and Learning, in Rats. (Journal of Comparative 
Psychology, Vol. 22, pp. 269-272, 1936). 

Phosphorus and Iron Deficiencies and Learning in the Rat. (Journal of Com- 
parative Psychology,' Vol. 22. pp. 273-276, 1936 ) . 

Vitamin A Deficiency and Learning in the Rat. (Journal of Comparative 
Psychology, Vol. 22, pp. 277-278, 1936). 

Who should go to College? ( Canadian School Journal, Vol. 14, No. 10, 1936) . 

Bott, E. A. — Review of E. S. Conklins "Principles of Abnormal Psychology" 
(Revised). (Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 33, No. 7, pp. 569-574, July, 
1936). 

Chant, S. N. F. — Useful Reading Habits. (Canadian School Journal, August, 1936). 

Chant, S. N. F. and Salter, M. D. — The Measurement of Attitude toward War and 
the Galvanic Skin Response. (Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 
XXVlll. No. 4, pp. 281-2S9. April, 1937). 

Cosgrave, G. P. — Training the Worker. (Industrial Relations, pp. 20-26, Queen's 
University, 1936 ) . 

Cosgrave, G. P. and Stevens, V. S. — The Planning of Group Programs. (Ontario 
Vocational Guidance Association, Bulletin 32, June, 1937). 

Line, W. — Learning as Doing. (British Journal of Psychology, Vol. XXVII, Part 
2, pp. 162-169, October, 1936. co-author). 
Education and Mental Hygiene. (The School, Vol. XXV. No. 8, pp. 647-649, 
April, 1937, co-author ) . 

Snygg. D. — Maze Learning as Perception. (Journal of Genetic Psychology, Vol. 49, 
pp. 231-239, 1936). 

Department of Semitics 

McCulloush. W. S. — The decline of Easter in Liberal Christianity. (Journal of 
Religion. Chicago. July, 1937). 
Review of: '\4 History of Jeiiish Literature'', Vol. Ill, 1750-1880, by M. Wax- 
man. (The New Scholarships, Washington, July, 1937). 
Meek. T. J. — Hebrew Origins. (Harper and Brothers, New York and London, 1936). 
The Junior Bible. Contributor. (Macmillan, New York and London, 1936). 
Notes on the Early Texts from Nuzi. ( Revue d'Assyriologie, Vol. XXXIV, 

59 ff.). 
Review: "The Assyrian Laws.'' by Driver and Miles. (University of Toronto 

Law Journal. Vol. II, 180 ff. ) . 
Revieiv: "Governing Palestine." by J. M. Machover. (University of Toronto 
Law Journal. Vol. 11. 184 ff. ) .' 
Staples. W. E. — A Note on an Inscribed Postsherd. (Palestine Exporations, French 
Quarterly Statement, July, 1936 ) . 
The Book of Ruth. (The American Journal of Semitic Languages and Litera- 
tures, April, 1937). 
Tavlor. W. R. — A Second Forgery of the Balustrade-Inscription of Herod's Temple. 
(Journal of the Palestine Oriental Society, Vol. XVI, No. 1, 1936) . 
New Samaritan Inscriptions from Gaza. (Journal of the Palestine Oriental, 

Society, Vol. XVI, No. 2). 
Aramaic Gospel-Sources and Form-Criticism. (Canadian Society of Biblical 
Studies. Bulletin No. 2, 1936 ) . 
Winnett, F. V. — A Study of the Lihyanite and Thamudic Inscriptions. ( University 
of Toronto Studies, Oriental Series, No. 3, the University of Toronto Press, 
1937 1 . 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 85 

FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

Department of Anatomy 

Cates, H. A. — The Twelve-day Old Baby. (Human Biologv. pp. 433-450. September, 
1936). 
Fourth and Fifth articles of a series on ^'Hoiv Muscles Act." (Journal of 
Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy. Toronto). 
Ham, A. — Physiology and Economics. The Human Body. (Canadian Forum, Sep- 
tember, 1936). 
A contribution to the second edition of Cowdrys Text Book of Histology. 

(Portion relating to bone). 
Histological changes in groiving bones produced by various experimental 
metabolic disturbances. (Abstract, Anatomical Record, Vol. 67. Supple- 
ment No. 3, March 25, 1937) . 
Menstruation. (University of Toronto Medical Journal, April, 1937). 
Watt, J. C. — The arrangement of the cranial venous sinuses in the occipital region in 
man. ( Proceedings of American Association of Anatomists, Anat. Rec, 
Vol. 67, No. 4, Supplemental No. 3, March 25th, 1937). 

Department of Biochemistry 

Beall. D. — Dissolved notrogenous materials in the effluent of pilchard reduction 

plants. (J. Biol. Bd. Can.. Vol. IIL No. 2, 1937). 
Brown. A. W. A. — Studies on the excreta of a grasshopper [Melanoplus Bivittatus 

Say). (J. Experi. Biol., Vol. XIV, No. 1, pp. 87-94, January, 1937). 
Brown. A. W. A. and Farber, L. — On the deaminating enzyme of flesh-fly larvae. 

(Biochem. J.. Vol. XXX, No. 7, pp. 1107-1118, 1936). 
Butler, G. C. and Marrian, G. F. — The isolation of pregnane-s.l7 .20-triol from the 

urine of uomen showing the adreno-genital syndrome. (J. Biol. Chem.. 

Vol. 119, 1937). 
Cohen. S. L.. Marrian. G. F. and Odell. A. D. — Oestriolglucuronide. (Biochem. J., 

Vol. XXX, p. 2250, 1936 ) . 
Freed. VI. and Wynne. A. M. — Determination of hydroxyl groups in organic com- 
pounds. { Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Vol. 8, p. 278, Julv 15th, 

1936). 
lanatieff. V. and Wastenevs, H. — Phosphatase distribution in some higher plants. 

(Biochemical Journal, Vol. XXX, No. 7, pp. 1171-1182, 1936). 
Lawson. M. J. — The carbohydrate metabolism of the kidney. (Biochem. J.. Vol. 

XXX, No. 11, pp. 1996-2003, 1936). 
Marrian, G. F. and Butler, G. C. — The hormones. (Ann. Rev. Biochem.. 1937). 
Odell. A. D. and Marrian, G. F. — A Note on the presence in human pregnancy urine 

of an acid-hydrolysable combined form of pregnandiol. (Biochem. J., Vol. 

XXX, p. 1.533, 1936). 
Odell, A. D.. Skill, D. I. and Marrian, G. F. — The oestrogenic potency of orally 

administered oestriolglucuronide. (J. Pharm. Exp. Therap., 1937). 
Schachter. B. and Marrian. G. F. — Observations on the conjugated oestogens in the 

urine of pregnant mares. (Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. & Med.. Vol. 35. p. 222, 

1936 ) . 



Department of Pathological Chemistry 

Harding. V. J., Nicholson, T. F. and Archibald, R. M. — Some Properties of the 
Reducing material in Certain Fractions of Normal Urines — /. The nature 
of the "free'^ fermentable sugars and the fermentable sugars produced on 
hydrolysis in ''fasting" urines. (Biochem. Jour.. Vol. XXX, p. 326. 1936). 



86 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Harding, V. J., Nicholson, T. F. and Jackson, S. H. — Some Properties of the Reducing 
Material in Certain Fractions of Normal Urines — //. (a) The effect of 
certain "type meals'^ on the "hydrolysable sugar" in urine. ( b ) Some 
further evidence as to the nature of the hydrolysable sugar in urine. 
(Biochem. Jour., Vol. XXX, p. 335, 1936). 

Hunter, A. — Modifications of MarshalVs Clinical Method for the Determination of 
Urinary Urea. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 36, p. 616, 1937). 

Hunter, A. and Pettigrew, J. B. — A. Manometric Method for the Enzymatic Deter- 
mination of Arginine. ( Enzymologia, Vol. I, p. 341, 1937). 

Nicholson, T. F. — The Use of Some Micro-organisms in Sugar Analysis. II. The 
quantitative differentiation of fructose and mannose. (Biochem. Jour., 
Vol. XXX, p. 1804, 1936 ) . 

Department of Medicine 

Armour, R. G. — Clinical disturbances of sleep. ( Bull. Academy of Medicine, Toronto, 

Vol. IX, p. 24S, 1936). 
Epilepsy in general practice. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol. 

XXXVI, p. 160, 1937). 
Campbell. W. R. — Fundus manifestations in metabolic diseases. (University of 

Toronto Medical Journal, Vol. XIV, p. 92, 1937). 
Campbell, W. R.. Fletcher, A. A. and Kerr, R. B. — Protamine insub'n in the treatment 

of diabetes mellitus. (Trans. Assn. Am. Phys., Vol. LI, p. 161, 1936). 

(Amer. Jour. Med. Sc, Vol. CXCII, p. 589, 1936). 
Cleghorn, R. A. — The adrenal glands: a review of laboratory and clinical studies. 

(Canadian Public Health Journal, Vol. XXVIII, Part I, p. 88; Part II, 

p. 136, 1937 ) . 
Cleghorn, R. A., Cleghorn, S. M. M., Forster, M. G. and McVicar, G. A.— Some 

factors influencing the survival of rats after adrenalectomy and the suit- 
ability of the young rat for testing the potency of adrenal cortical extracts. 

(Jour, Physiol., Vol. LXXXVI, p. 229, 1936 K ' 
Cleghorn, R. A. and McVicar, G. A. — High Potassium diet and the survival of 

adrenalectornized rats. (Nature, Vol. CXXXVIII, p. 124, 1936). 
Cleghorn, R. A., McHenry, E. W. and McVicar, G. A. — The adrenal cortical extract 

requirement of the cat. (Proc. Canadian Physiol. Soc, Canadian Med. 

Assn. Jour., Vol. XXXVI, p. 81, 1937). 
Fletcher, A. A. — Chronic arthritis. (Bull. Acad. Med., Toronto, Vol. IX, p. 272, 

1936). 
Fletcher, A. A. (with Hench, P. S., Rochester, Minn., Bauer, W.. Boston, Christ, 

D., Los Angeles, Hall, F., Boston, and White, T. P., Charlotte, N.O — 

The problem of rheumatism and arthritis. { Third Rheumatism Review ) . 

(Ann. Int. Med. Vol. X, p. 754, 1936). 
Grah'^m. D. — Diseases of the blood vessels. (Oxford Medicine, Vol. II, 1937). 
Embolism and thrombosis of the larger arteries: their diagnosis and treatment. 

(Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol. XXXVI, p. 33, 1937). 
Undergraduate instruction in medicine. (Jour. Am. Med. Coll., Vol. XI, p. 213, 

1936 ) . • 
Hyland, H. H. — Myasthenia gravis: results of treatment in six cases. (Canadian 

Medical Association Journal, Vol. XXV, p. 372, 1936). 
Aphasia. ( University of Toronto Medical Journal, Vol. XIV, p. 49, December, 

1936 ) . 
Hyland, H. H. and Farquharson, R. F. — Subacute combined degeneration of the 

spinal cord in perniciou.s anaemia; results of treatment in 74 consecutive 

cases with certain clinical observations. (Arch. Neurol. & Pschiat., Vol. 

XXXVI, p. 1166, 1936). 
Maltby, E. J. — Some observations on glycine metabolism in patients suffering from 

myasthenia gravis. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol. XXXVI, 

p.' 272, 1937). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 87 

McPhedran, W. F. and Owen, T. — Diagnosis and treatment of duodenal ulcer. 

(Lancet, Vol. I. p. 260. 19371. 
Oille, J. A. — Problem of heart disease in adults. (Canadian Public Health Journal, 

Vol. XXVII. p! 261, 1936). 
Differential diagnosis of Pain in the Chest. ( Interstate Post Graduate Medical 

Society of America, October 12th meeting, 1936). 
Owen. T. — Relationship between general medicine and psychiatry. (Canadian 

medical Association Journal. Vol. XXXV, p. 557, 1936). 
Difficulties in the differentiation between "anxiety states" and hyperthyroidism. 

(Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol'. XXXVI, p. 500, 1937). 
Trow. E. J. — Simple Inflammations of the Skin. (Academy of Medicine, Section of 

Medicine, January 12th, 1937 ) . 
Oriental Sore — Report of a Case. (Archieves of Dermatology and Syphilology, 

June, 1936). 
A Dermatologist Revieivs His Practice — A Summary of Three Thousand Cases. 

(Canadian Medical Association, June 24th, 1937). 
Warner. W. P. and Dauphinee, J. A. — Thrombosis of a coronary venous sinus in 

a case of thrombophlebitis migrans. (Amer. Heart Jour.. Vol. XII. p. 483. 

1936). ■ 
Wrong, N. M. — Hodgkin's disease of the scalp. (Arch. Dermatol. & Syphilol.. Vol. 

XXXIII, p. 259, 1936). 

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

Henderson. D. N. — Pregnancy Complicated by Rheumatic Heart Disease. ( Cana- 
dian Medical Association Journal, October, 1936 ) . 

Scott, W. A. — Pregnancy After the Removal of Both Ovaries. (American Journal 
of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St. Louis, Vol. 32, No. 6, p. 1067, December, 
1936). 

Department of Ophthalmology 

MacDonald, A. E. — Choroidal Chorionepithelioma. (Transactions of the American 
Ophthalmological Society, Vol. XXXIV, 1936). 

Department of Oto-Laryngology 

Burnham, H. H. — Headache from the Nasal Wall. (Annals of Otology, Rhinology 
and Laryngology, March, 1937). 

Department of Paediatrics 

Barraclough, W. W. — Mental reactions of normal children to physical illness. 

(American Journal of Psychiatry. Vol. 93, No. 4, p. 865, January, 1937). 
German Measles Encephalomyelitis. ( Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 36, No. 5, 

p. 511. May, 1937). 
Bernhardt. K. S. — Protein Deficiency and Learning in Rats, Phosphorus and Iron 

Deficiencies and Learning in the Rat. Vitamin A Deficiency and learning 

in the Rat. (Jour. Comparative Psychology, Vol. 22, No. 2, October, 1936). 
Boyd, Miss G. — Protamine Insulin. (Jour, of Ped.,'Vol. 9, p. 417, October, 1936). 
Drake. T. G. H. — Rules and Regulations of an 18th Century French Hospital. (Can. 

Med. Assoc. Jour.. Vol. 35, p. 85, 1936 ) . 
Comparison of the Antirachitic Effects on Human Beings of Vitamin D from 

Different Sources. (Amer. Jour. Dis. Child.. Vol. 53, No. 3, p. 754, March, 

1937). 
Drake, T. G. H.. Tisdall. F. F. and Brown. A. — A Comparison of the Antirachitic 

Effect of Irradiated Cholesterol and Cod Liver Oil. (Jour. Ped., Vol. 9, 

p. 421, October, 1936 ) . 
The Antirachitic Value of Irradiated Yeast in Infants. (Jour. Nutrition, Vol. 12, 

p. 527. November. 1936). 



88 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Johnston. Miss M. M.. Williams, C. H. M., Anderson, P. G., Drake. T. G. H., Tisdall, 

F. F. and Kaake. M. J. — Lactobacillus, Acidophilus in Dental Caries. 

(Jour. Am. Dental Assoc. Vol. 23. p. 1493, August, 1936). 
Robertson. Mrs. E. C. — Recent Work on the Tissue Changes in Vitamin A Deficiency. 

(Amer. Jour. Med. Sci., Vol. 192. No. 3, p. 409, September, 1936). 
Intestinal Stasis due to Low Mineral Intake. (Amer. Jour. Dis. Child., Vol. 53, 
p. 500, February, 1937 ) . 
Robertson. Mrs. E. C. and Dovle. Miss M. E.—The Higher Resistance of Rats 

fed Casein than those fed Vegetable Proteins. I Proc. Soc. Exper. Bio. & 

Med.. Vol. 35, p. 374. 1936). 
Ross. J. R. and Brown. A. — Lead Poisoning in Children and its Prevention. (Bulletin 

Trimestriel, Vol. IV. No. 13, 1937. Geneva ) . 
Silverthorne, N. — The Presence of the Meningococcus in the Nasopharynx of Normal 

Individuals, and the Bactericidal Property of Blood against the 

Meningococcus. (Jour, of Ped.. Vol. 9, p. 328. September. 1936). 
Continuous Intravenous Method of Serum Administration. (Jour. Ped., Vol. 

9, p. 717, December. 1936). 
Bactericidal power of blood and protection against meningogoccal infection. 

(Journal of Immunology). 
Silverthorne, N. and Eraser, D. T. — Comparison of the Bactericidal Action of Human 

and Guinea-Pig Blood on Strains of the Meningococcus with the Mouse- 

Mucin Test for Virulence. (Jour, of Immunology, Vol. 31, No. 1, p. 43, 

July, 1936). 
Silverthorne, N., Fraser. D. T. and Brown. A. — Active Immunization of Whooping 

Cough. (Bulletin Trimestriel, Vol. IV. No. 13, 1937, Geneva). 
Silverthorne, N., Fraser, D. T. and Snelling, C. E. — Influenzal Meningitis^ (Jour. 

of Ped., Vol. 10, No. 2, p. 228, February, 1937 ) . 
Snelling, C. E. — A Study of the Birch-Hirschfeld Photometric Test for Vitamin A 

Deficiency. (Jour. Ped., Vol. 9, p. 655, November, 1936) . 
Snelling. C. E. and Brown A. — Tetany in the Newborn. (Jour, of Ped.. Vol. 10, 

No. 2, p. 167. February. 1937 ) . 
Summerfeldt, Miss P. — Some Problems of Heart Disease in Children. (Can. Med. 

Assoc. Jour.. Vol. 35, p. 165, 1936). 
Summerfeldt. Miss P.- and Brown. A. — Morquio's Disease. Report of Tivo Cases. 

(Archives of Dis. in Child., Vol. 11, p. 221, August. 1936). 
Tisdall, F. F. — Deficiency Diseases, their Prevention and Treatment. (Bulletin Trime- 
striel, Vol. IV, No. 13, 1937, Geneva ) . 
The Effect of Nutrition on the Primary Teeth. (Child Development, Vol. 8, 

p. 102, 1937). 
Weld. C. B. — A Capillary Resistance Test and its Relation to Vitamins C and D. 

(Jour. Ped., Vol. 9, p 226, August, 1936). 

Department of Pathology and Bacteriology 

Bracken, M. M. — Hypernephroma and Spindle-Cell Sarcoma of the Kidney. (Amer. 

Jour. Cancer., Vol. 28, pp. 13-19. 1936). 
Duff, G. L. — The Nature of Experimental Cholesterol Arteriosclerosis in the Rabbit. 

(Arch. Path.. Vol. 22, pp. 161-182, 19.36). 
Holman. W. L.~Oskar Klotz, 1878-1936. (Arch. Path., Vol. 22, pp. 840-145, 1936). 
In Memoriam, Oskar Klotz. 1878-1936. (Jour. Path. & Bact., Vol. 44, pp. 

504-507, 1937). 
A Medical Study of Famous People. (Proceedings of Royal Can. Inst., Series 

III, Vol. 1, pp'. 47-49, 19.36 ) . 
Josephson. J. E. — Complement and the Complement Titer of the Blood in Lobar 

Pneumonia and Bronchopneumonia. (For the degree of B.Sc. (Med.).) 
Kerwin. A. J. — Idiopathic Amyloid Disease of the Heart. (Jour. Lab. & Clin. Med.. 

Vol. 22, pp. 255-262, 1936). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 89 

-MacDonald, A. E. — Choroidal Chorionepithelioma Secondary to Teratoma of the 

testicle. (Trans. Amer. Ophthal. Soc, 72nd Annual Meeting, Hot Springs, 

Va., 1936 1 . 
Moore. D. F. — A Statistical Study of Infective Endocarditis. (For the degree of 

B.Sc. (Med.).) 
Paterson, J. C. — Vascularization and Haemorrhage of the Intima of Arteriosclerotic 

Coronary Arteries. (Arch. Path.. Vol. 22. pp. 313-324, 1936 I. 
Rae. Miss M. V. — Epizootic Streptococcic Myocarditis in Guinea Pigs. (Jour. Inf. 

dis.. Vol. 59, pp. 236-243. 1936 1 . 
Robertson. Mrs. E. C. — Recent Work on the Tissue Changes in Vitamin A Deficiency. 

(Amer. Jour. Med. Sci., Vol. 192, pp. 409-436, 1936). 
Lou- Mineral Diets and Intestinal Stasis. ( For the degree of Ph.D. ) . 
Robinson. W. L. — An Improved System of Filing Surgical Reports and the Slides. 

(Jour. Lab. & Clin. Vied., Vol. 21, pp. 1308-1309, 1936). 
Autopsies in a Medico-Legal Way. (University of Toronto Medical Journal, 

Vol. 14. p. 229. 1937 ) . ' 

Ross, Vliss M. — Cannibalism in Bacteria. (For the degree of B.Sc. (Med.).) 

Department of Physiology 

Best, C. H. — Protamine insulin. (Nova Scotia Med. Bull., Vol. 15, p. 547, 1936). 
The teaching of physiology to medical students. ( Universitv of Toronto VIedical 

Journal, Vol. 14. p. 223, 1937 ) . 
Best. C. H. and Taylor, N. h.—The physiological basis of medical practice. A 

I niversily of Toronto text in applied physiology. (Baltimore. Williams 

and Wilkins,' 1936). 
Campbell. W. R., Fletcher, A. A. and Kerr. R. B. — Protamine insulin in the treatment 

of diabetes mellitus. (Amer. J. Vied. Sc, Vol. 192, p. 589, 1936). 
Caulfeild, A. H. W., Brown, M. H. and Waters, E. T. — Suitability of the monkey 

{Macacus rhesus) as a recipient for the Prausnitz-Kiistner reaction. ( Proc. 

Soc. Exper. Biol, and Med., Vol. 35, p. 109, 1936). 
Fletcher, Miss J. P. and Waters, E. T. — The influence of fructose on the glucose 

tolerance curve of normal and depancreatized animals. (J. Biol. Chem.. 
. (Proc. ) , Vol. XXXIII, p. 119, 1937 ) . 
Hill, A. V. and Solandt, D. Y. — The effect of ionized calcium on the time-constant 

of accommodation in nerves. (Canadian Medical Association Journal. Vol. 

36, p. 82, 1937). 
Murray, D. W. C. Jaques. L. B. Perrett. T. S. and Best, C. H. — Heparin and vascular 

occlusion. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol. 35, p. 621, 1936). 
Mustard, R. A. and Jaques, L. B. — The action of heparin in the clotting system. 

(Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. 31, Section V, 1937). 
Smith, C. G. and Solandt, D. Y. — The relation of contracture to the increment in 

the resting heat production of muscle under the influence of potassium^ 

(Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. 31, Section V, 1937). 
Solandt. D. Y. — Facilities for post-graduate training in the British Isles. (University 

of Toronto Medical Journal, Vol. 14, p. 185, 1937 ) . 
The role of calcium in the excitation of nerve. (Am. J. Physiol.. (Proc), 

Vol. 119, p. 406, 1937). 
Solandt, D. Y. and Smith, C. G. — Measurement of the time factors of excitation of 

muscle. (Proc. Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., 1937). 
Weld, C. B. and Woodward, H. E. — Note on blood volume determinations. (Jour. 

Lab. and Clin. Med., Vol. 22, p. 410, 1937). 

Wilson, M. J. — The function of the pyloric sphincter. (Can. .Med. Assoc. Jour., 
Vol. 36. p. 15. 1937). ' 



90 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Department of Medical Research 

Banting, F. G. — The Internal Secretion of the Pancreas. Address given in connection 

with the opening, of addition to Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, May, 1937. 
(Science, June, 1937). 
Banting, F. G. and Hall, G. E. — The Experimental Production of Myocardial and 

Coronary Artery Lesions. (Association of American Physicians, May, 1937). 
Bonneycastle, D. D. — An Experimental Study of the Toxemia Produced by Cutaneous 

Burns. (Royal Society of Canada, May, 1937). 
Coles, B. C. Richardson, H. F. and Hall, G. E. — Experimental Gas Embolism. 

II. Factors Other than Air as a Cause of Death in Some Cases Diagnosed 

''Air Embolism." (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., July, 1937). 
Coles, B. C. — Douche Solutions as a Factor in Fatal Intravenous Air Embolism in 

Criminal Abortions. (Royal Sociey of Canada, May, 1937). 
Creech, H. J. and Franks. W. R. — Chemoantigens and Tumour. (Can. Chem. and 

Met., February, 1937). 
Compounds Synthesized from Proteins and Carcinogenic Hydrocarbons. (Am. 

J. Cancer, July, 1937). 
Ettinger, G. H., Hall, G. E. and Banting F. G. — Effect of Repeated and Prolonged 

Stimulation of the Vagus Nerve in the Dog. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol 

35. pp. 27-31,' 1936). 
Ettinger, G. H. and Hall. G. E. — The Effect of Repeated Injections of Choline and B. 

Pyocaneus in the Dog. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 35, p. 83, 1936). 
Ettinger, G. H., Hall, G. E. and Lang, Miss J. — The Effect of Repeated Injections of 

Histamine in the Dog. A. On the Heart and Blood-Vessels . (Can. Med. 

Assoc. Jour., Vol. 35, pp. 184-186, 1936). 
Fallon, J. T. — Specific Tissue Reaction to Phospholipids: A Suggested Explanation 

for the Similarity of the Lesions of Silicosis and Pulmonary Tuberculosis. 

(Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 36, pp. 223-228, 1937). 
Franks, W. R. and Shaw, M. — Irradiation and Tumour Metabolism. (Can. Chem. 

and Met., February, 1937). 
Franks, W. R. and Creech, H. J. — Chemoantigens from Carcinogenic Substances. 

(Royal Society of Canada, May, 1937). 
Fanks, W. R., Proctor, L. D. and Duncan. A. — The Measurement of the Dust Hazard. 

(Royal Society of Canada, May, 1937). 
Gray, W. M. — X-ray Diffraction Dust Analysis. (Royal Society of Canada, May, 

1937). 
Gray, L. M. — Experimental Fat Embolism. (Royal Society of Canada, May, 1937). 
Hali, G. E. and Lucas, C. C. — Choline-esterase Activity of Normal and Pathological 

Human Sera. (J. Pharm. and Exp. Therap., Vol. 59, No. 1, January, 1937). 
Hall, G. E. and Ettinger, G. H. — Effect of Regular Injection of Acetylcholine upon 

the Choline-esterase Activity of Serum. (J. Pharm. and Exp. Therap., Vol. 

59. No. 1, January, 1937)'. 
Irwin, D. — The Tissue Response Produced by Various Types of Quartz. (Royal 

Society of Canada, May, 1937). 
Denny, J. J., Robson, W. D. and Irwin, D. A. — The Prevention of Silicosis by Metallic 

Aluminum. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., July, 1937). 
Lang, J. and Ettinger. G. H. — The Effect of Repeated Injections of Histamine in the 

Dog. B. On the Blood. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 35, pp. 186-187, 

1936). 
Lucas, C. C. and Hall. G. E. — Acetylcholine-choline Esterase System. III. Esterase 

Activity of Sera of Different Species of Animals. (J. Pharm. and Exp. 

Therap., 1937). 
Manning, G. W. and Hall, G. E. — -A Continuous Intravenous Injection Apparatus 

for Unrestrained Animals. (J. Lab. and Clin. Med., 1937). 
An Apparatus for Prolonged Stimulation Experiments in Unanaesthetized Ani- 
mals. (J. Lab. and Clin. Med., 1937). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 91 

Mendel, B. — The Action of Ferricyanide on Tumour Cells. (American Assoc, for 

Cancer Research. Chicago, March. 1937 ) . 
Richardson, H. F. — Intravenous Air Embolism. (Royal Society of Canada May 

1937). ■ ■ ' 

Richardson, H. F., Coles, B. C. and Hall. G. E. — Experimental Gas Embolism. J. 

Intravenous Air Embolism. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 36. pp. 584-588 

1937). 

Department of Surgery 

Couch, J. H. — Reconstruction of the Common Bile Duct. (British Journal of Surgery 

Vol. XXIV. No. 93. pp. 130-136, 1936). 
Varicose Veins and Blood Stasis. (University of Toronto Medical Journal. Vol. 

14, No. 1, p. 10, November, 1936). 
Varicose Veins and Lymph Stasis. (Universitv of Toronto Medical Journal. Vol. 

14. No. 2, p. 43^ December, 1936). 
Foulds, G. S. — Prolonged Drainage of the Ureter. (Transactions of the American 

Association of Genito Urinary Surgeons, pp. 1-5. 1936). 
Graham, R. R. — The Surgeon's Responsibility in the Treatment of Duodenal Ulcer. 

(Canadian Medical Association Journal, September, 19361. 
The Treatment of Perforated Duodenal Ulcers. (Surgery, Gynaecology and 

Obstetrics. February 1st. 1937). 
Diverticultitis of the Sigmoid Colon. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, 

February, 1937). 
Janes. R. M. — Present-day Methods of Treatment of Carcinoma of the Breast: Indi- 
cations for the Use of Each Method. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, 

Vol. 35! No. 5. pp. 531-535, November, 1936). 
Harris, R. I. — Difficulty in the Diagnosis of Bone Tumours. (The Journal of Bone 

and Joint Surgery, Vol. XVIII, No. 3, pp. 631-640, July 1936). 
McKenzie, K. G. — Glioblastoma — A Point of View Concerning Treatment. (Archives 

of Neurology and Psychiatry, September, 1936 ) . 
Wookey, H. — Surgical Aspects of Oral Cancer. (Canadian Medical Association 

Journal, February, 1937 ) . 

School of Hygiene and Connaught Laboratories 
Allin. A. E. — Development of skin sensitivity to diphtheria toxoid. (Trans. Roy 

Soc. Can., Vol. 31, Section V. 1937). 
Anglin, G. C. and Brown, M. H. — Anti-pneumococcus serum in pneumonia. (Canadian 

Med. Assoc. Journal. Vol. 36, pp. 370-375. 1937). 
Best, C. H.. Charles, A. and Cowan, C. R.— r/ie administration of heparin. (Am. 

J. Physiol., Vol. 119, p. 272, 1937). 
Best. C. H., Cowan. C. and MacLean, D. L. — Heparin and the formation of white 

thrombi. (Science. Vol. 85, pp. 338-339, 1937). 
Best. C. H. and Ridout. J. H. — Dietary Casein and cholesteryl esters in liver. (J. 

Physiol., Vol. 87, p. 14, 1936). 
Brown, M. H. — The specificity of typhoid and paratyphoid vaccines in animals. 

(Canadian Public Health Journal, Vol. 28, p.'36, 1937). 
Brown, M. H. and Anderson, E. A.- — B. alkalescens {Andrews) — its relation to mem- 
bers of the typhoid-dysentery group. (Can. Public Health Journal, Vol. 27. 

pp. 560-562; 1936). 
Campbell, J. and Best, C. H. — Further observations on the effects of anterior pituitary 

extracts on liver fat. ( Proc. Can. Physiol. Soc; Canadian Med. Asso. Jour., 

Vol. 36, p. 81. 1937). 
Caulfeild, A. H. W., Brown, M. H. and Waters, E. T.—Alum as an adjuvant in sens- 
itizing guinea pigs to ragweed pollen {Ambrosia artemisii folia ) . ( J. Allergy, 

Vol. 7, pp. 451-454. 1936). 
Concerning the identity of the antibody in experimental anaphylaxis and that 

occurring in man naturally or spontaneously sensitized. (J. Lab. & Clin. 

Med., Vol. 22, pp. 657-664, 1937). 



92 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Suitability of the monkey {Macacus rhesus) as a recipient for the Prausnitz 

Kustner reaction. (Proc. Soc. Exper. Biol. & Med., Vol. 35, pp. 109-112, 

1936 1 . 
Charles, A. F. and Scott, D. A. — Studies on heparin. IV. Observations on the 

chemistry of heparin. ( Biochem. J., Vol. 30, pp. 1927-1933, 1936). 
Cleghorn, R. A., McHenry, E. W. and McVicar, G. A. — The adrenal cortical extract 

requirement of the cat. (Proc. Can. Physiol. Soc; Can. Med. Assoc. 

Jour., Vol. 36,' p. 83, 1937). 
Craigie. J. and Brandon, K. F. — Bacteriophage specific for the 0-resistant V form 

of B. typhosus. (J. Path. Bact., Vol. 43, pp. 233-248, 1936). 
The identification of the V and W forms of B. typhosus and the occurrence of 

the V form in cases of typhoid fever and in carriers. (J. Path. Bact.. Vol. 

43, pp. 249-260. 1936). 
Craigie. J. and Wishart, F. 0. — The complement fixation reaction in variola. (Can. 

Public Health Journal, Vol. 27, pp. 371-379, 1936). 
Studies on the soluble precipitable substances of vaccinia. I. The dissociation 

in vitro of soluble precipitable substances from elementary bodies of vac- 
cinia. (J. Exper. Med., Vol. 64, pp. 803-818, 1936). 
//. The soluble precipitable substances of sermal vaccine. (J. Exper. Med., 

Vol. 64, pp. 819-830, 1936). 
///. The precipitin responses of rabbits to the LS antigen of vaccinia. (J. Exper. 

Med., Vol. 64, pp. 831-841, 1936). 
Craisie. J. and Yen, C. H. — V bacteriophages for B. typhosus. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can., 

Vol. 31, Section V, 1937 ) . 
Defries. R. D. — Observations on the training of public health personnel. (Canadian 

Public Health Journal, Vol. 28, pp. 67-74, 1937 I . 
Dolman. C. E. — Serum therapy. (Canadian Medical Association Journal, Vol. 35, 

pp. 628-635. 1936). 
A small outbreak of staphylococcal food poisoning in Vancouver. (Can. Pub. 

Health Jour.. Vol. 27, pp. 494-496, 1936). 
Dolman. C. E. and Kitching, J. S. — Staphylococcus toxin, toxoid and antitoxin. 

(Can. Pub. Health Jour., Vol. 27, pp. 529-535, 1936). 
Dolman, C. E., Wilson, R. J. and Cockcroft, W. H. — A new method of detecting 

staphylococcus enterotoxin. (Can. Pub. Health Jour., Vol. 27. pp. 489-493, 

1936). 
Fisher, A. M. and Scott, D. A. — The effect of various substances on the action of 

insulin (J. Pharm. Exper. Therap., Vol. 58, pp. 78-92, 1936). 
The prolongation of insulin action. (J. Biol. Chem., Vol. XXXHI, p. 119, 

1937). 
FitzGerald. J. G. — The six year medical course in the University of Toronto. (J. Ass. 

Am. Med. Coll., Vol. 11, pp. 209-212, 1936). 
Lndergraduate instruction in hygiene and preventive medicine. (J. Ass. Am. 

Med. Coll., Vol. 11, pp. 240-246, 1936). 
Foley, A. M., Faille, J. L. and Brandon, K. F. — A hospital epidemic of paratyphoid 

A. (Can. Pub. Health Jour.. Vol. 27, pp. 313-323, 19.36). 
Frazer, D. T. and Allin, A. E. — Experimental diphtheria in monkeys. (Can. Pub 

Health Jour.. Vol. 28, p. 44, 1937). 
Value of cortin in preventing diphtheria intoxication. (Can. Pub. Health Jour., 

Vol. 28, p. 44, 1937). 
Eraser. D. T. and Halpern, K. C. — A comparison of the diphtheria antitoxin content 

of maternal and cord sera. (Trans. Roy. Soc. Can.. Vol. 31, Section V, 

1937). 
The antitoxin level in children after toxoid. (Can. Pub. Health Jour., Vol. 28. 

p. 41, 1937). 
Eraser, D. T.. MacNabb, A. L. and Roy, I. S. — The intracutaneous virulence test for 

Corynebacterium diphtheriae. (Am. J. Pub. Health Year Book Supp., 

Vol. 27, pp. 121-124, 1937). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 93 

Fraser. F. H. — Prevention and treatment of scarlet fever. I Can. Pub. Health Jour., 

Vol. 28, pp. 53-62, 1937 ) . 
Immunity against haemolytic streptococci in the rabbit. I Can. Pub. Health 

Jour.. Vol. 28, p. 44, 1937). 
Gibbons, R. J. — Bacillary dysentery in British Columbia. (Can. Pub. Health Jour.. 

Vol. 27, pp. 606-608, 1936). 
An epidemic of bacillary dysentery. (Can. Pub. Health Jour., Vol. 28, pp. 

278-281, 1937). 
Hare, R. — Recent advances in the study of influenza. (Can. Pub. Health Jour.. Vol. 

28. pp. 157-165, 1937). 
Heard. R. H. D. and Weinstein, S. S. — Use of the dietary anoestrou^ rate as a test 

object for the oestrus-inducing gonadotropic hormone of pregnancy urine. 

(Proc. Can. Physiol. Soc; Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 36, p. 82, 1937). 
Kav. K. K. and Barrett. H. M. — A new method for the determination of the transmis- 
sion factor of a spectroradiometer. (J. Optic. Soc. America, Vol. 27, pp. 

65-68, 1937). 
Kitching, J. S. and Farrell, L. N. — Staphylococcal immunity. (Am. J. Hyg., Vol. 24, 

pp. 268-2&4, 1936 ) . 
McHenrv. E. W. — Liver therapy in the treatment of pernicious anaemia ( Can. 
■ Pub. Health Jour., Vol 27, pp. 421-426, 1936). 
An economic viewpoint of nutrition. (Can. Chem. Met., Vol. 21. February, 1937) . 
Vitamin B' and fatty livers. (J. Physiol., Vol. 89, pp. 287-295, 1937)'. 
An interrelation between vitamin B^. choline and fat in influencing weight 

changes in young rats. (Proc. Can. Physiol. Soc.; Can. Med. Assoc. Jour.. 

Vol. 36, p. 82, 1937). 
Mcintosh, J. W., Carder, E. D. and Dolman, C. E. — A recent outbreak of hemorrhagic 

smallpox in British Columbia. (Can. Pub. Health Journal. Vol. 27, pp. 

367-370, 1936). 
McKinnon, N. E. — The extent of the public health problem of tuberculosis in Ontario. 

(Can. Pub. Health Jour., Vol. 28, pp. 209-211, 1937). 
Moloney. P. J. — A test for the reactivity of diphtheria toxoid. (Trans. Roy. Soc. 

Can., Vol. 31, Section V, 1937)'. 
Moloney, P. J. and Orr. M. D. — The effect of certain chemical treatments on the 

antigenicity and specific reactivity of purified diphtheria toxoid. (Trans 

Roy. Soc. Can., Vol. 31. Section V, 1937).' 
Murray, D. W. C, Jaques, L. B. Perrett, T. S. and Best, C. H. — Heparin and vascular 

occlusion. (Can. Med. Assoc. Jour., Vol. 35, pp. 621-622, 1936). 
Plummer. H. — The streprococcal antitoxin content of human sera. (Can. Pub. 

Health Jour., Vol. 28, p. 40, 1937 1 . 
Rake. G. — The mouse protection test in the standardization of antimeningococcic 

serum. (Can. Pub. Health Jour., Vol. 28, pp. 265-269', 1937). 
Reedman. E. J. and McHenry, E. W. — The state of ascorbic acid in plant tissues. 

(Can. Chem. Met., Vol. 21. p. 80. 1937; j. Nutrit.. Vol. 13, p. 14. Supp., 

1937 ) . 
Ross, M. A. — Endemic index for scarlet fever, diphtheria, whooping cough and 

measles in the provinces of Canada. July, 1935-June, 1936. (Can. Pub. 

Health Jour., Vol. 26, pp. 471-473. 1936). 
Scott. D. A. — The assay of the international crystalline insulin by the mouse method. 

(Quart. Bull.' Health Org. L. o N. 5, pp. 607-609. 1936). 
Scott. D. A. and Fisher, A. M. — Studies on insulin with protamine. (J. Pharm. 

Exper. Therap., Vol. 5S, pp. 78-92, 1936). 
Sellers, A. H. — A study of foetal mortality in Ontario. (Can. Pub. Health Jour.. 

Vol. 28, pp. 22-31,1937). 
The classification of the causes of foetal death. (Can. Pub. Health Jour.. Vol. 

28, pp. 282-290, 1937 ) . 
A study of the objective efficacy of liver therapy in pernicious anaemia based 

on recorded mortality data. (Am. J. Hyg.. Vol. 25. pp. 259-268. 1937). 



94 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Siebenmann. C. — Influence of aeration and diffusion on toxin formation by C. 
diphtheriae. (J. Path. Bact.. Vol. 43, pp. 261-266, 1936). 
Refractonietric and chemical study of diphtheria toxin. (J. Immunol., Vol. 31, 

pp. 257-268, 1936). 
Refractometric methods for determining total protein. (Biochem. J., Vol. 31, 

pp. 205-211, 1937). 
Bacterial growth in broth media in presence of silverfoil. (Can. Pub. Health 
Jour., Vol. 28. p. 43, 1937). 
Silverthorne, N. — The presence of the meningococcus in the nasopharynx of normal 
individuals and the bactericidal property of blood against the meningococcus. 
(J. Pediat.. Vol. 9, pp. 328-330, 1936). 
The continuous intravenous method of serum administration. (J. Pediat.. Vol. 

9, pp. 755-757, 1936). 
Active immunization of whooping cough. (Quart. Bull. Internal. Ass. Prev. 
Pediat., Vol. 4, 1937). 
Silverthorne, iV. and Eraser, D. T. — Comparison of the bactericidal action of human 
and guinea pig blood on strains of the meningococccus with the mouse mucin 
test for virulence. (J. Immunol., Vol. 31, pp. 43-50, 1936). 
Silverthorne. N.. Eraser. D. T. and Snelling, C. ^.—Influenzal meningitis. (J. 

Pediat., Vol. 10, pp. 228-232, 1937 ) . 
Sneath, P. A. T., Kerslake, E. G. and Scruby, E. — Tetanus immunity : The resistance 
guinea pigs to lethal spore doses induced by active and passive immuni- 
zation. (Am. J. Hyg., Vol. 25. pp. 464-476. 1937). 

EACULTY OE APPLIED SCIENCE 

Department of Chemical Engineering 

Jansen, G. V. and Smith, E. A. — The Effect of Regain on the Rate of Adsorption of 
Stannic Chloride by Silk Fibroin. ( Canadian Journal of Research. BIS, 
pp. 53-64, 1937). 

Department of Civil Engineering 

Loudon, T. R. — Final observations on the performance of the single seat plane known 
as "The Pou". (Canadian Aviation. October. 1936; The Aeroplane). 

Young, C. R. — Some Misconceptions in Engineering Economics. (The Canadian 
Engineer. March 30th, 1937). 
Fifty Years of Bridge Building in Canada. (The Engineering Journal. June, 
1937). 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 

Allcut, E. A. — The Heat Insulation of Buildings. { Engineering Journal. January, 
1937). 

Allcut, E. A. and Ewens, E. G. — Heat Insulation Tests and Their Applications. (Heat- 
ing, Piping and Air Conditioning, May, 1937 j. 
Heat Insulation as Applied to Buildings and Structures. (Bulletin No. 149, 
School of Engineering Research). 

Angus, R. W. — Water Hammer in Pipes, Including those Supplied by Centrifugal 
Pumps; Graphical Treatment. (Proceedings Institution of Mechanical En- 
gineers, London, England, 1937). 
False Pressure Readings in Waterworks Pumps. ( Journal American Water 

Works Association, April, 1937). 
Friction Losses for Gases and Liquids Passing through Pipes. (Canadian 
Engineer, September 1st, 1936). 

Angus, R. W. and Bryce, J. B. — Model Tests on Spillways in the Power Dam at 
Abitibi Canyon. (Bulletin 150, School of Engineering Research, Univers- 
ity of Toronto). 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 95 



Department of Metallurgical Engineering 

Montgomery, R. J. and Elliott, A. C. — A New Type of Thermal Shock Test. (Journal 
Canadian Ceramic Society, Vol. 6, 1937 ) . 

FACULTY OF FORESTRY 

Howe, C. D. — Forest Management in Ontario. (The Engineering Journal, Vol. XX, 

No. 2, February, 1937). 
Dwi'^ht T. W. — Refinements in Plotting and Harmonizing Freehand Curves. (Forestry 

Chronicle, Vol. XIII, No. 2, June, 1937). 

FACULTY OF DENTISTRY 

Lott, F. M. — The Use of Glass as a Denture Base. (Journal of the American Dental 

Association, Vol. XXIII, p. 1356, July, 1936). (Journal Ontario Dental 

Association, Vol. XI, p. 44, July, 1936). 
Glass as a Denture Base, i Bulletin No. 23, Canadian Dental Research Founda- 
tion, p. 62, July, 1936). 
Colored Glass as a Full Denture Base. (Oral Health, Vol. XXVI, pp. 304-305, 

July, 1936). 
Glass as a Denture Base: A Synopsis of Bulletin No. 23 of the Canadian Dental 

Research Foundation. (Journal of the Canadian Dental Association, Vol. 

II, No. 9, pp. 386-388, September, 1936 ) . 
The Story of the Development of a Technique for the Use of Glass as a Denture 

Base. (Oral Health, Vol. XXVI, No. 9, pp. 397400, September, 1936). 
Advantages and Disadvantages of the Use of Glass as a Denture Base. ( Journal 

of the American Dental Association, Vol. XXIII, pp. 1915-1919, October, 

1936). 
The Composition, Properties and Inhruclions for the Use of an Expanding- 

Investment Material for Dental Casting. (Oral Health, Vol. XXVII, pp. 

201-208, May, 1937). 

ONTARIO COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

The staff of the Ontario College of Elucation — "The School": a magazine devoted 
to elementary and secondary education; two editions, ^' Elementary^' and 
"Secondary" : monthly except July and August; Vol. XXV, September 1936 
to June 1937, pp. 1000 in each edition. (Toronto, the University of Tor- 
onto Press, 1936-71. 
Althouse, J. G. — Canada. Educational Yearbook of the International Institute of 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1936 (Bureau of Publications, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, pp. 121-14i8). 

Professional Ethics for Teachers. (The Educational Review, St. John, N.B., 
October, 1936). 

Trends in Education. (The Special Teacher, Toronto, September, 1936). 

The Principal Takes a Hand in Teacher Training. (School Progress, Toronto, 
January, 1937 ) . 
Cameron, M. A. — The Financing of Education in Ontario. ( Bulletin No. 7, Depart- 
ment of Educational Research ) . 

The Cost of Education. (The School, Vol. XXV, No. 1, September. 1936). 

The Distribution of the Burden of Supporting Education. (The School, Vol. 
XXV, No. 6, February, 1937). Reprinted in The Educational Digest, 
Vol. II, No. 9, May, 1937 ) . 

LIBRARY SCHOOL 
Wallace, W. S. — The Encyclopedia of Canada. Volumes IV and V. 



96 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

DEPARTMENT OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION AND PUBLICITY 

Dunlop. W. J. — Personality. (The Canadian Credit Institute, March, 1937). 
Adult Education in Canada. (Ontario Library Review, May, 1937). 
Adult Education in Canada. (New Brunswick Annual Report on Education, 1936). 
The Board of Governors. (Lniversity of Toronto Monthly, March, 1937). 
The Occupational Therapist. (Proceedings, American Association of Occupa- 
tional Therapy, New York ) . 

ST. GEORGE'S SCHOOL FOR CHILD STUDY 

Bernhardt. K. S.. Millichamp. D. A., Charles. M. W. and McFarland, M. ?.—An 
Analysis of the Social Belmviour of Preschool Children with the Aid of 
Motion Pictures. (University of Toronto Press, 1937). 

Blatz, W. E., Chant. S. N. F. and Salter, M. D.— Emotional Episodes in the Child of 
School Age. (University of Toronto Press. 1937). 

Bott. H. — Adult Attitudes to Children's Misdemeanours. (University of Toronto 
Press. 1937). 
Hon Children Learn. (Parents Magazine, March, 1937). 

(15) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF UNIVERSITY EXTENSION 

AND PUBLICITY 

(r. /. Dunlop. Esq., B.A.. B.Paed.) 

Ihiring the session 1936-37 more attention has been given than in previous 
years to visiting collegiate institutes and high schools, addressing students and en- 
deavouring to give them personal advice in the choice of courses. Principals welcome 
these visits in the most cordial manner and from the pupils themselves there is a 
remarkable response. The young people in the secondary schools have very little 
knowledge of the courses offered by the University and they do not know how to 
obtain the necessary information. Many of them seem to regard the University with 
a certain amount of awe and dread until they actually meet and hear a member of the 
staff. Then they are more than willing to ask questions and to say what courses thev 
would like to follow. Among these young people there are some able students, 
occasionally brilliant students, who have no thought of attending the University 
because they are perfectly sure that their parents cannot afford the cost of a university 
course. These young men and women have never heard of scholarships, bursaries 
or loan funds which might solve the problem for them, at least partially. Very few 
of them have heard of the newer courses established in recent years by the University. 
To perform the service that is required means a full half-day in each collegiate 
institute or high school — and there are 69 collegiate institutes and 156 high schools 
in Ontario! But this seems to be a most fertile field and one which the Lniversity 
should cultivate intensively. Not only is an important and necessary service rendered 
the young men and women, but public opinion favourable to the Lniversity is 
gradually built up. It is difficult to say whether this form of service can be included 
under "Extension" or "Publicity''. But it really should receive a great deal of 
attention, not only in the interests of the Lniversity but in the interests of the future 
citizens of this Province. 

The administration of the pass course for teachers is one of the most important 
functions of the Department of University Extension. In that respect, this depart- 
ment has now become a reasonably large Arts College. 653 teachers and others who 
are employed during the day attend Teachers' Classes throughout the winter and most 
of these wrote their examinations in May with reasonably good results. 542 teachers 
attended the Summer Session and made some progress toward the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. In the course for prospective specialists there are 37 teachers and in the 
course leading to the degree in pedagogy there were 126 teachers. This service for 
teachers increases in size and importance each year. Most teachers are attracted 
to a course which demands a high standard and they seek a degree which has prestige. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 97 

It should not be necessary to say ( but perhaps it should be said ) that teachers never 
ask that the standards be lowered for them; they ask only that the necessary instruc- 
tion be made accessible in order that they may take advantage of it without the 
necessity for giving up, even temporarily, their means of livelihood. There is no 
more substantial work being done in adult education than the provision of courses 
for teachers. As the years go on, graduates of our pass course for teachers are 
obtaining some of the highest posts in the educational field. 

The Committee on Lniversity Extension would like to restrict the first year class 
in occupational therapy to an enrolment of twenty and the first vear class in phvsio- 
therapy to fifteen. This may be difficult but it seems necessary if the available accom- 
modation is not to be overtaxed. This session there have been 4.5 students in the two 
years of occupational therapy and 11 in the two years of physiotherapy. The demand 
for trained therapists of both types has been well maintained and seems recently 
to be increasing. The young women who graduate in these courses are well qualified 
to render an important public service and they are also equipped to earn a reasonably 
good living. 

From time to time one hears that the single extension lecture is not of any value 
because there cannot be any continuity in the instruction imparted and that any 
benefit derived from such a lecture is purely ephemeral. Those who listen to exten- 
sion lectures, even to only one lecture, would not agree with that dictum. Nor would 
those members of the staff who deliver the lectures. It may be that extension lectures 
involve for the lecturers some inconvenience and some loss of time from their other 
duties. But most members of the university staff respond without any demonstration 
of reluctance to invitations received from organisations in distant localities because 
they feel that citizens of the Province are entitled to this service (after all. they own 
the Lniversity I and because the professors themselves frequently get a fresh view- 
point, the viewpoint of those outside the University, when they mingle with men and 
women in other walks of life. On the other side of the picture are those who listen 
to extension lectures. If one may accept as evidence the letters received from 
secretaries of societies to which lectures have been given, the verdict would be that 
extension lectures are both profitable and enjoyable. The total number of Exten- 
sion Lectures was 199. which were distributed as follows: Barrie. 3; Bowmanville, 2; 
Brampton. 10; Brantford. 1; Cleveland. 1; Coboconk, 1; Cobourg. 6; Flora. 2; 
Fergus. 1: Flesherton, 1: Guelph, 3; Hamilton, 7; Hanover, 2; Harriston. 1; Lindsay 
2; London. 1: Millbrook. 1; Morrisburg, 1; Napanee, 2; Niagara Falls, 9; North 
Bay. 2; Orangeville, 1; Ottawa, 4; Parrv Sound. 1: Peterborough. 10; Port Hope, 1; 
St. Catharines, 4; Sarnia, 5; Sault Ste. Marie, 6: Simcoe, 2; Stratford. 2; Toronto. 
89; Walkerton, 2; Weston. 6; Whitby, 1; Windsor, .5; Woodstock, 1. 

The members of the staff who gave the Extension Lectures this year are as 
follows: W. J. Dunlop. 69: Professor N. A. M. MacKenzie. 2.5; Dr. V. Lange, 13; 
Eh-. C. R. Myers. 12: Dr. K. H. Rogers. 12; Professor E. A. Havelock, 10; Mrs. John 
Creighton. 8; Dr. F. L. Barber, 5; Dr. F. S. Hogg, 5; Dr. E. J. Pratt, 4; J. Campbell 
Mclnnes. 3; Professor E. R. Arthur, 2; Dr. W. E. Blatz, 2; Dr. A. Brady, 2; Professor 
G. W. Brown. 2; Professor J. Cano. 3; Professor E. A. Dale, 2; Professor J. A. Long, 
2; Professor E. W. Mclnnis. 2; Dr. J. 0. Wilhelm. 2; Professor E. J. G. Alford, 1; 
Dean J. G. Althouse. 1; Professor F. C. Auld. 1; Dr. K. S. Bernhardt, 1; Mrs. H. 
Bott, 1 ; Professor W . M. Drummond, 1 ; Mrs. H. Johnson, 1 ; Professor Wilson 
Knight. 1; Professor T. J. Meek. 1; Mr. T. Mustard, 1; Miss Harriet Parsons, 1; 
Dr. F. A. Smith. 1: Bishop W. C. White. 1; Mr. H. D. Wood, 1. 

Evening Tutorial Classes continued to flourish and to increase in popularity. 
3725 adults attended these classes during the session. The subjects in which classes 
were conducted were as follows: Accounting, advertising, art of vocal expression, 
astronomy, chemistry, contemporary history, cost accounting, economics, English 
composition and essay-writing, English diction and speech. English literature, 
French. German, gymnastics, dancing and swimming, history of the English language, 
house furnishings and decorations, heating, ventilation and refrigeration, internal 
combustion engines, industrial and business organisation, interior decorating, invest- 



98 REPORT O F THE No. 12 

ments. Italian, journalism, mercantile law, metallurgy', modern international relations, 
music, newspaper writing, parent education, psychology, public speaking, purchasing, 
secretarial practice. Spanish, speech-reading, traffic and transportation, co-operation 
and mining matters. 

For these classes there are no academic admission requirements and no examin- 
tions are held: the instruction does not lead to any certificate, diploma or degree. 
Those who attend these classes are all adults and they are seeking knowledge simply 
for its own sake, without any thought of monetary return or of improved status. 
Instruction is offered only in subjects which come within the scope of the University's 
curriculum and there is no overlapping with other institutions. Nowhere else in 
Canada has this form of adult education been perfected as it is here but one university 
in \^ estern Canada began last year to offer evening classes of this type. 

The Workers' Educational Association has had a good year and interest in its 
classes has been well maintained. The subjects of instruction have been: Economics, 
physiology, political science, composition, history, psychology, international relations, 
philosophy, sociology, public speaking, literature and current events. The centres 
in which classes have been operated during the session are: Beaverton, Brantford, 
Fergus. Gait. Hamilton. Kingston. Kitchener, Innerkip, London, Oshawa, Peterbor- 
ough. Preston. St. Catharines, Stratford, Toronto, Windsor, and Woodstock. 953 
men and 626 women were enrolled in these classes, a total of 1579. 

As in former years, short refresher courses have been conducted in co-operation 
with the School of Nursing. There have been three of these courses and all have been 
well attended. The School of Nursing now wishes to carry on this activity under its 
own auspices without the assistance of this department and there seems to be no good 
reason why that should not be the procedure in the future. 

For the second time a week's course in Public Administration was arranged but 
the time was changed from February to April. This year there were two sections in 
the course, one for those who had attended before and the other for those who had 
come for the first time. There were 65 in attendance and the course was most 
successful. A rather general request was received for two sections next year, one 
rural and one urban. 

For some years correspondence courses have been operated for the Canadian 
Credit Institute, for the Chartered Life Underwriters Association, and, more recently, 
for the Certified Public Accountants' Association. These courses continue to be 
satisfactory in every respect and are apparently providing excellent facilities for 
young business men to improve their standing in their own occupation. The number 
enrolled in these courses this session have been respectively, 107, 126 and 54. 

The Inter-University Debates were organised and carried on this year as they 
have been in the past and Professor J. F. Macdonald's book reviews continued to be 
a feature of the programme of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 

Each normal school in Ontario was visited during the year and the facilities 
offered by the University to the teachers-in-training were outlined. 

University publicity has been rather more extensively carried on this year than 
in previous years. Almost every day there has been universitv news in the daily 
papers and the Canadian Press has assisted most effectively in supplying news items 
to daily papers throughout the Dominion. Articles have, as usual, been written for 
magazines, general periodicals, educational journals, and newspapers. 

Totals are sometimes interesting. The total number of students who took 
continuous courses throughout the session was 7,622. Of these 4,345 were men and 
3.277 were women. Naturally, this figure does not include all who took advantage 
of the facilities offered. For example, 33,597 attended Extension Lectures. For the 
past seventeen years, the number of adult students who work steadily in some definite 
course has gradually increased. Now the total is a rather substantial one. This 
session has been, in every respect, most successful. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 99 

(16) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL 

SCIENCE 

(Professor E. J. Urwick, Acting Director) 

The Department has now completed the twenty-first year of its existence as a 
teaching department of the University. Its growth and. we trust, its usefuhiess have 
increased steadily. In the earlier years the number of graduating students seldom 
exceeded twelve; last session 47 diplomas were awarded to graduates. A higher 
standard of study has also been made possible, partly by the regulation now in force 
which requires that all students (except those specially qualified by experience I shall 
be university graduates, and partly by the generosity of the Governors in establishing 
an internal staff of five teachers. The Department also obtains invaluable assistance 
from other departments within the University, notably those of philosophy, 
psychology, political science, sociology, and public health nursing. It has thus 
become possible to provide an increased amount of specialisation to meet the needs 
of particular students, and to offer certain options in the regular curriculum. 

At the same time, the extra-mural work of the students in the practical field has 
become rather more diversified, and opportunities are afforded to students to follow 
their special interests in such fields as mental health work, recreation and communitv 
organisation, in addition to the longer established activities connected with relief 
of distress, the care of children, the prevention of ill-health and delinquencv. and 
the many other forms of organised social service, both public and voluntarv. The 
Department is under an ever-increasing obligation to the responsible directors of all 
the important agencies in the city of Toronto and the Province of Ontario, and to the 
civic and provincial departments of Welfare, Health and Labour, for the assistance 
so readily given in the practical teaching of our students. 

The normal course of two years' study is still adhered to for the majority of the 
students; but in the case of a small number who have had special preparation in 
their undergraduate courses (such as those who have graduated in sociology) 
arrangements are made by which the necessary work may be completed within twelve 
months. 

(17) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL OF NURSING 

( Miss E. K. Riissell ) 

In its effort to organise a satisfactory training for the public health nurse, this 
School is breaking new ground in the field of professional or technical education. 
This training must be provided because the very recently organised practice of 
preventive medicine — or public health work — has made it imperative that nurses 
be prepared to share in this work, and that they be prepared in a reasonably satis- 
factory and economical fashion. The task is not a simple one, and is made more 
complex by the fact that, in doing it, we cross the path of the traditional form of 
hospital training for nurses. However there is alreadv a better understanding of 
both the purpose, and the extent, of the work and graduallv the fact of the Schools 
existence is being made known to the public. With this knowledge and understanding 
there is coming a better chance to enrol suitable students. The difficulties in the way 
of enrolment will be better appreciated when it is understood that the successful 
candidate for this work needs to be above the average in intelligence, in character 
and in personality and also must have financial backing that will enable her In pay 
for a three year training course. 

In additional to this pioneer work — very definitely of the nature of educational 
research — the School is carrying an increasingly heavy load of teaching for graduate 
nurses. Very rapidly it has been called upon to serve as a central school for the 
whole Province and to it come large numbers of staff nurses from the other nursing 
schools, from the hospitals and from the public health field. With hospital and 
public health practice developing as rapidly as they are, some such provision for 



100 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

graduate study must be made. Altogether more than 500 students have passed 
through the School during the past year. 

Visitors and students from abroad come to the School every year — also in 
increasing numbers. Throughout the twelve months of the year they come and go, 
absorbing much of the time of a limited staff, but also giving much in return. It is 
probable that the Canadian students that study in this environment are particularly 
fortunate in the matter of educational values. 

The statistical report for the year is as follows: — 

Undergraduate course in Public Health Nursing and General Nursing 30 

Graduate nurses in the certificate courses 70 

Occasional students, including undergraduates from Toronto hospitals 172 

Enrolment in refresher courses 237 

509 

(18) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 

MILITARY STUDIES 

(Brig.-Gen. G. S. Cartu right, C.B., C.M.G.) 

I have the honour to report as follows upon the work carried out in this 
department during the academic year, 1936-37. 

The number of students taking Military Studies as an academic subject was 
disappointing; the second year being reduced to two, owing to the following 
reasons, — viz: two left the University, one transferred to Trinity College and two 
changed from general pass course (the only course in which Military Studies is 
included I to other courses. The enrolment in the special classes (Courses 4 to 7 in 
the Calendar) for War Office (O.T.C. ) Certificates was very satisfactory, — 100 
registering in these. 

I would again reiterate my contention that this course does not inculcate the desire 
for war, but, far from it, understanding what war means makes those who study it 
the soundest advocates for peace. 

Great Britain having tried the experiment of setting an example in the way of 
disarmament found herself powerless to enforce peace and now, to strengthen her 
armed forces so as to be in a position to protect herself and to exert pressure upon 
other nations in order to preserve peace in the world she has launched a staggeringly 
heavy loan and is feverishly increasing her navy, army and air forces as well as 
organising the nation for the supply, etc. of munitions of war; in fact, as Sir Samuel 
Hoare — Civil Lord of the Admiralty — ^stated. compressing the work of 10 years 
into 2. 

Canada is also taking steps to build up her defence forces; therefore, as in 
any great war (which all sane persons trust will not again occur to plunge the 
world into a futile, chaotic struggle) the demand for men trained as leaders will be 
most urgent, it seems only fair and just that all young men enjoying the advantages 
of a university education largely at the expense of the country, should consider it 
their duty towards the Empire to avail themselves of the training offered by the 
C. 0. T. C. and the Department of Military Studies to obtain a primary knowledge of 
military science so as to fit themselves for the duties of an officer should the necessity 
arise. 

Further, in taking up these studies a knowledge of map reading, history and 
geography of the British Empire and the requirements of leadership is acquired, all 
of which are valuable in any calling in civil life. 

The fact that this year 100 students enrolled in the special classes, which are 
voluntary and are, therefore, carried out in the student's spare time, indicates a 
desire for instruction in military matters. I would, therefore, urge in this my last 
report as Director of the Department of Military Studies that this subject may again 
be restored as an option in the honour courses in the university curriculum. 

The Military Studies courses prepare the students for the written portion of the 
exainination for O.T.C. certificates, but the practical training is carried out in the 
C. O.T.C; it is. therefore, hoped that as much encouragement as possible will be 
given to the University contingent of that corps. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



lOI 



I. 



( 19 1 REPORT OF THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES ( MEN ) 

I George D. Porter, M.B.. Director ) 

The report of the year shows that there have been 



Examinations : — 

First year students. 

Second 

Senior 



Total 



870 
701 
526 

2097 



There were also fourteen re-examined by specialists. The resuhs of the exaininations 
this year were very satisfactory. The physical condition of the students are excellent, 
only twentv-two being unfit for physical training, this is the best record we have 
ever had. 

Results : — 

Those found fit for physical training 96 % 

Those having some disability requiring •orrective or light 

exercises 2%% 

Those unfit for physical training 1-^% 

Twentv-two students are exempted for the following causes: — 

Duodenal ulcer 

Arthritis 

Stone in Kidney 

Chorea 

Nephritis 



Operations 8 

Infantile Paralysis 3 

Heart trouble 2 

Bronchitis 2 

Sinusitis 1 

Spinal trouble 1 

The average height of our first year students is 5 ft. 9^4 in. and their weight 
14314 lbs. This makes our highest average. 

The following are causes of absence from physical training classes, for periods 
varying from one day to three months: — 



Colds 182 

Influenza 61 

Bronchitis 11 

Pharyngitis 91 

Laryngitis 11 

Tonsillitis 8 

Pneumonia 1 

Mumps 2 

Chicken Pox 2 

Gastritis 5 

Enteritis 7 

Neuritis 3 

Gastric Ulcer 1 

Hernia 1 

385 

Injuries: — 

Concussion 3 

Dislocations 6 

Abrasions 9 

Locerations 19 

Blisters 14 

51 
Skin Diseases :— 

Eczema 2 

Pityriasis 1 

Local Infection 24 

Total 



Conjunctivitis 3 

Otitis Media 3 

Epistaxis 2 

Haemorhoids 1 

Appendicitis 5 

Sinusitis 2 

Migraine 2 

Gastralia 1 

Arthritis 4 

Vaccination 3 

Hay Fever 1 

Transfusion 2 

Inoculation 1 



30 



Sprains 29 

Fractures 5 

Cuts 32 

Burns H 

Spinal Injury 1 



Fiirunculosis 9 

Tinea 1 



Dental Trouble 
586. 



10 
5 



102 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Improvement in the physical condition of second year students is shown in the 
majority of cases. Twenty-five per cent, of those below category A.l. in their first 
year had their rating raised during the year, while only seven per cent, in all 
categories had their rating lowered. These latter were lowered owing to illness or 
accident during the year. 

Ninety-eight students were enrolled in the special classes under Mr. Martin, 
for the correction of such defects as round shoulders, flat feet, and spinal curvature. 
Forty-six others were enrolled for periods of from one to six weeks on account of 
injuries or disabilities, and those recovering from illness which prevented their taking 
the regular P.T. 

Apart from a widespread, but comparatively mild epidemic of influenza, the 
general health of the student body has been excellent. 

During the year, a large number of students came in for treatment of injuries 
received on the campus, and in the gymnasium. 

Dr. Charles Gossage attended these emergencies, between the hours of five to 
six-thirty o'clock, when accidents are most liable to occur. His services are greatly 
appreciated. 

Personal advice to many students, and lectures on personal hygiene, to those in 
the first year were given by the Director of Health Service. These were well 
attended as they were last year. 

We are greatly indebted to Prof. Andrew Hunter, professor of pathological 
chemistry, for undertaking the supervision of the urinalysis, in connection with the 
physical examination of students. 

(19) REPORT OF MEDICAL ADVISER OF WOMEN 

(Dr. Edith Gordon ) 
II. 

I beg to submit the report of the Medical Adviser of Women for the year 
1936-1937. 

Physical examinations were made on 189 women students of the first year in 
University College, medicine, household science, applied science and dentistry who 
are required to take two hours weekly of physical training. Their physical 
condition was excellent, and only a small number were asked to take the corrective 
work in place of the regular, or else excused from active participation in physical 
activities. These latter were asked to report to the Medical Office twice a week 
for a rest period or a walk. Thus close supervision was given to those who most 
needed it. Students from the other years of these same faculties, and from the 
other colleges and departments reported for physical examinations to the number 
of 331. In addition, 34 students from the Margaret Eaton School were examined. 
170 students playing in competitive games and sports were given examinations before 
participation in the games. Reexaminations of students throughout the year was 
made on those whose physical condition was not wholly satisfactory upon entrance. 
47 of these were made, and the results were gratifying in nearly every case, as 
improvement could be shown. 

The intercutaneous tuberculin tests made on the entering students showed a 
higher percentage of positive reactions this year, but the follow-up with X-rays of 
the chest did not bring to light any active cases of tuberculosis. Several students 
were followed carefully throughout the year because of the history of contact with 
active tuberculosis, or because the negative intercutaneous test of the previous year 
h?.d become positive. By doing this, it is hoped to discover incipient disease. 

The Medical Office is used constantly throughout the year by students of all 
faculties and years for consultations regarding problems of personal health. Con- 
siderable treatment of a very simple nature is given. The students are encouraged 
to report minor symptoms, so that diagnosis may be made early and treatment 
instituted at once. Many students are referred to their own physicians or to 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 103 

specialists. The Medical Adviser believes her work to be largely one of health 
education. 

47 vaccinations were performed, and a few Dick and Schick tests made. 125 
urinalyses were done. Through the courtesy of Dr. C. C. Benson of the department 
of food chemistry, several basal metabolic tests were made. The Medical Adviser 
is very grateful for this cooperation between departments. Dr. Melville Watson of 
the department of gynaecology has continued his work in dysmenorrhoea, and several 
students were sent to him for treatment with very satisfactory results in some cases. 
Miss Kathleen McMurrich of the department of anatomy made anthropometric 
measurements on 100 women students in the medical office for a research problem in 
centre of gravity. This and correlated statistical work should be a part of the work 
of the Medical Office, and much could be done if more assistance were available. 

Three talks were given in November to the entering women on personal hygiene. 
Two courses of lectures were given to the students in the course leading to a diploma 
in physical education; one of 25 lectures in first aid and personal hygiene to the 
first year, and 10 in physical diagnosis to the fourth year. Four lectures in personal 
hygiene were given to the students in the Public Health Nursing course. 

During the final examinations in May the Medical Office was open for students 
who were too ill to write their papers in the regular examination halls. Arrangements 
were made for them to write in the Medical Office. 63 women wrote 157 papers 
under the supervision of the Medical Adviser. 

Physical Examinations, 1936-1937: 

University College (entering students ) 159 

University College (others) 69 

Victoria College 37 

Trinity College 19 

St. Michael's College 14 

Medicine (entering students) 17 

Medicine (others) 2 

Household Science (entering students) 12 

Household Science (others) 6 

Dentistry 1 

School of Nursing (three years course) 36 

School of Nursing (one year course) 55 

Social Science 23 

Physiotherapy 8 

Occupational Therapy 3 

Ontario College of Education (Physical Training specialists) 40 

Library School 1 

Graduate Studies 11 

Miscellaneous (Art, Music, Optometry > 7 

Total 520 

Margaret Eaton School 34 

Total Examinations 554 

Students required to take physical training; first year University 

College, medicine, household science, applied science and 

dentistry • • • • 189 

Grades Al and A2 — physically able to participate in the required 

gymnastic and physical activities 86.2% 

Grade Bl — needing special corrective work 7.4% 

Grades B2 and C — excused from physical training requirement 

because of some temporary or permanent disability 6.4% 

(19) REPORT ON ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL TRAINING 

(T. A. Reed, Mus.Bac, Secretary. Athletic Association) 
III. 

The work of the department has been carried on under the direction of the 
director of athletics, Mr. Warren Stevens, with the assistance of Messrs. W. H. 
Martin, J. E. McCutcheon, W. W. Winterburn and Chas. Zwygard. In an endeavour 
to enlist more students in competitive activities, an intramural organisation was set 



104 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

up under the immediate control of Mr. McCutcheon who, for a committee, had the 
presidents from each of the undergraduate organisations of the thirteen colleges and 
faculties. The success of the venture was well exemplified in an increase of over 45 
per cent, in the number of students participating as compared with the interfaculty 
competitions of the previous year. Two new activities were foul shooting (a phase 
of basketball practice) and figure skating under Mr. Zwygard. The committee met 
each week and discussed the many problems involved. They conducted the various 
interfaculty schedules, adjudicated on all differences and have made valuable re- 
commendations to the Directorate for future guidance. The colleges and faculties 
donated a handsome trophy for annual award, this to be based on a point system not 
so much on the actual winning of awards but on the number of students (as com- 
pared with registration) who participated during the session. For the first year 
Trinity College was the proud winner with Applied Science second. 

Compulsory Physical Training 

This followed the usual programme based upon Danish gymnastics and with 
elementary apparatus and mat work. First year students were urged to take the 
Life Saving and Learn-to-Swim classes as part of their regular work and the usual 
options were allowed viz.. competitive athletics in seasonal games and enrolment in 
the Canadian Officers Training Corps. It is worthy of note that in this last there 
was an increase of 20 per cent, 210 students voluntarily choosing that form of 
activity. 

Enrolment 

Men students enrolled in the first and second years 1821 

From third and fourth years (being deficient in previous years) 17 

From WyclifTe College 3 

1841 
From this total must be deducted those: 

(flfl With credit for two years physical training but repeating academic 

work '. 205 

( b ) Exempt on medical and other grounds 49 

(d Withdrawn from college during the session or registration 

cancelled 35 

( d ) Failed to register 25 

314 

1527 
These 1527 elected to take their Physical Training as follows: 

In Physical Training classes 1 142 

In the Canadian Officers' Training Clorps 210 

In Special Classes for those unable to take regular work 85 

In the following Intercollegiate and Interfaculty sports (part time) : 

Rugby Football 207 

Soccer Football 48 

Track 45 

English Rugby 8 

Basketball 216 

Hockey 151 

Indoor Baseball 139 

Boxing, Wrestling and Fencing 129 

Swimming and Water Polo 68 

Lacrosse 39 

Volleyball 84 

Gymnastics 36 

Jui Jitsu 22 

1192 

2629 
Less those participating in two or more activities 1 102 

1527 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 105 

General Physical Training 

This work was again conducted on the same basis as the previous year. Mr. 
Charles Zwygard conducting the majority of the classes on the gymnasium floor, 
iMr. Winterburn in charge of the swimming, Mr. McCutcheon the activities covered 
by the intramural programme and Mr. Martin the special classes and general 
supervision of the boxing, fencing, wrestling and gymnastic work. 

There were twenty-four classes held each week on the main gymnasium floor 
and a similar number of special classes. Dr. Porter, the Director of Health Service, 
gave a series of health talks to the first year men which were largely attended and 
highly appreciated. 

In swimming, thirty-three periods were held each week, viz. thirteen "Learn- 
to-Swim" classes with two hundred and six enrolled, and twenty for instruction in 
Life Saving of which three hundred and fifty-six took advantage. A special class for 
student volunteer leaders had an enrolment of eighteen. One hundred and eighty- 
seven students received the Life Saving awards of the Royal Life Saving Society 
of England. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

The University of Toronto entered teams in all competitions. Of special 
moment was the winning of the coveted Yates Cup, emblematic of the championship 
in Senior Rugby in which Queen's University were worthy contenders to the last. 
The "Tom Gibson Cup," our Advisory Board's tribute to the memory of an out- 
standing graduate, brave athlete and soldier, was won by the team representing his 
Alma Mater, a notable victory for which credit must be given our honorary coach. 
Dr. Les. Black. Med. 1926, who, faced with mediocre material at the beginning of 
the session, rounded out a splendid team. Other championships were tennis, English 
rugby, golf, basketball, swimming and gymnastics in senior competition and tennis, 
track, basketball and swimming in intermediate. The University was represented by 
twenty-four teams, two hundred and eighty contestants wearing the Blue and White. 

To obtain the necessary competition for our senior team, prior to intercollegiate 
competitions, several friendly alliances have been formed with sister institutions 
across the line through the influence of our director of athletics. In addition to the 
usual basketball pre-season trips and the International Intercollegiate Hockev 
League, which now seems to be firmly established, the boxing, wrestling and fencing 
teams visited Syracuse, Rochester, Buffalo. Alfred and St. Lawrence; the harrier team 
visited Alfred and the swimming team Rochester, Buffalo and Syracuse. In all these 
contests they gave a good account of themselves and upheld the traditions of our 
University. 

Special mention should be made of the showing made by Larry O'Connor, a 
student in III U.C., who in addition to outstanding achievements in intercollegiate 
contests, made a new world's record in the sixty yard indoor hurdles at a meet held 
in the Maple Leaf Gardens on March 12th. 

Intramural Competition 

This wider term comprises the former interfacully activities. The schedule 
herewith indicates the widespread interest on the part of the students; for while 280 
represented the Lniversity in intercollegiate competition 1396 men turned out on 
college and faculty teams. 

Series Name of Cup 

Rugby Sir William Mulock 

Track W. L. Rowell Memorial 

Soccer Arts Faculty 

Harrier J. Brotherton 

Hockey W. T. Jennings 

Basketball Clifford Sifton 





Inter- 






faculty 




Winner 


Teams 


Plavers 


Victoria 


11 


280 


Victoria 




56 


Victoria 


9 


13S 


Wycliffe 




32 


Victoria 


13 


196 


Sr. U.C. 


24 


276 



106 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Lacrosse Dr. W. A. Dafoe Jr. S.P.S. 10 102 

Sr. Boxing, Wrest. & Fencing. . Francis Davison S.P.S. 51 

Jr. Boxing, Wrest. & Fencing. ., S.P.S. 45 

Indoor Baseball A. G. Spalding & Co. Dentistry 18 241 

Swimming A.M. Fitzgerald Trinity 98 

Water Polo H. P. Eckardt Jr. Meds 9 106 

Indoor Track Toronto Cricket Club Trinity 74 

Tennis F. Y. McEachren W. P. Pigott, S.P.S. II 49 

Gymnastics H. A. Wilson S.P.S. 19 

Volleyball Victoria College Staff Sr. Meds. 16 188 



1938 
Less those participating in two or more sports 542 



Number of contestants 1396 

The John C. H. Copp Memorial Trophy, awarded annually to the member of the 
senior rugby team adjudged worthiest, was this year, by the unanimous vote of his 
fellows, awarded to A. D. (Al.) Williams, of the graduating year in Medicine and 
a member of the Athletic Directorate. 

Our arena was again used for the Promenade Symphony Concerts, an innovation 
in the musical life of our city that now, after three seasons, seems to have become a 
permanency. Twenty concerts were given under Mr. Reginald Stewart, over 100,000 
people attending. Although not intended for such purposes, the acoustics of the 
arena make it admirably suited for such concerts and it is possible to seat over 7,000 
people at popular prices. The University is thus making a fine contribution to the 
artistic life of the community. It is only fair to add that the work involved adds 
considerably to the labours of the staff of the Athletic Office. 

The Athletic Direcorate 

The Athletic Directorate for 1936-37 consisted of Dr. J. A. McColIum (Presi- 
dent). Professor T. R. Loudon. Professor S. Beatty, Dr. W. Easson Brown, Messrs. 
M. F. Williams (Vice-President), J. D. Caldwell, E. A. Greco, N. H. McClelland, 
F. N. Smith, A. D. Williams, and ex officio. Dr. G. D. Porter, Medical Director; 
Warren Stevens, Athletic Director; and T. A. Reed, Financial Secretary. 



(19) DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

STUDENTS 

{Miss I. G. Coventry, Director of Physical Education) 
IV. 

In the past year, 1936-37, there were 189 students registered in the physical 
education classes and approximately 709 class periods of instruction were directed 

by ItlC pliyoio«»l Jiro/^tor nnd tWf) r^ssistflnts, A'li'is J M Pnrctpr nnrl IVIrs. IVT Ciraham. 

Required Physical Training: The required physical training classes with an 
enrolment of 171 students were subdivided into 15 class periods a week. This plan, 
as formerly, assisted principally in accommodating the students who presented varied 
academic timetables and also lessened the congestion in the inadequate gymnasium 
quarters. 

The students enrolled in the regular classes were required to take the final tests 
in general gymnastics and corrective exercises at the end of the year. The annual 
report of these examinations was submitted to the Registrar. 

Corrective and Remedial Classes: Class periods of corrective and remedial 
gymnastics were given to the students who were medically advised to take the special 
course arranged for their benefit. The physical director personally supervised this 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



107 



important part of physical training. Frequently such good results were obtained 
that it enabled the students to return to the regular classes. 

Number of students from University College 151 



Faculty of Medicine. 

Household Science. 
" " Music 

Dentistry 

Trinity College 



13 
3 
1 
1 
3 



Four Year Diploma Course in Physical Education (in conjunction with the 
pass arts course I : There were 17 students registered in this course and approximately 
694 class periods of lectures and instruction were given during the year. Theory 
subjects numbered 252 and practice subjects numbered 442. 

The women graduates, who have been granted the diploma in physical education 
by the University of Toronto, continue to be appointed physical directors in the 
Ontario schools. 

Swimming: There were 217 students from all colleges, faculties and depart- 
ments and over 360 periods of instruction in elementary and advanced swimming 
and life saving given by Mr. A. L. Cochrane and Miss A. Cochrane during the 
session of seven months. 

Number of students from University College 124 

" Victoria College 45 

" Trinity College 15 

" St. Michael's College 1 

" Faculty of Medicine 1 

" •' ■' Music 1 

Household Science 2 

Social Science 7 

" School of Nursing 15 

Administrative StaflF 6 



V. 



(19) REPORT ON ATHLETICS FOR WOMEN 
{Miss A. E. M. Parkes) 



The activities of the Women's Athletic Association in the University of Toronto 
during the session 1936-37 have been little changed from previous years, and it 
would seem that, until better accommodation is provided for the various sports, 
there can be no great increase in the numbers taking part nor in the types of 
competition. 

Each college organised a meet in tennis, swimming and badminton during the 
year, and interfaculty competition was arranged in these three sports as well as 
basketball, hockev. baseball ^r^A c-'^ c. J„.c„ ^"d-.'-fe t-"^^ \"c"'7,r\ ...^.^ ^c a.^^^ 
activities were registered in University, Victoria, Trmity and St. Michael s Colleges, 
the Faculty of Medicine, the School of Nursing, the Departments of Occupational 
Therapy and Physiotherapy, Social Science and Physical Education, and the Library 
School. Several teams were coached by graduate students registered in the Ontario 
College of Education. The women of Victoria College celebrated their centenary by 
winning five interfaculty championships, tennis, basketball, hockey, baseball and 
badminton, while the individual champions in tennis and swimming, Miss C. H. D. 
Walsh and Miss M. H. B. Bailey, were also from that College. The interfaculty 
swimming championship was won by University College. 

Intercollegiate competition included tennis and swimming, won by Toronto, 
and basketball, won by the University of Western Ontario. No University team in 
hockey was organised this year due to lack of suitable competition. 



108 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

In the seven interfaculty competitions sponsored by the Association, students 
were registered as follows: 

No. of 
Sport Entries Competitors 

Golf Individual entries. 42 

Tennis 4 teams from University, Victoria, St. Hilda's and 

St. Michael's, and individual entries. 35 

Basketball 10 teams. University College (3), Victoria (2), St. 

Hilda's. St. Michael's. Medicine, Nursing and 

Physiotherapy. 130 

Hockey 4 teams. University College, Victoria ( 2 ) , St. Hilda's 

and St. Michael's. 61 

Swimming 4 teams. University College. Victoria. St. Hilda's 

and Physical Education, and individual entries. 45 

Badminton 5 teams. University College, Victoria, St. Hilda's, 

St. Michael's and Nursing. 20 

Baseball 3 teams. Victoria ( 2 ) and St. Michael's. 30 

The Association was again financed by the proceeds from parking stations 
conducted by the women undergraduates during football games and by a contribution 
from the men's Association. 

The Athletic Directorate for the year 1936-37 was made up as follows: Dr. C. C. 
Benson. President. Mrs. W. A. KirkAvood, Mrs. W. B. Elsley. Dr. Edith Gordon, and 
the Misses J. M. Forster. E. M. Hall, E. G. Kennedy, M. M. F. Vining, G. I. Wagg, 
E. S. Wilson, I. L. Wright and A. E. M. Parkes, Financial Secretary. 

(201 REPORT OF THE WARDEN OF HART HOUSE 

(/. B. Bickersteth, Esq., M.C., M.A. ) 
General 

The undergraduate membership in Hart House during the past year was 3680 
and the senior membership 671, making a total of 4351 members. The senior 
membership was larger than that in the previous year, but the students were less by 
over 100, the number of male undergraduates in the University having decreased. 
It was found necessary at the opening of the academic year to raise the price of 
meals in the Great Hall and this, as was to be expected, resulted in a smaller 
attendance. None the less a considerable number of men regularly took their meals 
there and this number was materially increased in November by various changes 
suggested and put into effect by the Hall Committee with the approval of the Board 
of Stewards and the Finance Committee. The twenty-four oak tables in the Great 
Hall were darkened in order to match the new chairs, the expense of this being borne 
bv the Massey Foundation. The shop where light refreshments, cigarettes, gymnasium 
cloihco gnd other articles are sold had a remarkably successful year. An interesting 
experiment was the sale of coloured reproductions of well known pictures framed 
and ready to hang on the walls of an undergraduate's room. Some 95 of these re- 
productions were sold. The usual social functions were held during the winter, the 
Lniversity College Follies and School Night being the most widely attended. Some 
1,700 persons were present on these two occasions. The Masquerade took place 
succes&full> ill N^jvciiiLci, Lui ilic iiuiijLi_j.o c>4:<:on.J:r>^ \Azt^r(^ CD HI DflT ati vcl V small and 
the future of this dance is under consideration. There was an excellent demand lor 
tickets for the Graduates Ball and this function is of great value in providing a dance 
for senior members on New Year's Eve at a reasonable price. Hart House was thrown 
open to the public on the first Visitors' Day of term at the end of October and nearly 
1.000 persons took this opportunity of inspecting the building. The Athletic Associa- 
tion dinner was again held in the Great Hall in March with outstanding success. 
Alumni Night also took place in March and attracted a large attendance, the whole 
building being put at the disposal of the Alumni Federation. At the University 
Settlement party held at the end of the Christmas term some 300 men and boys were 
entertained by Hart House. The Warden's Christmas dinner was held at the beginning 
of the Christinas vacation and the soinewhat smaller numbers of men attending it 
is an indication of better times inasmuch as many undergraduates who live in distant 
part of Canada were able to go home. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 109 

Art 

The artists whose work was exhibited in the art gallery during the winter were 
Charles Comfort. Peter Haworth and Mrs. Haworth, Cawthra Mulock, Wendell 
Lawson. Barbara Niven. David Mihie. a group of Toronto portrait painters including 
Sir Wvly Grier. Kenneth Forbes. Charles MacGregor. Evan Macdonald. Franklin 
Arbuckle, Allan Barr. Marion Long. Archibald Barnes, Dorothy Stevens and C. F. 
Comfort. There was an exhibition of sculpture by Jacobine Jones and also a show 
of German and Spanish posters. The three exhibitions of work done by members of 
the University were also of outstanding interest, namely the photographic exhibition 
arranged bv the Camera Committee, the display of work done by undegraduates 
consisting of paintings and drawings together with sculpture and other exhibits from 
the arts and crafts room, and lastly the exhibition of paintings done by faculty and 
graduate members. During the year reproductions of paintings by Flemish, Dutch 
and German Masters were shown in the print room as well as Indian prints. Chinese 
wood-blocks and the Barbizon school. Before Christmas Dr. P. H. Brieger gave three 
talks on town planning and after Christmas Professor H. R. MacCallum spoke on 
\\ illiam Blake and Mr. Eric Newton on the attitude of the craftsman. The art classes 
conducted by Mr. H. S. Palmer again attracted a steady attendance of some 20 
undegraduates and senior members. Modelling, bookbinding, lino-cuts and etchings 
were carried out in the arts and crafts room by a group of members under the 
direction of Mr. Carl Schaefer. During the summer the walls of the art gallery and 
of the print room were recovered with hessian, the wooden surrounds were removed 
and the plaster areas were painted white. The lighting was also improved. These 
changes have immenselv improved the appearance of these two galleries which may 
now be considered the equal of any in Canada. Two pictures were purchased during 
the vear — "R. R. No. 3 Hanover" by Carl Schaefer and "Pines in Winter" by the late 
Homer Watson. In September the collection of pictures owned by Hart House was 
inspected bv an expert from the National Gallery at Ottawa who recommended the 
immediate repair of Tom Thomson's "The Pointers" as being a picture of national 
importance. This canvas as well as two others have been repaired at the National 
Gallerv through the courtesy of Mr. Eric Brown. The Art Committee appealed to a 
group of interested persons for small contributions towards the Print Fund and 
using some of these funds have purchased a number of prints needed to improve the 
collection already owned by Hart House. 

Music 

As in past vears the Great Hall was packed on the occasion of each of the eight 
Sunday Evening Concerts which were given by the following artists: Scott Malcolm 
and Reginald Godden ( double piano I . Alberto Guerrero, the Tudor Singers. Elie 
Spivak. the Toronto Trio. Emmy Heim and Eugene Katsh. the Hart House Glee Club 
and the Conservatory String Quartet. The attendance at the Friday Recitals was 
admirable throughout the year. These informal recitals held at 5 p.m. in the music 
room give a rare opportunity for undergraduates to hear chamber music arranged by 
leading musicians of the citv. some of the artists this year being Sir Ernest MacMillan, 
Tom Brennand. Muriel Donnellan. Reginald Stewart. George Lambert. Viggo Kihl, 
Wilma Stevenson. Albert Pratz and Walter Whitaker. There is ample evidence that 
the Songsters which were again conducted by Mr. Campbell Mclnnes on eight Sunday 
evenings are making their influence felt in different parts of Canada. Members are 
also very grateful to Mr. Ross Workman who directed the Midday Sing Songs with 
great success. Hart House is indeed fortunate in being able to count on the whole- 
hearted support of the musicians of Toronto who alone make possible the brilliant 
programme of musical events during the winter season. The Hart House Glee Club 
had a most successful season under Dr. Charles Peaker. By December, 1936, there 
were 100 members who had paid their fee. A number of concerts were given in and 
around the University and an admirable programme was performed at the last 
Sunday Evening Concert. Instead of a Friday Recital in the music room which was 
impossible owing to the size of the club carols were sung in the Great Hall during 



no REPORT OF THE No. 12 

dinner on the last Monday of term before Christmas and the experiment was 
sufiiciently successful to justify its repetition next winter. After careful consideration 
the Glee Club Committee has been made a Special Committee with a faculty member 
as Chairman and directly responsible as are other Special Committees to the Board 
of Stewards. 

Debates 

Five debates were held during the year, the resolutions dealing with Canada's 
defence problems, the rival claims of fascism and communism, the influence of 
the press, the functions of the law and provincial rights. Honorary visitors included 
representatives from Edinburgh, London and McGill Universities. The attendance 
at these debates varied and the standard of speaking is probably not as high as it was 
several years ago. It is, however, well known that university debating has it ups and 
downs. There is certainly no sign that the interest of the undergraduates in domestic 
or international affairs is any less keen than it was. There is also unmistakable 
e\-idence that the system of debating as worked out in Hart House over a period of 
vears is being copied not only in many parts of Ontario but in the Western Provinces. 
Two \ew Zealand debaters were entertained in Hart House during April, but it was 
too late in the year to arrange a debate. 

Library 

About 100 new volumes were purchased during the year and a number of books 
which had become out of date were removed. The committee have done everything 
possible to maintain the collection under their care at a high standard. About 
S250.00 is spent each year on new books, the funds at the disposal of the committee 
for this purpose being from a special grant by the Massey Foundation. A few 
private press books were added to the collection already possessed by the House. 
It is verv satisfactorv to report that though the library was used by literally thousands 
of men during the course of the year and there is no direct supervision of the room 
the net loss of books was eight. Some trouble was experienced by the removal of 
periodicals from the reading-room, but the action taken by the committee has done 
something to meet the problem. Two "library evenings" were held when the speakers 
were Mr. William Strange and Dr. Richard Roberts. The upholstered furniture is 
being recovered in red leather and steps were taken to improve the lighting. 

Student Christian Movement 

This year the Student Christian Mov.ement arranged a particularly interesting 
series of noondav addresses in the music room which were well attended, Professor 
Burton, Mr. Hugh Redwood and the Rev. J. R. P. Sclater being among the speakers. 
Holy Communion was celebrated in Hart House Chapel on certain Sundays. Weekly 
prayers were also held there as well as a series of Lenten addresses. The use of the 
Chapel for private prayer and meditation is increasing. At the end of the year the 
Board of Stewards drew attention to the valuable work which the Rev. Wilfred Lock- 
hart was doing as secretary of the S.C.M. Perhaps the most interesting event this 
year was the visit of the Rev. Harold Ellis of the Community of the Resurrection. 
When it was found that Father Ellis would be in Canada arrangements were made 
for him to spend November and December in the University. During those weeks 
he made the acquaintance of a large number of students in every faculty and college 
as well as in the university residences and in fraternities and received a warm welcome 
wherever he went. It was made absolutely clear from the first that his only lobject 
was to deal with the fundamental truths of the Christian faith. There have been 
many proofs of the value of Father Ellis' work which was largely carried out with 
small groups of men or with individuals. Four years ago Dr. Richard Roberts held 
a "mission" in the University and it would seem desirable to make some definite 
spiritual eff^ort of this kind at least once in every student generation. 

A fresco executed by Mr. Will Ogilvie, the well-known Toronto artist, has been 
been placed on the upper part of the walls of the Chapel. Specially designed chairs 
have been substituted for the heavy pews and additional panelling has been installed. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 Ul 

When the new lighting and furnishings have been completed the Chapel should be 
in every way worthy of Hart House. Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Massey have taken the 
keenest personal interest in these alterations and the entire cost of them is bein<» 
borne by the Massey Foundation. 

Theatre 

The plays produced by Hart House under the direction of Mrs. Nancy Pyper 
were as follows: "One More River", "This Mad World". "The Snow Queen", 
"Merrily We Roll Along" and "The Abbe Prevost". One of the most successful 
experiments during the winter was a miniature drama festival in which University 
College, Trinity College. Victoria College and St. Michael's College took part, each 
performing a one-act play. The Cody Award was won by University College. This 
evening of plays which drew a packed house was arranged by the University Drama 
Committee, the existence of which owes much to the initiative of Mr. C. R. Delafield. 
There is no question that dramatic work of this kind among the colleges and faculties 
of the University is of the greatest value and should be further developed. The 
theatre was also used by the college dramatic societies for their annual plays and by 
the University Club. The Central Ontario Drama Festival took place in the theatre 
this year during the last week of February. 

Visitors 

The number of visitors who come to Hart House from distant parts of Canada 
and various parts of the world continues to be very great. There are davs when 
three or four different parties arrive unannounced and it is sometimes difficult for the 
staff to find time to show them round. Among more prominent visitors during the 
last twelve months may be mentioned: Captain Wedderburn and a partv of English 
public school boys. Sir T. F. Molony ( Vice-Chancellor of the University of Dublin), 
Mr. Charles Buxton, Mr. Robert Mackie (General Secretary of the Student Christian 
Movement in England I , Mme de Palencia and Marcelino Domingo ( Spanish Govern- 
ment delegates I . Mr. W illiam Arnold-Forster. Mr. Hugh Redwood. Sir Anthony 
Jenkinson, the Hon. C. D. Howe, Lord Cobham. the Bishop in Corea, Mr. J. C. 
Lovelock (the Olympic champion runner). Rebecca West. Dr. Chen Han-Seng. Dr. 
Howard Thurman ( President of Howard University. Washington I . the Hon. T. 
Rinfret, Mr. Edward Bradby, the Hon. Peter Heenan, Dr. Niels Bohr, Mr. Eric 
Newton (the art critic), Mr. George de Warfaz (Drama Festival adjudicator). Mr. 
Harold Macmillan, M.P., Baron Silvercruys. M. Andre Malroux, Mr. Donald Grant, 
Mr. Collin Brooks ( editor of the Sunday Despatch I . Their Excellencies the Governor- 
General and Lady Tweedsmuir paid an official visit to Hart House in February and 
were received by the Board of Stewards. 

Committees 

The control of Hart House, subject to the ultimate authority of the Board of 
Governors of the University, is in very large measure entrusted to a number of 
standing and special committees. At the present time there are about 130 men 
serving on these committees. Of these about 100 are undergraduates and the rest 
are faculty or graduate members. As time passes much that was undefined and in an 
experimental stage in the early years has become settled and a matter of routine. 
Experience has taught the best methods of procedure and these are not likely to be 
radically changed. This was particularly true of the House and Hall Committees 
both of which are largely concerned with matters of administration. After careful 
consideration it was decided to amalgamate these two bodies under the title of the 
House Committee and it is hoped that this will lead to greater efficiency and prevent 
overlapping. As stated above, the Glee Club Committee has been made a special 
committee and Professor H. R. Kemp has kindly consented to take over the chair- 
manship. This year the Rev. E. C. LeBel (House), Professor M. St. A. Woodside 
(Music), Mr. W. E. Carswell (Art) and Professor E. W. Mclnnis (Debates) retire 
from the Chairmanship of their respective committees and Mr. N. J. McLean retires 
as graduate member of the Library Committee. All these five senior members have 



112 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

given hours of their time and expert knowledge to the affairs of Hart House and all 
members are deeply grateful to them and also to the other senior men who so 
willingly serve on the various committees of the House. This summer Mr. D. L. 
Emond who joined the administrative staff in 1926 is severing his connection with 
Hart House. During that period he has made a very distinctive contribution to the 
life of the House and his departure is very sincerely regretted. 

.'21t REPORT OF THE ACTLNG DIRECTORS OF THE CONNAUGHT 

LABORATORIES 

( Drs. R. D. Dejries and C. H. Best ) 

In the absence of the director. Dr. J. G. FitzGerald, who was granted a yesr's 
leave of absence from the University of Toronto to undertake a survey of the 
teaching of preventive medicine and hygiene in the leading medical colleges of North 
America and Europe under the auspices of the Rockefeller Foundation, it is our 
pleasure to present this, the twenty-third annual report of the Connaught Laboratories, 
as a review of activities for 1936-37. 

In the first report made to the Board of Governors on June 30, 1914. Dr. 
FitzGerald presented his conception of the field of service of the new'ly established 
"Antitoxin Laboratory." The preparation and distribution of biological products 
essential in the furtherance of public health, not only in Ontario but throughout 
Canada, was visualised and at the same time equal stress was laid on the importance 
of providing facilities for research in the field of preventive medicine. It is interest- 
ing also that in this first report particular mention was made of the contribution 
which the laboratory could make to the teaching of preventive medicine, forecasting 
the intimate relationship which has existed between the School of Hygiene and the 
Connaught Laboratories. The successive annual reports record the development of 
these purposes and constitute an achievement which has attracted world-wide 
attention. 

During the past year the senior research staff has been augmented by Dr. 
Ronald Hare of Queen Charlotte's Hospital, London, and Dr. Geoffrey Rake of the 
Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. Dr. Hare is well known for important 
contributions in bacteriology, and Dr. Rake also for his work in this field. Dr. 
P. A. T. Sneath, one of the senior members of the research staff, resigned in March 
to accept an important appointment in the British Colonial Medical Service. In 
addition to his research appointment in the Connaught Laboratories, he had given 
valuable service in the School of Hygiene as lecturer in parasitology. Although not 
a member of the Connaught Laboratories, Dr. Kenneth Brandon conducted valuable 
studies in the department of epidemiology and biometrics through a grant made by 
the Laboratories. Dr. Brandon was appointed as a member of the Metropolitan 
Health Board of Vancouver and assumed his new appointment in December. A 
further serious loss was occasioned bv the resignation of Dr. A. H. Sellers, also a 
member of the department of epidemiology and biometrics, to accept an appointment 
as medical statistician in the Department of Health of Ontario. Dr. Sellers, however, 
will continue in a part-time capacity as demonstrator in biometrics. 

Section of Barteriology and Immunology 

Lnder the direction of Professor Donald Eraser, a number of important in- 
vestigations have been continued and certain projects initiated. The results of three 
years' study of the antitoxin response in children to three injections of diphtheria 
toxoid have recently been brought together in a comprehensive report and submitted 
for publication. This research has been undertaken with the co-operation of Dr. 
Alan Young. Department of Public Health. Toronto, who assumed responsibility for 
the initial Schick testing of the children, the readings, the administration of toxoid, 
and the procuring the blood samples at certain time-intervals. Approximately six 
hundred titrations have been determined for the group as a whole, as well as the 
rate of loss of antitoxin over the period of three years. These determinations permit 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 113 

of the formulatioti of a standard of measurement or yard-stick with which to assess 
the antigenicity of any given diphtheria toxoid. A study of this character in which 
the antigenicity of toxoid is assessed in children requires much careful preparation 
and detailed organisation in the field. Dr. Martel. District Medical Officer, Amos, 
Quebec, assumed the responsibility for the use of high Lf and average Lf toxoid and 
Dr. A. L. McKay and Eh-. R. P. Hardman of the Department of Health. Ontario, for 
other diphtheria toxoids. \^ithout this co-operation it would not have been possible 
to undertake the study. The practical result of these investigations lies in the 
fact that no experimental evidence has been brought forward to suggest a change in 
the procedure of active immunisation advocated and instituted in Canada more than 
ten years ago. 

A survey of diphtheria carriers, initiated three years ago, is being continued. 
Through the co-operation of Dr. A. B. Moffat, Department of Public Health, Toronto, 
nose and throat swabs have been taken from school children. The sampling is 
made in such a wav that approximately one hundred cultures from different schools 
are examined ei^ch week. In this way the survey represents a cross-section of the 
school population and is essentially continuous in character. In collaboration with 
Professor Grant Fleming, department of preventive medicine, McGill University, a 
somewhat similar survey is being made in Montreal. The results in both cities have 
shown that the diphtheria carrier rate is exceedingly low. Among 7,800 cultures 
examined in Toronto the number of virulent diphtheria cultures found was four. 
These findings are in harmony with the low diphtheria rates in Montreal and in 
Toronto, and do not support the contention that in an activelv immunised population 
the carrier rate is high. 

In co-operation with Dr. Alan Young and the Department of Public Health, 
Toronto, an extensive survey has been carried out among children of the city 
schools to determine the duration of immunity, as shown by the Schick test, after 
three injections of toxoid. The results indicate that it is advisable and practicable 
to renew^ the immunity, as advocated by Ramon, by giving a subsequent dose of 
toxoid I '"dose de vappel"). 

Dr. M. H. Brown and Miss E. A. Anderson have continued their studies of 
pneumococci isolated from patients at the Hospital for Sick Children. Approximately 
350 strains of pneumococci have been isolated and typed from 500 speciments 
submitted. Of these approximately 35 per cent, were of type I; 12 per cent, type 
V; 9 per cent, type III; 6 per cent, type VII; 6 per cent, type IX. Approximately 
90 strains fell into twenty-three other types. Fifty additional strains were bile 
soluble but did not fall within the Cooper types of Pneumococci. These strains were 
isolated from various lesions; 234 were from cases of pneumonia. This time- 
consuming study has a verv practical bearing upon the selection of strains for the 
preparation of sera for therapeutic use. Dr. Brown has found that certain of the 
original Cooper strains have lost their specificity. This indicates the necessity of 
reaching an international agreement upon the standardisation of strains used for 
typing pneumococci. 

A preliminary investigation into the production of therapeutic antipneumococcus 
rabbit serum has been carried on. The results obtained with type I serum have 
been encouraging. 

Dr. Brown has investigated a number of recently isolated strains of S. typhi 
regarding the diphasic phenomenon of Kauffmann, the alpha and beta phases. 
It has been found that strains of S. typhi on primary isolation are usually in the 
alpha phase. Dr. Brown and Miss Anderson have carried on an investigation on the 
incidence in Canada of the members of the Salmonella group. Through the co- 
operation of the directors of the various laboratories across Canada, cultures having 
the characteristics of this group have been received and identified by carbohydrate 
and serological reactions. To date approximately 200 cultures have been studied. 
The high incidence of B. paratyphosus beta has been shown. It has become in- 
creasingly apparent that a central committee should be charged with the setting 
up of standard type sera. 



114 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Dr. Frieda Eraser has explored the resistance of rabbits actively immunised 
with a strain of haemolytic streptococcus of marked virulence for rabbits, and 
investigated the properties of the serum of such actively immunised animals. The 
protective antibody bears no apparent relationship to its agglutinin content and 
appears to be strain specific. Dr. Helen Plummer has completed the study of the 
comparative streptococcus antitoxin content of sera from persons living in the tropics 
and in Canada. Over ninety per cent, of tropical sera contain more than one unit 
of streptococcus antitoxin as compared with sixty per cent, of Canadian sera. 

The results of Dr. P. A. T. Sneath's research on experimental tetanus and 
the resistance of actively immunised animals to "lethal spore doses" (tetanus spores 
plus CaCb ) appeared in a publication in the American Journal of Hygiene entitled 
"Tetanus Immunity." 

Dr. J. S. Kitching has continued his study of the staphylococcus-antitoxin 
content of the serum of persons by age-groups. His results show that there is a 
relatively low content between the ages of two and five years and also later, during 
th adolescent period. In collaboration with Dr. L. N. Farrell he has explored the 
antigenicity of various preparations of staphylococcus toxoid and their keeping 
qualities. These studies are of practical value in relation to the clinical use of 
staphylococcus toxoid. In co-operation with the department of paediatrics. Dr. 
Kitching has followed, by serial titration, the staphylococcus content of sera of 
patients suifering from staphylococcus infection. The results of this study have a 
practical bearing on the therapeutic use of staphylococcus antitoxin. Investigations 
regarding the role of staphylococcus antibacterial immunity have been instituted and 
preliminary observations would suggest that such immunity can be produced by 
vaccination of horses with suitable strains. 

Dr. Nelles Silverthorne has continued his study on the prophylactic value of 
pertussis vaccine. In collaboration with Dr. Charles Farquharson, Medical Officer 
of Health, Scarboro. Ontario, part of this clinical trial is being carried out among 
children of the Scarboro district. Among some five hundred children given a total 
quantity of upwards of ten billion bacilli in four injections, the results strongly 
suggest that the vaccine is effective as a prophylactic. Clinical and laboratory studies 
in meningococcal and in influenzal {H. influenzae) meningitis are being actively 
pursued by Dr. Silverthorne. He has shown that the serum of actively immunised 
guinea-pigs is bactericidal for freshly isolated strains of these micro-organisms, when 
the experimental animals are inoculated with vaccines prepared from suitable strains 
of the meningococcus and the influenza bacillus respectively. A guinea-pig anti- 
influenza serum, frozen and dried under vacuum to preserve its complement, has given 
encouraging clinical results. The isolation and classification of H. inflenzae strains 
from cases and from carriers is being continued. 

Dr. Ronald Hare, late Eirst Assistant, Research Laboratories, Queen Charlotte 
Hospital, London, whose appointment to the staff of the Connaught Laboratories, 
and the teaching staff of the department of hygiene and preventive medicine is 
recorded elswhere, has a wide experience in research and his service in teaching 
has been greatly appreciated during the past session. Dr. Hare has devoted his 
time chiefly to research on the virus of influenza. Through the co-operation of the 
department of medicine, certain cases of clinical influenza were made available for 
study, from which a number of strains of virus were isolated and compared with 
the W.S. and Pr^ strains from England and the United States. The virus-neutralising 
properties of sera of contacts and patients, before and after an attack of influenza, 
have been determined. The possibilities of prophylactic inoculation, and of treat- 
ment of the established disease by passive immunity are being explored. Research 
in this field is hedged in by many practical difficulties and demands training and 
exactitude of a high order, for which reason progress is necessarily slow. 
Section of Chemistry in Relation to Hygiene 

The investigations which have been carried out under the direction of Professor 
P. J. Moloney have, as in the past, been concerned chiefly with diphtheria toxoid 
and Schick toxin. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 115 

Dr. Edith M. Taylor has completed a valuable piece of work on the League of 
Nations standard requirements for Schick toxin. It was shown that the antitoxic 
combining power of Schick toxin has little significance for humans in respect of the 
level of antitoxin detected; and further, that the toxicity requirement of the League 
of Nations was too low. Hence, Schick toxin of enhanced toxicity made from un- 
modified toxin containing little or no toxoid was found to be more satisfactory than 
that made from, toxin matured by phenol according to the League of Nations require- 
ment, inasmuch as the former gave more distinct and more readily interpretable 
reactions. 

A series of experiments was carried out in order to test the suitability of various 
diluents for Schick toxin and to determine the effect of preservation on diluted 
diphtheria toxin. 

Dr. Taylor has continued her work on the production of diphtheria toxin from 
hog's stomach autolysate with a \dew to simplifying and improving the method for 
large-scale production. This has resulted in more efficient methods for the removal 
of fat and precipitates which are formed during the preparation of the medium. 

Dr. M. Doreen Smith has carried out a comprehensive survey of Kay-Graham's 
phosphatase test for pasteurized milk. Through the co-operation of the Department 
of Health of Ontario and the Department of Public Health, Toronto, numerous 
samples of raw and pasteurised milks from the various sections of Ontario were made 
available. \^ hen the Ontario milks labelled pasteurised were judged by the modified 
phosphatase test, 88 per cent, were found to be properly pasteurised. 

A further study conducted by Dr. Smith related to the detoxifying properties 
of a number of human biles. It was found that, as in the case of ox bile, certain 
human biles contain a heat-labile detoxifying mechanism. 

Mr. M. D. Orr has concerned himself in part wuth a study of the antigenicity 
and reactivity of modified toxoid. To this end a number of amines were prepared 
from fatty acids of high molecular weight. A study of the precipitating properties 
of these amines for diphtheria toxoid and for other proteins was carried out under 
varying conditions of temperature and concentration of salts. It was found that in 
the absence of dissolved salts the precipitation of toxoid or other protein by synthetic 
amines occurs only in a narrow zone of concentration. Amine-toxoid precipitates 
when tested on laboratory animals showed increased antigenicity and lowered 
reactivity as compared with unaltered toxoid. 

Section of Filterable Viruses, Epidemiology and Biometrics 

Satisfactory progress has been made mider the direction of Professor R. D. 
Defries. Dr. James Craigie and Dr. F. 0. Wishart have continued their investigations 
into the serology and immunology of vaccine and smallpox virus. Various improve- 
ments in technique have been effected, and further in vitro evidence of a third highly 
labile antigen has been obtained. Direct evidence of the liberation of LS antigen 
by the virus has been elicited. It has been found that the LS antigen does not absorb 
neutralising antibodies for the virus, while other evidence suggests that this antigen 
represents an antigenic residuum of the unstable third antigen. Apparent spontaneous 
cleavage of the LS antigen has been observed, using a precipitin absorption technique. 
Dr. Yen has collaborated in a study of the stable S antigen which remains after 
destruction of the labile L component of the LS antigen. Observations on the pro- 
duction of immunity in rabbits with killed virus have been extended and verified 
by effecting a similar immunity with preparations (gradocol filtrates) of soluble 
virus-free antigen. Dr. Craigie has evolved a method of showing intracellular changes 
in vaccinia-infected cells which are not apparent in preparations subjected to the 
usual histological methods. Ultra-violet photographs have been obtained which are 
interpreted as displaying the various stages of the multiplication of the virus inside 
the cell. 

Dr. Craigie and Dr. Yen have continued the study of V phages specific for the 
V form of the B. typhosus^ and a number of interesting facts have come to light. 
Although the point of attack of these phages on B. typhosus is represented by theVi 



116 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

antigen, it has been found that the phages in question belong to four distinct sero- 
logical groups. These phages act on growing of B. typhosus in two ways. When 
applied in sufficient concentrations, they inhibit growth of all V form strains. On 
the other hand, some of the phages multiply and produce lysis only on certain 
strains of this organism. The phages belonging to one serological group have been 
found to be capable of a remarkable adaptability to a number of types of typhoid 
V strains, thus revealing an unsuspecting heterogenity of strains of this organism. 
Methods of specifically adapting this kind of phage to different types of B. typhosus 
have been elaborated. The phages thus specifically adapted have, in turn, been used 
to differentiate strains of B. typhosus recovered from cases and carriers. Correlation 
of the findings with epidemiological information has so far indicated that the differ- 
ences found are significant, and that the determination of strains represents a definite 
advance in the epidemiological investigation of outbreaks of typhoid fever. This 
study of V phages has also been prosecuted with special attention to a very different 
field, namely, that which concerns the phenomenon of adaptation and variation in 
bacteriophage and viruses. In the case of viruses, the value of vaccination in the 
prevention of smallpox and of more recently introduced methods of inducing 
immunity to other virus infections depends on such changes in the cell infinites and 
behaviour of these viruses. 

Dr. Defries has continued the study of rabies virus, particularly the develop- 
ment of satisfactory methods of assaying the protective value of anti-rabic vaccines. 
It is now possible to determine the relative protective values of various vaccines 
bv the inoculations of white mice. At the request of the Government of Trinidad, 
a suitable protective rabies vaccine for cattle has been prepared and furnished in 
considerable quantities. The preparation of this material has required the develop- 
ment of special methods. It is gratifying to learn that the vaccine has been found 
highly effective in controlling the outbreak of rabies. 

The Laboratories have the pleasure of having Dr. C. H. Yen of Union Medical 
College, Peiping, China, participate in the researches in filterable viruses. Dr. Yen 
has had wide experience in the conduct of research and will be responsible on his 
return to China for the initiation of studies of virus diseases in that institution. 
The selection of Toronto for an extended period of post-graduate study of virus 
diseases by Dr. Yen is a tribute to the outstanding work in this field by Dr. James 
Craigie, under whose immediate direction Dr. Yen has been working. 

Two interesting epidemiological investigations were conducted by Dr. Kenneth 
Brandon, namely, a study of an outbreak of erythema nodosum in a boys' school 
and of an extensive outbreak of measles in Toronto. In co-operation with Dr. M. H. 
Brown, Dr. Brandon continued his studies of the classification of Salmonella With 
Dr. D. T. Eraser, Dr. Brandon conducted a study of Schick test materials as supplied 
by various manufacturers and also an investigation of a group of children who 
received three doses of diphtheria toxoid. 

A number of the statistical studies which have been in progress in the depart- 
ment have been completed during the year. The survey of deaths from diabetes 
occurring in the Province of Ontario, conducted by Dr. Defries, Dr. A. H. Sellers 
and Dr. Mary A. Ross, was completed and the findings will shortly be published. 
Dr. Ross investigated the mortality data relating to appendicitis and presented the 
findings at a recent scientific meeting. Dr. N. E. McKinnon and Dr. Ross have con- 
tinued their study of the cardiovascular-renal group of deaths and also their study 
of the efficacy of diphtheria toxoid immunisation in the City of Toronto. Through 
the co-operation of Dr. J. E. Laxton, epidemiologist. Department of Public Health, 
Toronto, all cases of diphtheria which have been reported to the Department since 
1927 have been investigated and the details furnished to the Department. With these 
findings, a study of the cases of diphtheria which have occurred among children 
receiving three doses of toxoid has been made. Dr. Ross co-operated with Dr. Grant 
Eleming, McGill University, in a statistical study of the data obtained in Schick- 
testing a large group of children in Montreal. Dr. Sellers has investigated very fully 
the occurrence of foetal deaths in Ontario and has given attention to the preparation 



LNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 117 

of a classification of foetal mortality. He has also continued his study of death 
certification. The preparation of a suitable classification of the causes of morbidity 
for use in Canada has been a subject of study by Dr. Defries and Dr. Sellers in 
co-operation with the Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 

Section relating to Hormones, Vitamins, and other phsiological substances 

In this section of the Laboratories, Dr. Best, Miss Jessie Ridout and Dr. D. L. 
MacLean have continued their investigations of fat metabolism. It has been shown 
that the deposition of large amounts of fat in the liver definitely interferes with certain 
functions of this organ. Miss Ridout has made further progress in the studies of the 
effect of undernutrition on liver fat. With the co-operation of Dr. H. M. Barrett very 
interesting results have been obtained using fats "labelled" with the deuterium 
molecule. Mr. James Campbell has completed several aspects of the work on the 
substance in the anterior pituitary gland which causes a rapid increase in the fat 
content of the liver. 

In collaboration with Dr. Gordon Murray of the department of surgery the 
studies of the effect of purified heparin on human subjects and its action in the 
prevention of thrombosis in experimental animals, have advanced rapidly. A com- 
prehensive report of this work has recently appeared in the journal "Surgery." The 
purified heparin has been prepared by Dr. Arthur Charles. This material has now 
been administered postoperatively to some 130 human cases. It is hoped that a very 
large series of cases can be studied and that eventually a decision can be reached 
as to whether or not the results obtained on experimental animals are applicable 
to human subjects. Several further advances in this field have been made by Dr. 
MacLean, Mr. Campbell Cowan and Dr. Best, who have shown that the formation of 
white thrombi in certain experimental animals may be completelv prevented by 
heparin. Dr. Charles. Mr. Cowan and Dr. Best have reported on the effect of heparin 
administered by the subcutaneous route to several species of animals. 

Dr. D. A. Scott and Dr. Albert Fisher, whose work has made possible the use 
of a stable preparation of Protamine Zinc Insulin, have continued their most 
important studies in this field. The product elaborated in these Laboratories has 
been adopted by other manufacturers of insulin and it will probablv very soon be 
even more generally used. Dr. Scott and Dr. Fisher have detected substances acting 
like protamine in various tissues of the animal body. The distribution of Protamine 
Zinc Insulin by the Connaught Laboratories is increasing rapidly and this, in part, 
has been responsible for the decision of the acting directors of the Laboratories to 
recommend an extension of the insulin plant. It is hoped that this will provide 
better facilities for the work of Dr. Scott and Dr. Fisher as well as for that of the 
other investigators whose work is referred to below. 

Dr. E. W. McHenry and his collaborators have developed new methods for the 
purification of the anti-anaemic substance in liver. This has been facilitated by the 
excellent co-operation of Dr. R. Farquharson, Dr. J. A. Dauphinee and other mem- 
bers of the department of medicine, who have tested clinically a number of solutions. 
Miss E. G. Gavin has studied Jacobson's procedure for the assay of liver extract on 
g-uinea-pig"! Mr. D. W. Overend has conducted an analysis of an active liver fraction 
to identify the peptides of amino-acids present. Mr. E. J. Reedman has secured 
definite evidence of the presence of a protein-ascorbic acid complex in certain 
vegetable tissues. He has studied the effects of various dosages of ascorbic acid on 
the urinary excretion of that substance in human subjects. He has confirmed the 
finding of Szent-Gyorgyi with respect to the complementary action of vitamin P and 
ascorbic acid in the alleviation of scurvy in guinea-pigs. With Dr. C. E. Snelling of 
the Hospital for Sick Children. Mr. Reedman has studied the urinary excretion and 
the content of ascorbic acid in the blood of children consuming various diets. 

Dr. McHenry has collaborated with Mr. Melville Watson of the department of 
obstetrics and gynaecology in a study of the hormonal production of menstruation in 
monkeys. From the results an hypothesis has been advanced for the mechanism of 
menstruation in humans. In co-operation with Dr. A. A. Fletcher of the department 



118 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

of medicine, he has investigated the amount of pyruvic acid in human blood under 
various conditions. A study of the effect of vitamin Bi on the synthesis of fat from 
carbohydrate was begun and work was carried out with reference to the relation of 
vitamin Bi to the production of fatty livers. In co-operation with Dr. R. A. Cleg- 
horn of the department of medicine. Dr. McHenry has made measurements of the 
requirements of several species of mammals for adrenal cortical hormone. Dr. G. A, 
McVicar has studied the stability of adrenal cortical extract under various conditions. 
He has also found that oestrin is highly toxic for adrenalectomised dogs. 

Dr. Arthur Charles has developed a procedure by which a highly active heparin 
preparation may be obtained as a crystalline barium salt. This process has been 
adapted from an experimental stage to the processing of heparin from large lots of 
lung tissue. Further, this crystalline form produces no toxic effects when given to 
experimental animals or human subjects. This material has been supplied to the 
department of surgery for clinical investigation and is also available for general 
distribution. In addition, a less active heparin preparation has been made available 
for physiological purposes. 

Section of Industrial Hygiene 

Dr. H. M. Barrett has spent considerable time on studies on fat metabolism 
in collaboration with Dr. Best, Miss Ridout and Mr. Campbell, utilising deuterium- 
containing fats. The gravimetric method for the determination of deuterium 
developed late last year proved to be satisfactory. The work on the toxicity of 
trichlorethylene and carbon tetrachloride was continued with the assistance of Dr. 
MacLean who has been responsible for the histological work. Sufficient data are now 
available to warrant a report. Some studies of a material described by Forbes at the 
University of Virginia and stated by him to protect against liver necrosis are in 
progress. The data on atmospheric pollution in Toronto, which have accumulated 
during the past four years, are being prepared for publication. Studies on the 
toxicity of a bitumistic paint were undertaken at the suggestion of Dr. J. G. Cunning- 
ham. It was found to be a definite liver poison. Mr. K. K. Kay continued his studies 
on the transmision of ultra-violet energy by smoke. A new method for determining 
the transmission factor of a spectroradiometer was developed. Mr. Alexander Hands 
continued the study of trichlorethylene in the organism and succeeded in concen- 
trating the metabolite resulting from the inhaled substance. A number of attempts to 
isolate the material have as yet been unsuccessful. The interesting observation that 
tetrachlorethylene fails to yield a substance similar to that obtained from trichlorethy- 
lene opens up possibilities of explaining the different physiological action of the 
two materials. Studies on other saturated and unsaturated chlorinated hydrocarbons 
indicate the former class to be violent liver poisons while the latter are not. 

Dr. R. C. Partridge has continued experiments dealing with the effect on 
respiration of various nerves in the vagus trunk. Studies have been made to show 
how the influence of any one group of nerves is dependent upon the simultaneous 
action of other groups, as well as upon the tensions of O2 and CO2 in the respiratory 
centre. The radio amplifier has been used to identify the various fibres. Their 
action has been studied by noting the effects produced on respirations either by 
electrical stimulation of the fibres or by the elimination of their influence through 
cutting or cooling. The results obtained are of considerable significance and are 
in process of publication. 

An apparatus has been adopted for electrical stimulation in physiological work 
where the stimuli can be controlled accurately as to frequency, strength and duration 
and can be applied for each heart beat or during the period of distension or 
deflation of the lungs as desired. 

Dr. Partridge and Dr. MacLean have carried on further work dealing with 
ventilation in relation to public health. Investigations have been made of the 
sensation and physiological response of individuals to draughts. This problem has 
become important since the advent of modern methods of air conditioning. From 
these studies it was found that when conditions were maintained within the comfort 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1987 119 

zone, draughts with velocities up to 700 f.p.m. could be withstood without de- 
monstrable effects on blood pressure, heart rate, basal metabolic rate or body 
temperature, although skin temperature was decreased by draughts. The majority 
( 70 per cent. I of individuals w ere comfortable when the velocitv of the draught 
was less than 80 f.p.m. A new method of recording changes within the nostril was 
developed using a photronic cell. With this apparatus it was seen that changes occur 
in the nose with draughts on the face of 100 to 500 f.p.m. The level at which changes 
occur in the nose is that at which the draughts were found to be uncomfortable. 

Farm Section 

In the Farm Section of the Laboratories, of which Dr. H. E. McKinnon is the 
resident assistant director, the production of the various biological products, diph- 
theria, tetanus, scarlet fever, perfringens and staphylococcus antitoxins, anti- 
meningococcus and antipneumococcus sera, diphtheria toxoid, small pox vaccine and 
rabies vaccine, has. in the total, exceeded that of last year. At the same time the 
high potency per unit of nitrogen, the clarity and stability, have been fully maintain- 
ed. It will be appreciated that this is not merely "running a mill" at a faster rate. 
Standards of quality are raised as the years pass. Progressively high standards of 
finished products require continuous change in methods, in selection of sources, in 
immunisation and in concentration and refining procedures. Such changes cannot 
be made haphazard, but must be based on experimental investigation. The results 
of such investigation are often of a negative character, often lack the definite con- 
clusiveness that is desirable, and the change may prove not applicable to the problem 
of production among differing species of animals or in large-scale operations. Such 
investigation may merely suggest certain leads, the value of which can be determined 
only by the collection of data in the actual work of production over a long period. 
Thus, new factual information in this field is not quickly acquired. It comes 
slowlv and often when it is finally accepted it is so woven into the general routine 
that it is not recognised as a specific contribution. For instance, the diphtheria toxin 
now used in producing antitoxin and. of later years, toxoid, is a much more potent 
one than that of. say. twenty years ago. But. as is to be expected in the field of 
biological complexes, one would have great difficulty in definitely assessing the value 
of each of the various changes made in the production that have been responsible 
for this difference. 

It is with such problems or phases of problems that much of the work of the 
Farm Section is concerned. By way of illustration rather than review, brief mention 
may be made of some of this work. 

Dr. Donald Cameron has identified and controlled certain factors influencing 
toxin production and has studied the influence of season on the antitoxin response 
of guinea-pigs to diphtheria toxoid. 

Dr. Charles Siebenmann has continued his study of the influence and use of 
metallic silver in bacteriological work; of the relationship between globulin increase, 
as determined by his refractometric method, and antitoxin potency in horses under- 
going immunisation for production of tetanus antitoxin; of the influence of the 
inoculation of the antigen into the central nervous system o the subsequent antitoxin 
response; of methods for reducing labour and the number of guinea-pigs required 
in testing antitoxin: and. with Dr. Geoffrey Rake, he has studied the relationship of 
immune notrogen in antimeningococcus serum, as precipitated by the specific 
polysaccharide, to the antibody content as demonstrated by the mouse-mucin test. 

Dr. R. C. French has investigated new methods for fractionating antitoxic 
plasma and antisera, particularly antipneumococcus serum and has. with Dr. Rake, 
studied the relationship between the immune nitrogen combining with the specific 
pneumococcus polysoccharide and the protective antibody as shown by mouse- 
protection tests. 

Dr. R. D. Heard has made very significant findings concerning the extraction 
and character of gonadotropic hormones in human pregnancy urine and mares' 
pregnancy serum and of the oestrogens from mare's pregnancy urine and has isolated 
several hitherto undescribed compounds from these sources. 



120 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Dr. Geoflfrey Rake has studied the efficiency of various antigens in the produc- 
tion of anti-pneumococcus serum in horses and has established on a firm basis the 
mouse-mucin test which he introduced for the titration and standardisation of 
antimeningococcus serum. He has also investigated the value of a formalinised 
vaccine in the control of B. enteriditis infection in guinea-pigs. 

Dr. E. G. Kerslake has continued his study of the blood and urine of horses 
and of the antitoxin response of horses and humans to tetanus toxoid. Mr. K. C. 
Gunn was transferred to Dr. Best's division in November in order to prosecute 
exclusively the investigation of the mutation found in the rat colony as noted in 
last year's report. 

The mouse and rat colonies with a population of approximately 6,500 and 
2,500 respectively have carried through another year free from evidence of any 
pathogenic infection. There are no deaths in the colonies, apart from those due 
to old age. The advantages of using animals from such colonies for experimental 
work are obvious. The guinea-pig colony suffered severely in the heat of July 
1936, indicating the necessity for certain changes in the housing and caging. 
In the nine-month period over 29,000 animals were supplied from these colonies for 
use in experimental work and testing. A ferret colony has been started in order to 
supply animals required for research in influenza. 

During the year improvements have been made in stabling accommodation and, 
on account of dearth of water during July and August, 1936, a new well, capable 
of delivering over 300 gallons per minute, has been developed. 
Western Division, Connaught Laboratories 

In the second year of its establishment, the Western Division, Connaught 
Laboratories, has consolidated its position as a centre of bacteriological research 
in Western Canada, and has continued to work in close co-operation with the 
department of bacteriology and preventive medicine at the University of British 
Columbia, and with the Provincial Board of Health Laboratories. The staff has 
numbered five. Dr. C. E. Dolman, as research member of the Connaught Laboratories, 
has given one-third of his time to the work of the Western Division. The industry 
and loyalty of Dr. R. J. Gibbons as full-time research assistant has contributed 
largely to the success of the activities of the Western Division. 

Dr. Dolman has continued research on problems relating to staphylococcus 
toxins, toxoid and antitoxin. Further evidence confirming the specificity of the 
kitten test for the enterotoxin or food-poisoning substance produced by certain 
strains of staphylococci has been obtained. A search was made, in collaboration 
with Mr. R. J. Wilson, for an in vitro method of detecting food-poisoning strains 
of staphylococcus. Recent work, involving reciprocal absorption and flocculation 
methods, has given some promise of providing the desired in vitro method of 
differentiation. Interesting results have also been obtained bearing upon the chemical 
nature and antigenic relationships of the enterotoxin. 

Efforts have been made to prepare staphylococcus toxoids of lessened reaction- 
producing properties and promising results have been obtained. 

Dr. Gibbons has continued his studies on enteric infections, particularly those 
due to micro-organisms of the dysentery group. Samples of anti-dysentery Sonne 
serum have been prepared and assayed which, it is hoped, may shortly be tried out 
on patients. During the period under review, he has also commenced a programme 
of study of gonococcus. Conditions contributing to the successful isolation of the 
gonococcus in cases of suspected or residual gonococcal infection have been studied, 
and the relative efficiency of cultural methods and smear examinations in the detec- 
tion of infectivity have been investigated. Studies on the identification of gonococci 
by carbohydrate fermentation tests, and on serological methods of grouping strains of 
gonococci, are now in progress. 

In addition to many scientific reports, Dr. Dolman and his staff have given 
several lectures on the prevention of disease and kindred to lay audiences under 
the auspices of the University of British Columbia Extension Department, and 
independentlv to members of the Vancouver Board of Trade and similar organisations. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 121 

These lectures have afforded many opportunities of bringing to the attention of the 
public the importance of the research work being done at the Western Division. 

Every effort has been made to ensure that the work of the Western Division 
should supplement, rather than overlap, investigations in progress at headquarters 
in Toronto. Close relationships have been maintained between Toronto and Van- 
couver by correspondence and by annual visits. The anti-dysentery horse sera used 
by Dr. Gibbons in his work, and the staphylococcal antitoxins required by Dr. 
Dolman, were obtained through the courtesy of Dr. McKinnon and the staff of the 
Farm. Various strains of staphylococci have been interchanged for various purposes 
between Dr. Kitching and Dr. Dolman. Last winter, at a time when Vancouver was 
experiencing a severe epidemic of influenza, nasal washings were obtained from 
several patients bv Dr. Dolman (with the co-operation of Dr. K. F. Brandon, Health 
Unit Director under the Metropolitan Health Committee of Greater Vancouver I , and 
were sent by the former to Dr. R. Hare as a possible source of influenza virus. 

The policy has been continued of arranging joint fortnightly seminars, which 
were attended by the staff of the Western Division, the staff of the department of 
bacteriology and preventive medicine at the University of British Columbia, and the 
technical staff of the Provincial Board of Health Laboratories. The broadening of 
outlook on the significance of bacteriological research in relation to health and 
disease which has resulted from the presence of the Western Division at the University 
of British Columbia would be hard to over-estimate. This statement applies not only 
to the students in the departments of bacteriology and preventive medicine and of 
nursing, but in various ways to the University as a whole. It is significant that, 
whereas less than two years ago, at the time when the Western Division was first 
established. Dr. Dolman was informed by the President of the University that the 
Senate officially approved of only such research as related specifically to teaching, 
various departments are now openly and enthusiastically engaged in pure research 
problems. For the coming year, a small grant has even been obtained, out of 
University funds appropriated for this purpose, for the conduct of an investigation 
into the undulant fever problem in British Columbia by graduate students of the 
department of bacteriology and preventive medicine. This work will, of course, 
proceed with the close co-operation of the Western Division and of the Provincial 
Board of Health Laboratories, the latter of which has for some time been actively 
interested in a problem which is of such special local significance. The unsatisfactory 
nature of the regulations relating to the sale of milk in Vancouver has been repeatedly 
and vigorously brought to the attention of the Metropolitan Health Committee of 
Greater Vancouver by Dr. Dolman, who has been able to present authoritative 
evidence with detachment because of his associations with various organisations 
whose concern it is to accumulate information regarding the health hazards faced by 
the local community from continued failure to enforce pasteurisation of milk. 

The benefits resulting from the association between the Provincial Board of 
Health Laboratories and the Western Division of the Connaught Laboratories have 
been manifold. For instance, two or three apparent outbreaks of staphylococcal 
food-poisoning have occurred in the City of Vancouver in recent months. Suspected 
materials were naturally brought to the Provincial Laboratories, where preliminary 
tests were carried out. the investigation being then completed at the L^niversity. In 
this work, the enthusiastic assistance of Mr. R. J. Wilson has proved invaluable. Mr. 
Wilson has been working under a Banting Research Foundation grant on problems 
relating to staphylococcus enterotoxin, and results of great interest and importance 
have been obtained. Incidentally, this was the first instance of a Banting Research 
Foundation grant being awarded to a student in this university. It is hoped that the 
opportunities afforded, by present arrangements, of close co-operation with the 
Western Division of the Connaught Laboratories — the only centre in Western Canada 
devoted entirely to the prosecution of research in preventive medicine — may lead in 
lime to similar grants being made by the Banting Research Foundation in support of 
meritorious research projects, to be carried out by graduates of the department of 
bacteriology and preventive medicine at the University of British Columbia. 



122 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Again, in November, 1936, an outbreak of bacillary dysentery at Port Mellon, 
B.C., was reported to the Provincial Health Officer, who brought the matter to Dr. 
Dolman's attention. Dr. Gibbons was asked to investigate the outbreak. An 
epidemiological survey was made, and specimens were obtained for culture. The 
general and specific factors giving rise to the outbreak were thus determined, and 
the outbreak was quickly brought under control. 

As a result of Dr. Gibbons' investigation during the past year on the cultural 
method of diagnosis of gonococcal infection, this method was made available to the 
Division of Venereal Disease Control of the Provincial Board of Health by the 
Provincial Laboratories in Vancouver. This is an important example, among several 
which could be cited, of preliminary research conducted in the Western Division 
having led to the adoption of a routine laboratory procedure, thus helping to place 
the public health laboratory work of this province on a very high level. That the 
benefits gained from this kind of relationship are fully appreciated by the Govern- 
ment has been shown by several public utterances of the Provincial Secretary and 
Minister of Education. 

Incidentally the recent decision of the Government of British Columbia to place 
all the public health laboratory work of the Province under a Division of Laboratories 
of the Provincial Board of Health, with headquarters in Vancouver, will inevitably 
further enlarge the sphere of our potential activities, bringing the Western Division 
into touch with problems requiring epidemiological and bacteriological investigation 
in every section of the Province. 

Relationships with the medical profession and with public health officials remain 
close and cordial. Opportunities are frequent for acquainting practitioners and 
health officers with information relating to the proper use of biological products 
prepared by the Connaught Laboratories. Evidence of the esteem in which the 
Connaught Laboratories is held in Vancouver is furnished by the fact that Dr. 
Dolman has been elected a privileged member of the Vancouver Medical Association, 
and has been appointed consulting bacteriologist to the Vancouver General Hospital. 
Moreover, he is a member of the Technical Advisory Committee of the Metropolitan 
Health Committee of Greater Vancouver. 

The Western Division is gravely handicapped by lack of accommodation. Only 
one room approximately 24 feet square is available for its activities. There is no 
question but that greatly increased local prestige would accrue if larger and more 
suitable quarters were available. Moreover, expansion of activities in many ap- 
propriate directions would then become possible. The benefits accruing from the 
fact that the various organisations referred to in this report are under unified 
direction, would be greatly extended if it were possible for co-ordination of activities 
to proceed under one roof: so that, in the same building, teaching and research in 
preventive medicine could proceed in the closest conjunction with the public health 
laboratory work of the Province. 

The Library 

The librarian. Miss Olga Somerville, reports a further increase in attendance 
and loans for the year. Five hundred and thirty-six books were borrowed from 
libraries in Toronto and twelve from libraries outside the city. Volume VHI of 
the series of Collected Sutdies of the Connaught Laboratories was issued in March. 
Prior to last year, publication of the studies was made at intervals of several years. 
It is now felt that the number of papers contributed by the members of the labora- 
tories is such that annual publication is desirable. The present volume contains 
fifty-one articles, all of which appeared during the year 1936. These were reprinted 
from nineteen journals: seventeen from the Canadian Public Health Journal, six 
from the Journal of Physiology, etc. The studies are distributed to the leading scien- 
tific libraries throughout the world. 

The new products made available by the Laboratories during the year are: 
Protamine Zinc Insulin, pituitary extract (posterior lobe), pertussis vaccine (from 
freshlv isolated strains ) . and a solution of highly purified heparin. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 123 



The Laboratories have been visited, as usual, by scientists from many parts of 
the world. In addition to the numerous visitors from many points in Canada, the 
United States of America, and Great Britain, we have had guests from the following 
countries: Argentina. Brazil. Chile, China, Costa Rica, Denmark, Federated Malay 
States, France. Germany. Greece, Holland. Jamaica, Korea, Manchuria, Mexico, 
Newfoundland, Switzerland, and Uruguay. 

The acting directors wish to convey their sincere thanks to the members of the 
Connaught Laboratories Committee of the Board of Govenors for their kind reception 
of recommendations made during the year and to their colleagues in the Labora- 
tories for their co-operation and loyal support. 

(22) STATEMENT REGARDING THE MUSEUM OF ARCHAEOLOGY 
(Professor C. T. Currelly) 

During the past year, the singular good fortune that has attended the Museum 
from the start has remained with us. The increase in our collections has been very 
marked indeed. 

Our prehistoric collection has again been enriched by some extremely good 
Persian bronzes, both weapons and vases, from Luristan, together with one piece 
of the quite rare pottery. Two pieces of Hittite bronze sculpture and a seal were 
received, some extremely important examples of neolithic flint work from Poland, 
and a very large number of specimens from the British excavations in the caves of 
Palestine, presented by the British School of Archaeology in Jerusalem. 

An object of the greatest importance to us was obtained in the form of one of 
the glazed brick lions erected by Nebuchadnezzar between the palace gate and the 
outer gate of Babylon. This is a perfectly glorious piece of workmanship and was 
excavated by the German expedition that was at Babylon between 1899 and 1917. 
It is one of the most important things that has ever entered the Museum, and I hope 
may lead to a new industry in Canada. 

Another object of international importance was obtained in the form of a 13th 
century painted stone Madonna and Child, in marvellous preservation and of a very 
great beauty. It is of Spanish origin and was at one time in the cathedral of 
Salamanca. 

In general metalwork. the largest additions have been to the silver and Sheffield 
plate collections, the outstanding pieces being an 18th century Irish so-called potato- 
ring of exquisite workmanship, a fine posset cup made in 1698, and a French-Can- 
adian monstrance by Laurent Amiot. In the department of arms and armour, a very 
dramatic acquisition was made, to be published later. 

In general ceramics, the additions were few, a certain amount of English 
porcelain and a few figures being all that were obtained. In glass, however, we 
have been singularly successful. Owing to an extraordinary accident, a very large 
collection of the finest Irish glass, dating about the beginning of the 19th century, 
has come to the Museum. This is a collection that I really never expected we should 
be able to obtain, and illustrates the brilliant work of the glassmakers at that period. 
We also obtained a very good collection of English wine glasses, mainly of the 18th 
and early 19th centuries. 

In textiles, the chief addition was a beautiful series of early printed Persian 
cottons. Several handsome dresses of the late loth and early 19th centuries were 
received, four from Mrs. Clarence Webster of Shediac, one from Mrs. S. B. Chadsey, 
and a Belgian lace dress of extraordinary beauty and importance from Mrs. F. N. G. 
Starr. 

In the department of printing and the book, our main additions have been a 
very large number of postage stamps, Mr. Paul Hahn again being our most generous 
donor. 

Again the most notable growth has been made on the East Asiatic side. Two 
paintings that I think I can safely say are among the great pictures of the world. 



124 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

have been obtained and are now on the walls. They are frescoes painted in the 
14th century on opposite walls of a great monastery in China. They were in an 
extremely good state of preservation and have now been removed from their back- 
ground and mounted on canvas. A number of very strange masks in mother-of-pearl 
and marble, of a very early period, were obtained from China; also a collection of 
Shang dynastv carved bones, many pieces being inlaid in turquoise; an apple-green 
porcelain vase; a few fine bronzes; a hard stone image of a water-buffalo, a marvel 
of carving; and a large number of smaller objects, making up a series of Chinese 
material of very great importance. Mrs. W. J. Hanna, who for several years has 
contributed annually towards the Chinese collection, very generously made a donation 
sufficient to cover the cost of a collection of beautiful rock-crystal vases and figures 
of the 18th and 19th centuries. 

On the Japanese side, we obtaned two painted screens decorated with the 
famous flower-cart; these, together with the pair in Boston, were made for a Japanese 
noble family about 1600. Certain pieces of metalwork, including some very fine 
swords dating from the 11th century down, were obtained through the Reuben 
\*i'ells Leonard Bequest. In Japanese ceramics, a collection of thirty-seven tea-jars. 
17th to 19th centuries, was obtained. 

Just at the end of the year we received a piece of Indian Buddhistic sculpture of 
about the 10th century. It is in very hard stone and a characteristic piece of the period. 

In the department of ethnology and American archaeology, we have had one of 
our greatest accessions — three thousand pieces of the most beautiful neolithic 
implements that I have ever seen in America. These were found as a result of the 
dust storms in Saskatchewan. They are made largely of semi-precious stones that 
do not occur within many hundreds of miles of the area in which the implements 
were found, but seem to belong to the Lower Columbia River valley: chalcedony, 
jasper, agate, obsidian, and some very beautiful semi-translucent flint. The patination 
shows that some are thousands of years old, and the workmanship is of the choicest 
tvpe vet known in America. An important collection came from Miss A. C. McA, 
Munro of India, an African collection from Angola was obtained through Mr. R. L. 
Wilson, and our customary steady stream of general objects from the Arctic to 
South Africa continued. 

The work of the catalogue has gone on as usual. The case-making progressed 
steadily and a good deal of time was spent in making a very large number of mounts. 
The rearrangement of the ethnological galleries was continued, a great mass of 
Mexican material being put into shape. Good progress was made in the label-print- 
ing. The teaching has gone on with such an increase in numbers that on one occasion 
I noticed that nineteen classes had taken place in the Museum at the same hour. 
The attendance of out-of-town schools and other groups is developing at a greater 
rate than we have the facilities for handling. Thanks to Dr. Sigmund Samuel, Sir 
Robert Mond. and the Provincial Government, an addition to the building is at present 
under way, which will house the great Chinese library and give more office space. 
Certain loan exhibits have been sent out and local exhibitions held in the Museum. 
The rapidly increasing use of the Museum is throwing a heavier and heavier burden 
on the staff^. 

(23) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

OF ZOOLOGY 

(Professor J. R. Dymond) 

Additions to the gallery exhibits prepared under the Reuben Wells Leonard 
bequest included a female pronghorn antelope and head of male antelope, black 
and white phases of the timber wolf, barren ground caribou, mule deer and coast 
black tail deer. To accommodate these large mammals and new type exhibits recently 
undertaken, some additional cases have been constructed. 

The study collections have been augmented, largely as a result of field work 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 125 

and donations. A small amount of material has been purchased and some exchanges 
with other museums arranged. The number of specimens of the more important 
groups added during the year were as follows: 

Mammals 1,116 

Birds 2,129 

Reptiles 147 

Amphibians 301 

Fish 286 lots 

Molluscs 765 lots 

Insects 2,354 

Miscellaneous 957 

Accessions to the library totalled 107 bound volumes and 2.522 unbound publications. 

Among the more important donations were: 

Canadian Pacific Railway Co. Mounted specimen of record maskinonge. 
Deeks. Douglas B. 16 birds. 11 mammals, and 4000 feet motion-picture film. 
Fletcher, J. F. S. 63 mammals, 229 birds, 15 nests, 60 eggs, 17 amphibians. 10 

fishes, 30 lepidoptera. 13 lots of molluscs, 8 lots of crustaceans, 8 lots of 

other invertebrates. 
Hahn, Paul. 3 passenger pigeons. 
Marsh, Rev. D. B. 1 Barren Ground Caribou, 20 mammals. 3 birds, 4 lots of 

insects, 9 lots of other invertebrates. 
Proctor, Mrs. Carol. 1 passenger pigeon. 
Sparkes, R. P. Champion bulldog 'Bunjie'. 

Stevenson. J. A. A large collection of fishes and other marine material. 
Toronto Parks Dept. 23 mammals, 16 birds, including Zebra. Antelope, Tas- 

manian Devil. Wallaby, two-toed sloth, yak, penguin, flamingo and peacock. 
Walker. Dr. E. M. Complete set of 27 volumes (1857-1916) of the "Canadian 

Naturalist and Geologist"; 26 shells. 
Winnett, Dr. F. Painting of two female passenger pigeons and a killdeer, 

painted in Ontario in 1834 by H. N. S. Shrapnel. 

Donations were also received from the following: V. C. Acheson. Dr. A. E. 
Allin. Mr. Armstrons. H. Arnold. D. Augustine. E. Bailev. N. L. T. Baillie. Miss H. 
Bain, Prof. E. W. Banting. H. Barnett. T. Barnett, R. Barr. A. E. Bastedo, L. H. 
Beamer. G. Beare, H. Bell. H. P. Bingham. Biological Board of Canada. R. D. Black, 
Dr. H. M. Bowen. L. S. Bovd, C. G. Brennand, J. F. Brimley. Major Allan Brooks. 
R. C. Brooman. H. H. Brown, A. Buchanan. G. E. Bucher. E. R. Buckell, F. Butters. 
K. Carson, H. Cavalier. D. Chittv. C. S. Clapp, Dr. C. H. D. Clarke, G. Clark, Dr. 
F. A. Clarkson, R. R. Cockburn, Miss T. M. Cope, M. S. Corbin. C. E. Corfe, Dr. A. 
Cosens, Prof. A. F. Coventry, R. Crewe, W. V. Crich, S. Griddle, J. Crofts, M. W. 
Curtis. E. Davidson. Dr. V. Davidson, Mrs. M. Dawson, Col. L. S. Dear. Miss de St. 
Remy. 0. E. Devitt, J. G. W. Dillin, K. H. Doan, G. E. Doran, C. Duckworth, C. W. 
Dunn, Miss Edminson, J. Edmonds, Mrs. Edmonds, H. Ellis. F. H. Emery. T. \'V . 
Fairlie, F. Farlev, Prof. J. B. Ferguson, R. G. Ferguson, Dr. W. F. Ferrier, J. A. 
Fisher, A. M. Fitzgerald, J. H. Flemming, J. W. Forbes, W. Foxcroft. C. H. Franklin, 
K. Freeman. C. Frick. A. Gatto, R. J. Gill, H. K. Gordon. Mrs. W. Gordon, E. Grant. 
Mrs. A. B. Green. Miss T. Green, J. L. Grew, Wm. Gunn, Dr. S. Hadwen, W. Hahn. 
H. M. Hallidav. Mrs. H. M. Halliday, Mrs. C. G. Harbour, Miss F. Harkness. Prof. 
W. J. K. Harkness. J. L. Harper, Dr. P. Harrington. Dr. J. L. Hart. Mrs. R. D. Hebb, 
C. M. Heddle. A. Helmslev, V. Henderson. Rev. H. B. Herrington, W. H. B. Hoare. 
R. E. S. Homans. C. E. Hope, J. Howard. E. R. Hunter, Dr. W. E. Hurlburt. Dr. F. P. 
Ide, H. R. Ivor. R. Jeffries, J. H. Jennings, Mrs. M. Jewellett, S. D. Jinks. R. B. John- 
ston, J. L. Jorgensen. A. Kay, A. E. Kay, Charles E. Kav, H. C. Keenan. W. Kennedv. 
B. Kirbv. Mrs. M. R. Kuhns, Mrs. A. H. Land. M. Landon, Chief Justice F. R. Latch- 
ford, A. H. Lawrie, G. M. Laycock. Dr. A. H. Leim. W. J. LeRav. Miss 1. Limbert. G. 



126 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Lindblatt, R. V. Lindsay, Mrs. M. Lishman, Dr. H. W. B. Locke, W. Longhurst, A. 
Lucas, G. W. Lucas, R. Lunn, W. H. Lunn, L. Mably, Rev. E. J. MacDonald, Miss B. 
MacLean-Howard, Dr. D. A. MacLulich, J. Maffei, W. Mansell, J. May, Prof. T. F. Mc- 
Ilwraith, Dr. W. G. MacCallum, C. Mclnnis, H. V. Mclntyre, Dr. J. McKay, C. A. Mc- 
Kenna, Dr. J. N. McKinley, J. C. Medcof. M. Merton. Mrs. L. Middleton, J. J. Miller, 
R. B. Miller, Miss M. S. Milne, J. Miner, Miss M. Mitchell, J. E. Moore, R. Morris, F. 
Morton, F. Mo\^at. Mrs. A. Mulock, A. R. Muma. R. Munn, Miss A. Munro, J. A. 
Munro, D. Murphy, National Parks of Canada, A. W. H. Needier, G. Nelson, H. C. 
Nunn, K. O'Brien, Miss R. O'Grady, Ontario Dept. of Game and Fisheries, R. H. 
Ozburn, Prof. M. A. Parker, Miss L. J. Payne, H. Pickering, P. Priestley, A. L. 
Pritchard, B. Proctor, N. W. Radforth, Mr. Rainbow, Dr. D. S. Rawson, Miss E. J. 
Reynolds, K. Reynolds, H. Richardson, Dr. W. E. Ricker, E. V. Rippon, C. Robb, 
W. H. Robb, Miss D. Robbins, W. W. Robbins, E. Robertson, J. B. Robinson, W. 
Robinson. J. A. Rodd, H. M. Rogers, J. Ronayne, C. E. Roos, F. L. Rowlinson, 
Royal Ontario Museum of Archaeology, P. S. Rubins, F. Rutherford. Mr. Sager, 
Prof. P. Sandiford, Dr. W. E. Saunders, D. M. Scott, Dr. E. Seaborn, R. W. Sheppard, 
J. Shortreed, H. F. Skey, W. R. Skey, B. Smale, Miss M. Smith, H. H. Southam, 
Dr. H. M. Speechley, J. M. Speirs, R. M. Speirs, J. Spillet, W. B. Stallworthy, Dr. 
D. A. Stewart, G. Stewart, Mrs. K. Stilwell, J. Sutton. H. W. Swaine, Miss S. Taylor, 
S. L. Thompson, Dr. A. Thomson, C. Thomson, G. C. Toner, Dr. A. Topping, Toronto 
Humane Society, H. H. Townson, H. Trefzegar, W. A. Trickey, H. S. Troyer, Uni- 
versity of Michigan, R. D. Ussher, H. Wallace, S. Waller, F. W. Warwick, F. 
Watson, W. Watson, R. V. Wlielan, H. C. White, Mrs. A. R. Whittemore, G. V. Wilby, 
Prof. M. Y. Williams, A. A. Wilson, Const. F. L. Wilson, H. Wise, A. A. Wood, Miss, 
G. Workman, R. Wright, Zoologisk Museum. 

The arrears of cataloguing which have faced the museum ever since we moved 
into the new building are being gradually overtaken, although some divisions are 
farther behind than others and it will require several years to get the scientific 
collections properly catalogued and arranged. 

The co-operation of several hundred correspondents throughout the province 
should also be acknowledged. These persons report regularly to the Museum on 
changes in the numbers of various animals in their localities. Such records are 
expected to be of great value in the future in the study of periodic fluctuations and 
other phenomena connected with animal populations under natural conditions. 

The taxonomic and faunistic studies mentioned in the previous report have been 
continued and in some cases enlarged. 

The educational and extension work of the Museum is increasing rapidly. These 
activities include instruction of classes and other organised groups in the gallery, 
open evenings, lectures both in the Museum and outside, publication of handbooks, 
leaflets, etc., and assistance to naturalists' and sportsmen's organisations. 

(24) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

OF GEOLOGY 

(Professor E. S. Moore) 

During the past year an important step was taken in the appointment, for the 
first time, of an assistant director. Dr. J. Satterly, lecturer in geology was appointed 
to this position and he has given valuable assistance in the work of the Museum. 
Two lectures were given by the staff in the Tuesday afternoon series in Science: The 
Story of Nickel by the director and The Economic Importance of the Mineral 
Deposits of Southern Ontario by the assistant director. 

The following donations were received: 
Concretion from Englehart, Ont. by J. Jackson. 
Gold Ore from Kerr-Addison mine. Larder Lake, Ont. 

Chamberlin and Salisbury's Geology, Vols. I, II, and III, for the Library, by 
Professor A. L. Parsons. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 127 

Concretions from Lake Piedmont. Quebec by Dr. J. Satterly. 

Purchases: Concretions from California. 

Gold ore; an unusually rich specimen from the Parkhill mine, Ontario. 

Copper ore; a large slab of native copper found on Trans-Canada highway near 
Point Mamainse, Lake Superior. 

Gold ore from the O'Brien-Cadillac mine, Quebec. 

Wernerite from Madagascar. 

Enargite from Cerro de Pasco, Peru. 

A quantity of sodalite from the Princess quarry, Bancroft, Ontario. 

Zinc ore ( Descloizite ) from Uitsab, S. W. Africa. 

The relief model of the Sudbury nickel field, made by Miss Ruth Sutton under 
the direction of the staff, has been completed and a section model of this remarkable 
area has also been made and installed in the gallery. A geological relief model 
of the Toronto region is now being prepared since such models add greatly to the 
interest of the public in the Museum and they are of great educational value. 

Collections during the year consisted of gneiss from Haliburton County, 
phlogopite from Frontenac County and gold ore and associated rocks from Cordova 
Mines, Ontario, by the director. 

(25) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

OF MINERALOGY 

[Director, Dr. T. L. Walker) 

By A. L. Parsons 

In the year under review the Museum was extremely unfortunate in the illness 
of the Director which has prevented him from undertaking any active work. 

Professor A. L. Parsons, assistant director, was able to make a collecting trip 
in Frontenac, Renfrew and Hastings counties, Ontario, for a period of about two 
weeks in the month of July, securing some large and striking specimens which have 
been put on display in the gallery, and a large quantity of material to be used in 
research and in our exchanges with other institutions. 

In addition, the collections have been further enriched bv purchase, exchange 
and donations by friends. Further additions of fine specimens of gemstones have 
been made from money provided by the bequest of the late Reuben Wells Leonard, 
Esq. The collection now contains specimens of most of the gemstones and is one 
of the most popular exhibitions in the gallery. 

The automatic balopticon with its series of pictures relating to the mineral 
industry continues to be an attraction to young and old alike. The exhibit of 
fluorescent minerals is a never-failing attraction where thousands can see the diff^erent 
effect of ordinary light and ultra-violet light in producing colour in certain minerals. 
An ever increasing number of students are making use of the systematic collections 
of minerals and rocks and the paragenetic collections, with most gratifying results. 

During the past year several special excursions of school children from other 
centres in Ontario have come to the museum on Saturdays. This involves extra 
work bv members of the staff of the museum to give instruction to groups in the 
gallery. Arrangements are being made to continue this extremely important phase 
of the museum's work during the coming year, which may possibly involve the 
employment of assistants for the work. 

The work of the past twenty-five years has augmented a good University 
collection of minerals until now the Museum has not only one of the finest gallery 
displays in America but also a collection which in point of completeness is excelled 
by very few museums in the world. This Museum has been a pioneer in the extensive 
use of the descriptive label with large specimens and special series so as to point 
out to the visitors important features that are illustrated. This type of label has 
received much favourable comment from representatives of similar institutions who 
feel that to be of the greatest good to the public a museum should consist of a fine 



128 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

series of descriptive labels suitably illustrated by good specimens, ratber than a 
series of specimens with names and localities only. 

As was to be expected, the work of the Museum during the past year has 
suffered because of the absence of the Director. The routine work has been well 
carried on bv the two paid non-scientific assistants, but with the additional University 
work that had to be undertaken by the assistant director and the part-time scientific 
assistant, there was little opportunity to undertake important investigations more 
particularlv of new material. It is hoped that this phase of the Museum's work may 
be carried on during the coming year with results that may be of value to the 
mineral industry. 



(26) STATEMENT REGARDING THE ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 
OF PALAEONTOLOGY 

(Dr. Madeleine A. Fritz) 

During the past year a number of interesting exhibits have been installed in the 
galleries among which may be noted: 

(a I A very fine specimen Glyptodon. an extinct armadillo-like mammal from 
the Pleistocene of South America. 

( b I The head of a giant sloth. Megatherium ainericanum. also, from South 

America. 
( c ) A complete skeleton of Equus occidentalis, the Pleistocene horse. 
I (/ 1 A case illustrating "how dinosaurs are collected and prepared". 
( e I Two cases showing several very large ammonites from the Cretaceous rocks 

of Alberta along with a painting representing the general sea life of that 

geological period. 
(/) A restoration of a Carboniferous sea bottom in which the characteristic life 

is illustrated by a series of wax models. 

Besides the above mentioned exhibits a large coloured chart representing the 
development of animal and plant life throughout the ages has been placed in the 
south gallery. 

The vertebrate preparators have well under way a Pleistocene mammal group 
from California in which the sabre tooth tiger figures prominently. Considerable 
work has also been done on the skeleton of the horned dinosaur Styracosauras and 
on the skull of the carnivorous dinosaur Gorgosaurus. 

In invertebrate palaeontology during the past year the late director. Dr. W. A. 
Parks, continued h's work on the Devonian stromatoporoids. For the past twenty-five 
years, Dr. Parks had interested himself in this group of fossils. In this, his last 
work, he was hoping to bring to a conclusion what would have been a monographic 
study on this unique group of Palaeozoic animals. 

In connection with thq Museum's general educational program members of the 
palaeontological staff have taken care of over forty lectures to children from out-of- 
town schools, in addition to two Saturday morning lectures to groups of over five 
hundred Toronto children. 

In the series of popular public lectures offered by the committee of directors 
the museum of palaeontology contributed two. 

The Museum has installed this spring in the Library at Kitchener a palaeonto- 
logical exhibit dealing with the development of plant and animal life throughout 
the ages. This exhibit is one of a series of travelling exhibits that the various 
departments in the Museum propose to send out to local centres in order that a 
greater number of people in Ontario may be brought in touch with the work being 
done bv this institution. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 129 

The following list indicates the chief acquisitions to the Museum during the 
past year: 

By donation 

2 teeth of woolly mammoth — Mr. H. Anderson and Mr. F. Parnell. St. Davids, 

Ontario. 
Silurian coral — Mr. J. F. Davidson. Upper Canada College, Toronto. 
Large collection of Devonian fossils: also, collection of Cretaceous fossils from 

Alberta — Dr. W. S. Dyer. O'Brien Gold Mines, Toronto. 
Isotelus maxinius. a large trilobite — Mr. O. Lawrence, 29 Hillside Ave.. Toronto. 
Ostracode specimens^Dr. M. G. Kay, Columbia University, New^ York. 
Collection of Eocene pelecypods — Mr. J. Oughton, Royal Ontario Museum of 

Zoology, Toronto. 
Specimen of fossil coral — Mr. R. V. Whelan. Smoky Falls. Ontario. 
Cephalopod in black marble — Mr. H. G. Brooks, Toronto, Ontario. 

By purchase 

Set of Devonian fossils from Eureka district. Nevada; set of Cambrian fossils 

from Nevada — Percy Train. M. E.. Lower Rochester, Nevada. 
Large set of invertebrate fossils from Western Canada — Mr. D. J. McKillop, 

Regina. Saskatchewan. 
Skull and jaws of fossil rhinoceras, Teleoceras fossiger — Mr. G. F. Sternberg, 

Hays. Kansas. 
Fine set of crinoid specimens — Mr. H. L. Strimple, Lower Rochester, Nevada. 

(27) STATEMENT REGARDING THE EDUCATIONAL WORK OF THE 
ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

(Helen Reynar, Secretary-Treasurer ) 

Several new features have been introduced into the educational programme of 
the Museum during the past year with a view to extending its usefulness more 
widely throughout the Province. 

A plan was devised by Miss Ruth M. Home, M.A., the museum lecturer, whereby 
out-of-town schools may arrange for a day's visit to the Museum. This has been 
made possible through the cooperation of railway and bus companv officials, who 
give special rates, and of the museum directors and their assistants, who plan a 
series of gallery talks on the museum collections. In addition to the programme 
of lectures, lunch is served in the tea-room and motion pictures are shown in the 
theatre. On these "Days' valuable assistance has been given bv members of the 
Boy Scouts Association who conduct the groups from one lecture to another. A 
total of 3,561 children from Kitchener. Brantford. Gait, Ingersoll. St. Catharines, 
Woodstock, and Hamilton have taken advantage of this plan to visit the Museum; 
also students from McMaster University, Hatfield Hall and Applebv School. 

A further attempt to bring the Museum to communities outside of Toronto 
was the preparation of three sets of "Travelling Exhibits"', two from the museum 
of archaeology, and one from palaeontology. Arrangements were made with the 
Public Libraries of Kitchener and Gait to have these exhibits installed in rotation. 
Public lectures were given in these places by Dr. C. T. Currelly and Dr. Madeleine 
Fritz on the collections from their respective galleries. Plans for the extension of 
this scheme are under consideration for the coming year. 

Twelve illustrated lectures on Museum subjects were arranged for school 
children on Saturday mornings, with an average attendance each week of 700. These 
programmes will be continued for a second season. 

A very successful innovation was the arrangement by which the Museum 
was opened, one floor a night, on six Wednesday evenings during the winter, to 
provide an opportunitv for groups of business and professional men and women to 
visit the Museum. Among the many groups availing themselves of this service were 



130 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

the Kiwanis Club, the Young Men's Canadian Club, the York Bible Class, the Zonta 
Club, University Lodge, A. F. & A. M., the Toronto Field Naturalists' Club, and the 
Central Dental Association. 

Miss Home's pay lecture courses on interior design, pottery and porcelain, the 
modern home, and 18th century England were well attended. 

In addition to these special groups, Miss Home has lectured to hundreds of 
students from public and private schools, collegiate institutes, normal schools, and 
to many clubs and societies. 

Miss Lilian J. Payne, B.A., lecturer at the Museum under the Board of Education, 
has given instruction to 672 classes of fourth book pupils, totalling 25,480 during 
the school year. Four classes visit the Museum daily, according to a schedule made 
out by the Board of Education. 

Mr. F. A. Urquhart, B.A., a recent addition to the teaching staff, has given 
talks on zoological subjects to 4,621 persons during the year. He has also rendered 
valuable assistance with the Saturday morning programmes for children and with 
the Junior Field Naturalists' Club, which meets at the Museum on Saturday mornings 
under Mrs. A. R. Whittemore's direction. 

The directors and their assistants are in constant demand for lectures, in the 
Museum and elsewhere. The popular Tuesday five-o'clock lectures under the auspices 
of the Committee of Directors were held for the fourth consecutive season, the first 
seven on archaeological subjects, and the remaining ten on natural history. These 
lectures were well attended. 

A set of 180 postcards illustrating objects in the Museum has been prepared. 
These cards are sold at a comparatively low price and are being widely distributed 
to teachers of British history and literature. 

The total attendance for the year ending 30th June, 1937, was 289,428. 

(28) REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE DAVID DUNLAP 
OBSERVATORY 

{Professor R. K. Young) 

The David Dunlap Observatory was formally opened on May 31, 1935. The 
first report of the director covers the two year interval since that time. This splendid 
gift to the University of Toronto by Mrs. Jessie Donalda Dunlap as a memorial to 
her husband is dedicated to astronomical research and the diffusion of astronomical 
knowledge. The staff of the observatory is also the teaching staff in the department 
of astronomy at the University. 

The telescopic equipment consist of a 74-inch reflecting telescope with a silver 
on pyrex glass mirror and can be used either at the Newtonian focus or at the 
Cassegrain focus. At the former it is utilised for making direct pictures of the 
sky and at the latter is used in conjunction with a prism spectrograph to photograph 
the spectra of the stars. The telescope has functioned extremely well since its 
installation. There are however some difficulties which have manifested themselves 
with time. The chief of these have their origin in our extremely changeable climate. 
During a cold spell the telescope, which is very massive, takes the temperature of the 
surrounding air and when the temperature outside rises the telescope frequently 
becomes covered with condensation. We have partially met this difficulty by blowing 
warmed air around the mirror and its cell to keep it dry. Even so, moisture some- 
times collects on the mirror's surface. Condensation of moisture ruins a silver coat 
and necessitates frequent silvering of the large mirror. The best remedy for the 
difficulties arising from the changeable climate would be to have the mirror coated 
with aluminum. The apparatus and methods of doing this are now well known and 
it is to be hoped that funds can be found for installing the necessary apparatus. 

It has been the endeavor of the staff to utilise the telescope on every clear night 
from sunset to sunrise. During the session 1935-36 work was prosecuted on 192 
nights of which 110 were broken by clouds, the total number of working hours being 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 131 



1,096. During the session 1936-37 work was prosecuted on 198 nights of which 107 
were broken by clouds and the total number of working hours was 1.186. In the 
2,2S2 working hours, 2,064 photographs have been secured. The details of the 
various research programmes in which these plates were utilised appear elsewhere 
under research. 

A great need is felt at the observatory for subsidiary pieces of apparatus for the 
utilisation of all the data that is recorded on photographs taken with the telescope. 
We have made in the workshop a Hartmann microphotometer, a spectrum sensito- 
meter, two control clocks for the telescope and many minor pieces of apparatus. 
Plans are under way for the construction of a self-recording microphotometer. Our 
thanks are due to the department of physics for permission to use their recording 
microphotometer during the past two years. In order to purchase the subsidiary 
laboratory apparatus urgently needed we would require a capital appropriation of 
about 20,000 dollars. Until such time as funds can be found we are endeavoring to 
make in our workshops as many of the minor pieces as our equipment and time 
will permit. 

The library of the observatory, in charge of Miss E. M. Fuller, is an essential 
part of the research equipment. At present there are 3.089 bound volumes in the 
library. Of these 1,615 are on loan from the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada. 
A large fraction of the remainder was a gift from the director emeritus. Dr. Chant, 
to the observatory. Besides the bound volumes there is probably an equal amount 
of unbound material. 

The grounds and buildings of the institution are directly under the care and 
management of the superintendent of the University. Our thanks are due to them 
for the efficient manner in which they have taken care of the buildings and maintained 
the grounds within the limits of the resources available. It is eminently desirable 
that the grounds be planted out with some kind of trees and shrubs at as early a 
date as possible. 

From the time of the opening of the observatory we have had many requests 
by the public to be allowed to inspect the observatory and view objects through the 
telescope. In order to meet this interest we have allowed visitors access to the 
buildings on every afternoon, Sundays and holidays excepted, and have set apart 
Saturday evenings for viewing objects through the telescope. During the session 
1935-36 over 3,000 visitors attended these open evenings and in the session 1936-37 
about 2.500. A great number besides visited the institution in the afternoons. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 133 



APPENDIX B 

REPORT OF THE REGISTRAR 

(A.B.Fennell,Esq.,M.A.) 

I beg to submit the following statistics for the year ending June 30th, 1937: — 

(a) Distribution of the staff of the University and University College (furnished 
by the Bursar I . 

(6) Distribution of the staffs of the federated Arts Colleges (furnished by the 
Registrars of the colleges) . 

( c ) Registration of students by faculties and years. 

( d) Enrolment in the Arts Colleges ( furnished by the Registrars of the colleges) . 

(e) Enrolment in the university departments in Arts (furnished by the 
departments ) . 

(/) Registration in courses in the Faculty of Arts. 

(g) Registration in courses in the School of Graduate Studies (furnished by 
the Secretary of the School ) . 

{h) Results of annual examinations (furnished by the Secretaries of the 
faculties ) . 

H) Admission to degrees. 

(/") Admission to diplomas and certificates. 

(A-) Geographical distribution of students (furnished by the Secretaries of the 
faculties ) . 



134 REPORT OF THE No. 12 



(a) Distribution of the Staff of the University and University College: 






_«^ 



o S " ?i =■ - & 



University (Faculty of Arts ) 42 29 31 — 38 — — — 132 

University College 16o 7 7 — 11 — — — 4 

Faculty of Medicine 266 8 30 28 19c — — — 1896 

Faculty of Applied Science 14 11 10 — 21 — — — 45d 

Faculty of Household Science 2 — 2 — 5 — — — 8 

Ontario College of Education 8 3 4 — 21e — — 26 — 

Faculty of Forestry 2 2 1 — 1 — — — — 

Faculty of Music — — — — 4 — — — — 

Faculty of Dentistry 11 7 1/ 18 1/ — — — 7 

Social Science — 1 — — 15^ 16 1 — 1 



School of Nursing 



a 1 also in University 

b 1 also in Arts 

c 2 also in Dentistry 

d 1 also in University College 

e 2 also in University College; 1 also in Medicine and Dentistry 

/ 1 also in Medicine 

g 1 also in Arts; 1 also in Dentistry 

h 17 also in Medicine; 1 also in Dentistry; 1 also in Ontario College of Education 



(h) Distribution of the Staffs of the Federated Arts Colleges: 



Professors 

Associate professors 
Assistant professors 

Lecturers 

Instructors 

Fellows 

Readers 



Victoria 


Trinity 


St. Michaeil's 


College 


College 


College 


11 


10 


15 


6 


4 


9 


5 


. 


1 


9 


3 


16 


4 




9 


1 


2 




1 


2 


. , 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



135 



(c) Registration of Students by Faculties and Years: 

The number of students registered in the university, in colleges and faculties, 
in the session 1936-37 was 7,448, distributed as follows: 



Faculty of Arts 

University of Toronto 747 

University College 605 

Victoria College 462 

Trinity College 253 

St. Michael's College 234 

Registered twice 

Faculty of Medicine 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. 

Faculty of Household Science 

Ontario College of Education 

Faculty of Forestry 

Faculty of Music 

School of Graduate Studies 

Faculty of Dentistry 

Registered twice 



Men 
2,301 



Women 
1,851 



640 
481 
465 
136 
133 
4 



1.387 

1.086 

927 

389 

367 

4 



796 
786 

405 

33 

30 

464 

195 

36 



77 

3 

43 

293 

20 

173 

26 

12 



4.974 
In departments there were registered 688, distributed as follows: 
13 



2,474 



Department of Social Science 

School of Nursing 

University Extension (Occupational Therapy) 
University Extension ( Physiotherapy ) 



13 



675 



Total 
4,152 



873 
789 

43 
698 

33 

50 
637 
221 

48 



7,448 



80 


93 


509 


509 


45 


45 


41 


41 



688 



The grand total registration for the whole university was 8,136, of whom 4,987 
were men and 3,149 were women. 

In addition there were 6,435 persons registered in the Department of University 
Extension in courses and at provincial centres which are referred to in detail in 
Appendix A (14). 

The figures may be further analysed as follows: 



Faculty of Arts 

University of Toronto 

Teachers' Classes and Summer Session 

Occasional Arts students , 

University College 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 

Occasional students 

Victoria College 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduate 

Occasional students 



Men 
495 


Women 
606 
34 


Total 

1,101 

286 


252 






747 

Men 
184 


640 

Women 
164 
122 
131 

47 
17 


1,387 

Total 
348 


182 


304 


136 


267 


93 


140 


10 


27 






605 

Men 

162 


481 

Women 

152 

135 

126 

50 

2 


1,086 

Total 
314 


114 


249 


116 


242 


68 


118 


2 


4 







462 



465 



927 



136 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Trinity College 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 

Occasional students 



Men 
91 


Women 
44 
38 
37 
17 


Total 
135 


71 


109 


60 


97 


30 


47 


1 


1 







253 



136 



389 



St. MichaeFs College 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 

Occasional students 



Men 
78 


Women 

54 

39 

31 

5 

4 


Total 
132 


82 


121 


55 


86 


17 


22 


2 


6 







234 



133 



361 



Faculty of Medicine 

Men 

First year undergraduates 132 

Second year undergraduates 148 

Third year undergraduates 136 

Fourth year undergraduates 132 

Fifth year undergraduates 102 

Sixth year undergraduates 114 

Candidates for Degree of B.Sc. ( Med. I 4 

Candidates for Diploma in Public Health 17 

Candidates for Diploma in Psychiatry 3 

Graduate students 2 

Occasional students 6 



Women 


Total 


20 


152 


11 


159 


10 


146 


11 


143 


10 


112 


8 


122 


1 


5 




17 


1 


4 


5 


7 




6 



796 



77 



873 



Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 

Men 

First year undergraduates 282 

Second year undergraduates 204 

Third year undergraduates 154 

Fourth year undergraduates 135 

Fifth year undergraduates 11 

786 



Women 



en 


Total 




282 


1 


205 




154 


i 


136 


1 


12 



789 



Faculty of Household Science 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 

Fourth year undergraduates 



Men 



Women 


Total 


4 


4 


11 


11 


16 


16 


12 


12 



43 



43 



Students in attendance 

Extra-mural students 

Students in B. Paed. course. 
Registered twice 



Ontario College of Education 



Men 


Women 


Total 


138 


202 


340 


90 


72 


162 


184 


19 


203 


7 




7 



405 



293 



698 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



First year undergraduates... 
Second year undergraduates. 
Third year undergraduates . . 
Fourth year undergraduates . . 



Faculty of Forestry 



33 



137 



Men 


Women 


Total 


14 




14 


6 




6 


6 




6 


/ 




7 



33 



Faculty of Music 

First year undergraduates 

Second year undergraduates 

Third year undergraduates 



Men 

8 

10 

12 



30 



Women 
2 
12 
6 



20 



Total 
10 
22 
18 



50 



School of Graduate Studies 

Men 

Candidates for Degree of Ph.D 112 

Candidates for Degree of M.A 94 

Candidates for Degree of M.A.Sc 12 

Candidates for Degree of C.E 1 

Candidates for Degree of E.E 1 

Candidates for Degree of D.Paed 85 

Candidates for Degree of M.Sc. (Dent. I 1 

Candidates for Degree of M.S.A 19 

Candidates for Degree of D.V.Sc 2 

Graduate students 137 



imen 


Total 


22 


134 


46 


140 


1 


13 




1 




1 


7 


92 




1 




19 




2 


97 


234 



464 



173 



631 



Faculty of Dentistry 

Men 

First year undergraduates 38 

Second year undergraduates 42 

Third year undergraduates 35 

Fourth year undergraduates 26 

Fifth year undergraduates 51 

Candidates for Degree of B.Sc. (Dent.) 3 

Candidates for Diploma in Dental Nursing 



Women 


Total 


1 


39 




42 


i 


36 


1 


27 




51 




3 


23 


23 



195 



26 



221 



Department of University Extension 

B.A. Course 

Summer .Session : Men Women 

Regular students 209 314 

Occasional students 12 7 

Teachers' Classes: 

Toronto: 

Regular students 305 315 

Occasional students 11 8 

Fergus : 

Regular students 2 12 

Specialists' Courses 
Summer Session : 

Regular students 33 4 

Registered twice 77 54 





Grand 


Total 


Total 


523 




19 


542 


620 




19 





14 



37 
131 



6.53 



37 
131 



495 



606 



1.101 



1.101 



138 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Social Science 

Men 

First year full-time students 5 

Second year full-time students 5 

"Apprentice" students (second year) 2 

Part-time students 1 



13 



omen 


Total 


26 


31 


26 


31 


5 


7 


23 


24 



80 



93 



School of Nursing 



Full-t i me st udent s . 
Part-time students. 



Mf 



Women 


Total 


100 


100 


409 


409 



509 



509 



(d) Enrolment in the Arts Colleges 

di University College: 



O 



« c ii 
V c („ 

U O '^ 

OCCX 



O J 



Co ;r 
■" .22 c^ 









16 
1 



16 
6 



First Year — 

Pass 12 15 37 

Honour 6 18 9 

Second Year — 

Pass 9 11 15 

Honour 8 16 9 

Third Year — 

Pass 5 12 41 

General 

Honour 2 10 3 

Fourth Year — 

Pass 16 

General 

Honour 7 15 11 

Totals — 

Pass 

General 

Honour 

Teachers' Classes. . 
Graduate Studies . . . 
Other Facuhies .... 

Grand Total 61 103 148 68 



12 
8 



17 
3 



183 
42 



138 
30 



36 
17 



25 
17 



46 210 
35 



39 



12 102 14 

3 1 

3 30 14 



30 



15 



120 
30 



77 

2 

25 



1 
26 



16 
2 

31 



31 

10 
5 



95 



97 



58 84 



73 



26 


38 


109 


38 


41 


423 
3 


75 

1 


85 


407 
3 


115 


3\9 


23 


59 


32 


ii 


is 


132 


63 




116 


46 






6 








73 


2 




20 


12 




. 12 




7 


16 




72 


9 
255 




12 
175 







56 703 405 85 733 173 349 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 139 



( 2 > Victoria 


College: 






























0) 

O 


-J 


Greek and 

Roman 

History 


to 

2 2 

1 1 

1^ 3 


"3 >. 

OK 


"mi 

B 


5 
S 
a 

O 


c 

as 

S-. 




to 

IS 


CO 

3 
O . 

a> s 


First Year — 




























Pass 




. . 10 


9 




36 


6 


2 


1.38 


14 


49 


169 


21 


102 


Honour . . . . 




8 


19 




16 


1 


3 


34 


35 




50 






Second Year — 








Pass 




7 


4 
13 




19 
5 


7 


2 


114 
34 


11 
23 


30 


93 
39 


16 
10 


117 


Honour 




... 1 




Third Year — 




























Pass 




... 4 


11 




49 


1 


3 


84 


14 




62 


47 


114 


General . . . 










1 


















Honour . . . . 




... 8 


14 




7 






23 


17 




20 


io 




Fourth Year- 




























Pass 






i 




22 

2 












i 


14 


46 


General . . . 








Honour . . . . 




... 3 


9 




3 






32 


i2 




12 


9 




Totals- 


























Pass 




... 21 


24 




126 


14 


7 


336 


39 


79 


324 


98 


379 


General . . . 






1 




3 












1 






Honour ... 


5ses 


... 20 


55 




31 


i 


3 


123 


87 




121 


29 




Teachers' Cla: 














55 






13 






Graduate Stud 


lies 


... 2 


io 






3 


4 


15 


6 




6 


9 




Grand Total. 


... 43 


90 




160 


18 


14 


529 


132 


79 


465 


136 


379 



< 3 • Trinity College : 





V 

O 


08 


Creek and 

Roman 

History 


71 

u 
— tt 

n cs 

.11 

- 73 

C-J 


g2 
•C.2 

oac 


.22 

s 


O 


c 


s 


to 


CO 

3 
O . 

— o 

U S 


First Year — 


























Pass 


2 


7 




8 






59 


12 


12 


62 


4 


115 


Honour , 


4 


i 




15 






20 


3 




8 


18 




Second Year — 






Pass 


3 


3 






3 




33 


2 


8 


22 


12 


98 


Honour 


1 


2 




2 






15 


8 




13 


6 




Third Year — 


























Pass 


8 


6 




5 


5 




35 


8 




27 


15 


92 


General 














1 








1 






6 


9 




8 






9 






3 


1 




Fourth Year — 






Pass 












1 












40 


Honour 


3 


3 




3 






5 


i 




.3 


2 










Totals- 


























Pass 


13 


16 




13 


8 


1 


127 


22 


20 


111 


31 


345 


Genera] 














1 








1 






U 


21 




28 






49 


U 




27 


27 










Grand Total 


27 


37 




41 


8 


1 


177 


34 


20 


1.38 


59 


345 









140 REPORT OF THE No. 12 



( 4 1 St. Michael's College : 








_^ 
























z: 














o. 


9 






















o 


O . 




9i 


c 


£ s. 


L. 


C 


S 




:• 
S 


_o 


_o 


•5b » 
13 c 




'O 




coc: 


J- 


U 


c 


O- 


U. 


a 


a. 


OSUi 


First Year — 
























Pass 


7 


42 


10 




70 


/ 


4 


57 


28 


75 


84 




3 


13 


8 




13 


4 




16 


6 


8 




Second Year — 






Pass 


.. 2 


40 


5 




68 


8 




47 


39 


48 


9i 




1 


13 


4 




11 


4 




8 


IQ 


12 




Third Year- 






Pass 


.. 2 


35 


1 




40 


8 




36 


24 


32 


70 


Honour 


.. 1 


5 


1 




11 


2 




7 


10 


10 


•• 


Fourth Year — 
























Pa<s« 




4 






4 


i 




"e 


8 


8 


20 


Honour 


.. 2 




Totals — 
























Pass 


.. 11 


117 


16 




178 


23 


4 


140 


91 


155 


265 




. . 7 


35 


13 




39 


11 




37 


34 


38 










Teachers' Classes 




















14 


, , 


Graduate Studies 




















17 




Grand Total 


.. 18 


152 


29 




217 


34 


4 


177 


125 


224 


265 



(e) Enrolment in the University Departments in Arts: 

The following tables exhibit the numbers attending lectures in the university departments 
in the Faculty of Arts, together with the number of those taking the practical work in the 
laboratories: 

Department of Anthropology 



Pass and 
Pass Honour Honour 



Faculty of Arts — ^ ^ ^ 

First Year 214 .. 29 

Second Year ■ • 9 25 

Third Year 3 .. 14 

Fourth Year 24 . . 4 

School of Graduate Studies • • • • 15 

Department of Social Science — 

First Year •■ •• 20 



Totals 241 9 107 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



141 



Department of Applied Mathematics 



Pass 



Pass and 
Honour 



Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 8 

Second Year 1 . , 39 

Third Year 2 . . 22 

Fourth Year . . . . 23 

Occasional Students . . . , 2 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

Second Year . . 29 

Third Year . . 6 

School of Graduate Studies . . . . 22 

Totals 11 35 



108 



Department of Archaeology 



Lecture Courses 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students... 
School of Graduate Studies 

Totals . 



lor 


2 


or 


3 hours 


Pass 






Honour 


26 






18 
8 

17 
13 


2 








1 









29 



56 



Department of Astronomy 



Pass Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 11 .. n 

Second Year 14 .. 4 

Third Year 9 15 23 

Fourth Year . . 9 3 

Teachers" Classes 67 . . 67 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

Second Year 18 

School of Graduate Studies . . 1 1 

Department of University Extension — 

Evening Classes 21 

Totals 140 25 109 



142 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Biology 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 hours 



4 or 5 or 6 hours 



Pass Honour 



Pass Honour 



Laboratory 
Courses 



Pass Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 

Third Year 

Faculty of Household Science — 
First Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Dentistry — 

First Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

School of Nursing 

College of Optometry of Canada 

Totals 



80 
87 
53 


100 

85 

48 

4 

154 
21 

6 

14 

7 

38 


2 
3 


80 
87 

47 


100 
71 
25 

7 

154 
12 

6 

14 

7 

38 
48 


12 


46 




12 


46 


232 


523 


5 


226 


528 



Deoartment of Botany 





Lecture 
1 or 2 oi 


Courses 
3 hours 


- Laboratory Courses 




Pass 


Honour 


Pass 


Honour 


Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 


121 
14 
21 

48 
3 

5 
11 

104 
89 


103 

15 

2 

12 

38 
14 


15 
14 
21 

47 

65 

5 

11 

104 
89 


103 




15 


Third Year 


2 


Fourth Year 


12 






Occasional Students 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 
Ffrst Year 

Faculty of Household Science — 

First Year 

Second Year 


38 


Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 

Fourth Year 

School of Graduate Studies 


14 

7 

36 


Ontario College of Pharmacy — 

First Year 

Second Year 








Totals 


416 


184 


371 


997 






"■^ 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



143 



Department of Chemistry 



Pass 



Pass and 
Honour 



Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 183 

Second Year 65 

Third Year 31 

Fourth Year 2 

Teachers' Classes. Summer Session 35 

Occasional Students 2 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Household Science — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 15 

Second Year 6 

Faculty of Dentistry — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Ontario College of Pharmacy — 

First Year 104 

Second Year 88 

College of Optometry of Canada 21 

Totals 552 



155 
139 



83 

85 

120 

7 



4 
11 



39 
42 
36 

45 



148 


225 


100 


150 


23 


52 


21 


17 




35 


3 


5 




155 




139 




83 




85 




120 




7 



25 
4 

39 

42 
36 

29 



104 
88 



r66 



295 



1,434 



Department of Fine Art 



Pass 



Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 33 

Second Year 53 

Third Year 56 

Fourth Year 16 

Occasional Students 4 

Totals 162 



144 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Food Cliemistry 
(Faculty of Household Science) 



Faculty of Arts — 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Household Science 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

School of Graduate Studies. 
Totals 





Pass and 






Pass 


Honour 


Honour 


Laboratory 


19 






19 


15 






15 




2 


29 


31 


11 






11 


10 






10 






U 


12 






4 


4 



55 



45 



102 



Department of Geography 



Pass 



Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 79 101 

Second Year 20 

Teachers" Classes 47 

Ontario College of Education . . 250 

Totals 146 351 



180 
20 

47 

250 



497 



Department of Geology and Palaeontology 









Lecture Courses 




Laborator 
Courses 






1 or 2 or 
hours 


3 


4 or 5 or 6 
hours 


7 or more 
hours 


y 




Pass 


H( 


jnour 


Pass Honour 


Pass Honour 


Pass Honour 


Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 


. 118 

24 

. 20 

. 70 
. 49 

. 41 

6 
6 




65 

18 

3 

"i 

6 


'.'. 8 
7 

5 


2 
6 


i2 
14 

15 
31 
41 

6 


18 


Third Year 


8 


Fourth Year 

Occasional Students.... 

Faculty of Applied Science 
and Engineering — 


8 


Third Year 

Fourth Year 




Faculty of Forestry — 

Second Year 

Third Year 

School of Graduate 


IS 






Totals 


. 334 




93 


20 


8 


119 


49 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



145 



Department of History 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 
hours 



4 or 5 or 6 
hours 



Pass Honour 



Pass 



Honoi 



i or more 
hours 



Pass Hor 



Facuhy of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Teachers" Classes 

Occasional Students 

School of Graduate Studies 

Deoartment of University 

Extension Evening Classes 

Totals 47 





133 


144 






56 


30 


84 


98 
83 


8 

6 


3 
^-1 


31 




12 


8 


2 
40 


i 


3 


4 
16 


14 



195 



228 



213 



36 



Department of Household Science 
(Facultv of Household Science) 



Pass 



Pass and 
Honour 



Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Household Science- 
First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

School of Graduate Studies . . . . 
Totals 



12 
11 



4 
11 
15 
12 



31 



35 
38 
30 
29 



31 



132 



50 

41 

31 

1 



11 

15 
12 

4 
165 



Department of Italian and Spanish 



Italian 



Spanish 



Pas 



Honour 



Pass 



Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Totals 53 

Methods of Research. Bibliography — 6 



26 


8 


123 


43 


19 


8 


57 


27 


8 


a 


47 


3 




2 




7 




1 




5 



227 



85 



146 


REPORT OF THE 




No. 12 


Department of Law 






Pass 


Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

Third Year 50 

Faculty of Forestry — 

Third Year 6 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of University Extension — 

Evening Classes 114 

Bachelor of Laws Course 

Totals 170 



34 
33 
31 
20 
2 



12 



141 



Department of Mathematics 









Lecture 


Courses 






1 


or 2 or 3 
hours 


4 or 5 or 6 
hours 


7 or more 
hours 




Pass 


Honour 


Pass 


Honour 


Pass Honour 


Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 


50 
25 
30 

ii 

4 

268 
144 

15 
19 


50 
54 
46 
16 


20 


64 

61 

21 

8 

12 

7 

4 


46 
28 


Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Teachers' Classes 


5 
10 


Occasional Students 




Faculty of Applied Science and 
Engineering — 

First Year 

Second Year 




Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

College of Optometry of Canada. . 


5 


Totals 


566 


168 


20 


177 


94 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



147 



Department of Military Studies 



Pass 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Fifth Year 

Sixth Year 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering- 
First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Ontario College of Education 

School of Graduate Studies 

Ontario College of Pharmacy — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Totals 



19 
9 

19 
1 



21 

12 

3 

2 



108 



Department of Mineralogy and Petrography 



Pass 



Pass and 
Honour 



Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Occasional Students 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Faculty of Forestry — 

Second Year 

School of Graduate Studies 

Totals 24 



24 




24 




23 


23 




19 


10 


2 


7 


9 


2 




2 


180 




180 


55 




55 


35 




33 


3 




3 


6 




6 




13 


13 



283 



62 



358 



148 


REPORT OF THE 




No. 12 


Department of Philosophy 






Pass 


Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Y'ear 

Fourth Year 

Teachers' Classes 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of Social Sciencf 
First Year 

Totals. . . . 



87 


114 


116 


100 


226 


59 


42 


43 


21 






64 




19 



492 



399 



Department of Physics 



Pas 



Pass and 
Honour Honour Laboratory 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 158 

Second Year 46 

Third Year 53 

Fourth Year 

Candidates for Specialists' Certificates, Summer 
Session 

Faculty of Medicine — 

First Year 155 

Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering — 

First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Faculty of Household Science — 

First Year 

Candidates for Specialists' Certificate 

Faculty of Forestry — 

First Year 15 

Faculty of Dentistry — 

First Year . . 39 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of University Extension — 

Physiotherapy 23 

College of Optometry of Canada . . 47 

Totals 295 241 



86 


122 


31 


79 


36 


29 



15 



44 



155 



12 
8 
6 


12 
8 
6 


5 
4 


5 

4 



15 

39 
23 

47 



392 



768 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



149 



Department of Political Science 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 
hour? 



4 or 5 or 6 
hours 



/ or more 
hours 



Pass Honour Pass Honour Pass 



Honour 



Faculty of Arts — 

First Year 166 131 

Second Year 195 9 

Third Year 147 36 

Fourth Year 31 35 

Occasional Students 5 6 

Faculty of Household Science — 

Second Year 8 

Third Year 9 

Faculty of Forestry^ — 

Third Y ear 6 

School of Graduate Studies . . 3 

Totals 567 220 



64 



11 



75 



97 
70 

55 



227 



150 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Department of Psychology 



Lecture Courses 



1 or 2 or 3 
hours 



4 or 5 or 6 
hours 



7 or more 
hours 



Laboratory 
Courses 



Pass Honour Pass Honour Pass Honour Pass Honour 



Facuhy of Arts — 

First Year 203 

Second Year 120 

Third Year 114 

Fourth Year 50 

Teachers' Classes 144 

Teachers' Classes, 

Summer Session 216 

Occasional Students 5 

Facuhy of Medicine — 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Facuhy of Household Science — 

First Year 3 

Second Year 1 

Third Year 3 

School of Graduate Studies 

Department of Social Science — 

First Year 13 

Second Year 14 

School of Nursing 22 

Department of University Ex- 
tension — 

Occupational Therapy 41 

Physiotherapy 21 

Evening Classes 340 

Centralised Pupil Nurses. . . 225 

College of Optometry of 

Canada 20 

Totals 1,555 



54 

20 

14 

4 



136 
24 
24 



31 



15 


114 


28 


9 


18 


12 


2 


24 


2 



24 



12 



24 



34 



307 



18 



50 



156 



100 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



151 



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152 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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132 a: WW wC.: 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



153 



(h) Results of the Annual Examinations 
Faculty of Arts 

First Year 



Co. 



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t: - -c 



= L '-^ 


^ 


.E 


7. 


< 


3 


1 


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.. 163 


119 


54 


95 


431 


245 


100 


86 






60 


. . 85 


54 


27 


28 


194 


129 


64 


1 








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4 
1 

2 


3 


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6 


12 
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8 


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7 


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6 


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1 


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8 


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20 


4 


2 


41 


30 


2 


9 


3 




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2 


1 


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9 


8 




1 


1 


2 




.. 16 


7 


8 


1 


32 


27 


2 


3 


2 






.. 36 


34 


27 


3 


100 


74 


8 


18 


13 


1 


4 


.. 1 


1 


3 


4 


9 


8 




1 


1 




2 


. . 13 


18 


5 


3 


39 


20 


3 


16 






1 


.. 24 


29 


7 


1 


61 


38 


14 


9 


5 




2 


. . 15 


17 


1 


1 


34 


23 


7 


4 


1 




1 


. . 22 


22 


17 


1 


62 


34 


16 


12 


3 


i 


6 


6 8 


1 




1 


16 


14 


2 











Pass 

Supplementals 

Classics 

Greek and Hebrew 

Latin ' French or Greek Option i 

Modern Languages 

Oriental Languages 

English Language and Literature 

Fine Art 

Law 

Social and Philosophical Studies 

Philosophy (English or History Option) 

Mathematics and Physics 

Science 

Household Economics 

Commerce and Finance 

Occasional Students 



Totals 



6 427 359 160 154 1.106 715 220 171 37 5 77 



154 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Second Year 



Cours 



. « c 

c/) o 



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H 
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Pass 

Supplementals 

Classics 

Latin (French or Greek Option) Div, I. 

Modern Languages 

Oriental Languages 

English and History 

Law 

Modern History 

Philosophy 

Philosophy (English or Hist. Option) . . 

Political Science and Economics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Mathematics and Physics 

Physics and Chemistry 

Biological and Medical Sciences 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology . . . 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Household Economics 

Physics 

Physiology and Biochemistry 

Commerce and Finance 

Occasional Students 

Totals 



112 100 

56 45 

6 1 

1 4 
19 22 

2 .. 
8 13 

24 2 

4 2 

1 5 

3 5 
8 10 

7 6 



42 83 337 

21 23 145 

1 .. 8 

1 2 

9 4 



5 
22 
5 
5 
2 
6 
4 
1 



9 
6 

2 
8 
2 
2 
2 
4 
19 17 

1 1 
3 2 

26 20 

2 .. 



3 
3 
3 
1 
4 
15 
1 



11 



256 55 26 
112 32 1 

7 .. 1 

8 .. .. 
45 .. 9 

1 
25 
26 

9 
14 
18 
20 
11 
13 
21 

2 
11 

4 

4 

6 

2 
25 

2 .. .. 

2 1 2 
35 13 12 

4 1 .. 



1 16 



1 



3 352 290 127 138 910 683 129 98 4 27 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



155 



Third Year 



Course 






U cj 






u 



Pass 

Supplementals 

General 

Classics 

Latin (French or Greek Option) Div. I 

Latin (French or Greek Option), Div. II . . . . 

Modern Languages 

Oriental Languages 

English and History 

Law 

Modern History 

Philosophy 

Philosophy (English or History Option) .... 

Political Science and Economics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Mathematics and Physics. Div. I 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. H 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. Ill 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. IV & V 

Physics and Chemistry 

Biological and Medical Sciences 

Biology 

Chemistry 

Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology, Div. I. . 
Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology. Div. II. 

Geology and Mineralogy 

Household Economics 

Physics 

Physiology and Biochemistry 

Science (General) 

Commerce and Finance 

Occasional Students 



115 107 

50 44 

4 9 

2 4 



49 60 331 278 36 17 



1 3 
23 19 

3 .. 

9 
17 

1 

2 

4 
18 

3 

5 

5 

3 

1 

2 



11 
6 
3 
1 
9 
5 
5 
9 
2 
2 
1 
2 



1 1 



9 5 
1 1 
3 5 



1 

2 

17 

1 

2 

.. 1 
24 8 



19 16 

31 30 

9 7 

14 12 

9 6 



10 
1 

4 
4 



19 15 

2 2 



29 22 

2 1 

3 2 
1 .. 

37 26 



7 105 73 28 

. . 14 14 

1 13 12 

1 3 3 

.. 4 4 

4 47 44 
.. 3 3 

3 26 23 

1 30 28 

.. 5 5 

5 8 8 
4 
1 



1 1 



Totals. 



3 318 285 98 100 804 673 86 45 



156 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Fourth Year 



Coi 






;^ o ^ > r- 



y: 



"o .r — 



— Ho 

e cs D aj 3 
U U. < a = 



3 
4 
2 
2 

i 

12 



Supplementals 2 1 

General 2 7 1 

Classics 7 3 3 

Hebrew and Ancient History 1 

Latin (French or Greek Option), Div. 1 3 

Modern Languages 22 14 

English and History 13 14 

Law 13 5 

Modern Historj' 1 3 

Philosophy 1 2 

Philosophy (English or History Option ) 5 4 

Political Science and Economics 7 6 

Psychology 2 

Sociology 3 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. 1 3 4 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. H 7 3 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. HI 1 1 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. IV 2 2 

Mathematics and Physics, Div. V 1 

Physics and Chemistry 3 1 

Biological and Medical Sciences 13 7 

Biology 1 1 

Chemistry 5 2 

Chemistry, Mineralogy and Geology, Div. \\ 1 1 

Geology and Mineralogy 2 

Household Economics 13 14 

Physiology and Biochemistry 2 1 

Science (General) 1 1 

Commerce and Finance 10 15 

Occasional Students 1 



. 3 3 

1 11 11 

. 13 13 

. 1 1 

1 4 4 
3 42 40 
. 31 30 
. 20 20 

2 8 8 
5 8 7 

1 11 11 
. 25 25 
. 2 2 
. 4 4 
. 8 6 

2 12 11 



2 23 22 
. 3 3 

3 11 11 
. 3 3 
. 2 2 
. 29 29 

1 7 7 
. 2 2 
. 31 31 

2 3 3 



Totals. 



1 141 118 46 24 330 321 



3 11 



Pass Course for Teachers 



Passed 



Conditioned 



Total 



August Examination 
May Examination . . , 



481 
534 



1.015 



140 
154 



294 



621 
688 



1.309 



Faculty of Medicine 



Passed Conditioned 



Failed 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Fifth Year 

Sixth Year 

Candidates for Degree of B.Sc. (Med.) . 
Candidates for Diploma in Public Health 

Totals 



75 


26 


48 


87 


29 


18 


79 


29 


14 


116 


20 


2 


94 


14 


2 


100 


17 


2 


3 






17 







571 



135 



86 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



157 



Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering 



Passed with 
Honours Passed Conditioned 



Failed 



First Year — 

Civil Engineering ....... 

Mining Engineering .... 

Mechanical Engineering 

Architecture 

Engineering Physics . . . 
Chemical Engineering . . . 
Electrical Engineering . . 
Metallurgical Engineering 

Second Year — 

Civil Engineering 

Mining Engineering .... 
Mechanical Engineering , 

Architecture 

Engineering Physics .... 
Chemical Engineering.... 
Electrical Engineering..., 
Metallurgical Engineering, 

Third Year- 
Civil Engineering 

Mining Engineering 

Mechanical Engineering.. 

Architecture 

Engineering Physics 

Chemical Engineering.... 
Electrical Engineering.... 
Metallurgical Engineering. 

Fourth Year — 

Civil Engineering 

Mining Engineering 

Mehanical Engineering. . . 

Architecture 

Chemical Engineering.... 
Electrical Engineering.... 
Metallurgical Engineering. 

Fifth Year- 
Architecture 

Totals 



2 


4 


6 


6 


5 


29 


13 


24 


.3 


15 


9 


11 


1 


1 


1 




2 


4 


6 




5 


29 


13 


16 


2 


15 


13 


7 


3 


12 


6 


3 


1 


8 


7 


1 


3 


23 


6 


4 


3 


8 

2 


8 


8 


5 


1 


i 




8 


26 


18 


18 


/ 


13 


2 


6 


6 


6 


1 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


12 


13 


3 


4 


14 


7 


3 


2 


."» 


1 




1 


2 


3 




14 


15 


10 


3 


2 


11 


7 


1 




7 


6 




2 


7 


3 


1 


.5 


5 


5 




4 


12 


5 




.5 


3 






15 


30 


3 


, . 


7 


12 


5 


1 


1 


5 







127 



344 



179 



119 



Faculty of Household Science 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Supplementals 

Totals 



Passed 


Conditioned 


Failed 


2 


2 




2 


5 


3 


9 


3 


3 


12 






3 







28 



10 



158 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Ontario College of Education 

Passed Failed 

*High School Assistants" Course 272 

Specialists' Courses 108 

First Class Public School Course 46 

Elementary Art Course 28 

Elementary' Commercial Course ( passed in part ) 41 

Elementary Music Course 19 

Elementary Physical Education Course 93 

Intermediate Household Science Course 5 

Librarians' Course — 

Candidates for Degree of B.L.S 31 

Candidates for Diploma 7 

Bachelor of Pedagogy Course — 

Candidates for Degree of B.Paed 42 

Passed in part 125 

Number who failed in whole or part . . ,136 

Totals 817 1 36 

*Many of these are included among those who passed or failed in the other courses in this list. 



Faculty of Forestry 



Passed Conditioned Deferred 



Failed 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Total 



12 


/ 


I 1 


S 


3 


1 


6 






7 






30 


10 


1 2 



Faculty of Music 



Passed Conditioned Failed 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Totals 



21 



17 



Faculty of Dentistry 



Passed Conditioned Failed 



First Year 

Second Year 

Third Year 

Fourth Year 

Fifth Year 

Dental Nurses. . . . 

Total 



26 


10 


2 


25 


16 


, , 


33 


2 


1 


23 


4 


, , 


51 






20 


3 





178 



35 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 159 



Departments 

The numbers examined in the different departments of the University, including 
those persons granted standing for military service, were as follows: 

Arts: 

Fourth Year 330 

Third Year 804 

Second Year 910 

First Year 1,106 

Pass Course for Teachers 1,309 

Graduates ( Specialist Standing ) 55 

4,514 

Medicine : 

Sixth Year 119 

Fifth Year 110 

Fourth Year 138 

Third Year 122 

Second Year 134 

First Year 142 

Candidates for Degree of B.Sc. ( Med. ) 3 

Candidates for Diploma in Public Health 17 

■ 792 

Applied Science and Engineering: 

Fifth Year 12 

Fourth Year 136 

Third Year 152 

Second Year 202 

First Year 266 

768 

Household Science 42 

Education 611 

Forestry 33 

Music 47 

Graduate Studies 500 

Dentistry 216 

Social Science 93 

School of Nursing 100 

University Extension: 

Occupational Therapy 51 

Physiotherapy 47 

Law 8 

Pharmacy 214 

Agriculture 116 

Veterinary Science 36 

Local Examinations in Music 13,498 



160 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



(i) Admission to Degrees; 



Men 

D.Eng. ( Honorary ) 1 

LL.D. ( Honorary) 12 

D.Sc. ( Honorary ) 1 

Ph.D 26 

M.A 59 

M.A.Sc 10 

C.E 2 

.M.Arch. 

D. Paed 3 

M.S.A 2 

B.A 332 

B.Com 29 

M.D 105 

B.Sc. (Med.) 3 

B.A.Sc 129 

B.Arci 7 

B.H.Sc 

B.Paed 39 

B.L.S 1 

B.Sc.F 9 

Mus. Bac 7 

D.D.S 51 

LL.B 2 

B.S.A 106 

B.V.Sc 34 

Phm.B 78 

Totals 1-048 



^omen 


Total 




1 




12 




1 


6 


32 


28 


87 


1 


11 




2 


1 


1 




3 




2 


311 


643 


2 


31 


8 


113 


1 


4 


1 


130 




7 


2i 


21 


3 


42 


30 


31 




9 




7 




51 




2 


2 


108 




34 


6 


84 



421 



1,469 



(j) Admission to Diplomas and Certificates 



Dental Nursing 

Librarianship 

Occupational Therapy 
Physical Education... 

Physiotherapy 

Psychiatry 

Public Health 

Public Health Nursing 

Radiology 

Social Science 

Totals. . . 



Men 


Women 


Total 




20 


20 




7 


7 




19 


19 




1 


1 




12 


12 


5 




5 


4 




4 




72 


72 


1 




1 


5 


35 


40 



15 



166 



181 



(k) Geographical Distribution of Students: 

FACULTY OF ARTS 



University 
of Toronto 



University 
College 



Victoria 
College 



Trinity 
College 



St. 
Michaels 

College 



Dupli- 
cates 



Totals 



Ontario: (1) Province 
(2) Toronto. 

Nova Scotia 

New Brunswick 

Prince Edward Island. 

Quebec 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British Columbia .... 

United States 

Elsewhere 

Totals 1.387 



678 


407 


369 


139 


93 


2 1,684 


664 


614 


528 


232 


174 


2 2.210 


3 


1 


2 


1 




7 




1 






i 


2 


4 


6 


4 


i 




is 


5 


6 


1 


4 




16 


10 


18 


6 


2 




36 


11 


7 


3 




i 


22 


5 


4 


1 


3 


2 


15 


5 


13 


1 


3 


92 


114 


2 


9 


12 


4 


4 


31 



1.086 



927 



389 



367 



4,152 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 161 



/ 



THE L'NIVERSITY 



>. >. >. c >._z: _£ - >■ 



— 


= 


^ X. 


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^■^ 


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H 




c/. 




c c 


Z 


— 




— 




c 


c 


X o 


*— 


.Zi 


X 


w 


■r 






£ ''^ 












- 


-■ 


- 


3 


■^ 


- 


< 


































X 


;, 


■— ;, 


_^ 


w 


-*■ 




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a: 


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Ontario: 

(1) Province 1,684 297 327 19 431 12 14 170 99 34 250 24 19 17 3.363 

(2) Toronto 2.210 487 425 20 202 16 24 302 78 33 205 17 15 28 4.007 

Nova Scotia 7 2 1.. 9.. 121.. 3 4 48 

New Brunswick 2 8 . . . . 1 . . 1 18 2 1 5 . . . . 1 37 

Prince Edward Island .. 2 2 .. 1 5 

Quebec 15 10 3 .. 7 2 2 6 1 2 1 .. .. 1 48 

Manitoba 16 4 3 1 6 1 . . 21 6 5 3 1 2 .. 69 

Saskatcheman 36 16 11 .. 18 1 . . 23 16 8 13 1 2 .. 145 

Alberta 22 9 6 .. 5 .. 1 6 1 2 7 .. 3 1 61 

British Columbia 15 18 4 2 16 1 4 20 1 2 7 2 . . . . 92 

United States 114 9 4 1 .. .. 3 26 8 .. 2 167 

Elsewhere 31 11 5 .. 2 .. .. 22 9 3 11 94 

Totals 4,152 873 789 43 698 33 50 637 221 93 509 45 41 48 8.136 



162 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



1/ — I 

a. c 

<~ 

— c 

— c^ 
~ c 



, -o c •- ^ 



^5 



3 3 O "C 3 









- 2 ::? 



Algoma 23 12 3 

Brant 34 10 8 

Bruce 40 3 5 

Carleton 65 9 13 

Cochrane 17 2 

Dufferin 26 1 1 

Dundas 3 . . 3 

Durham 30 3 1 

Elgin 17 . . 3 

Essex 52 11 16 

Frontenac 4 1 

Glengarry 1 . . 1 

Grenville 6 1 

Grev 59 7 4 

Haldimand 14 2 2 

Haliburton 

Halton 29 3 14 

Hastings 25 4 2 

Huron 45 2 3 

Kenora 4 3 2 

Kent 14 6 11 

Lambton 30 9 8 

Lanark 8 1 4 

Leeds 6 4 1 

Lennox & Addington ... 5 

Lincoln 49 6 16 

Manitoulin 1 

Middlesex 14 2 3 

Muskoka 18 6 2 

Nipissing 21 13 4 

Norfolk 9 5 4 

Northumberland 26 2 3 

Ontario 63 9 5 

Oxford 26 9 8 

Parrv Sound 16 1 1 

Peel' 65 5 17 

Perth 54 11 2 

Peterborough 32 5 5 

Prescott 3 

Prince Edward 12 1 1 

Rainy River 3 4 1 

Renfrew 22 1 

Russell 

.Simcoe 112 14 16 

Stormont 7 2 2 

Sudbury 25 .. 1 

Thunder Bay 27 3 8 

Timiskaming 21 8 10 

Victoria . . .~ 29 5 5 

Waterloo 44 12 15 

Welland 53 15 21 

Wellington 86 11 13 

Wentworth 68 26 23 

York 221 27 36 

Toronto 2.210 487 425 

Totals 3,894 784 752 



10 .. 


1 




3 


2 


9 


2 




1 


14 1 




3 




2 


8 




2 


1 


10 .. 




6 


5 




9 


i 






25 .. 




1 


8 




12 








2 .. 






4 


i 










4 .. 










5 








4 .. 




1 


1 


1 










5 .. 




3 


2 


1 


i 


2 






10 .. 




2 


2 




1 








29 .. 




6 




1 


8 


i 


1 


1 


14 .. 




3 


1 




5 


1 






2 .. 






1 


i 


1 


1 






6 .. 








1 










7 . . 




2 


6 




7 




i 


1 


2 .. 




2 






1 

1 


1 


2 




3 .. 




4 


1 




11 


i 






12 .. 






4 




7 


1 


1 




4 1 




5 






1 

1 








9 1 




9 


2 




4 




i 




7 




4 


4 




4 


1 


1 




5 .. 




1 


1 






2 






7 






2 




2 








4 .. 












i 






5 .. 




6 


3 




io 






2 


2\ '. '. 




io 


i 


2 


i7 








3 1 




1 


1 




2 








11 .. 




2 


3 




6 


1 


2 




2 .. 




5 


6 




1 


1 






4 .. 




1 






3 


1 






11 .. 




6 


1 


3 


10 








9 .. 




7 


1 


1 


3 








3 .. 




1 


1 






1 






9 .. 




4 




3 


2 


1 






12 1 




4 


2 


1 


3 








5 .. 




3 


2 




8 








2 .. 


















2 .. 




1 


















1 
3 
1 
8 


4 




2 

13 


2 






5 .. 




6 .. 


2 


5 .. 
10 .' .' 


i 

1 


1 
3 


6 




1 
.3 








7 1 






1 




5 








5 1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


3 






2 


12 .. 




1 


3 


1 


16 








10 1 


2 


4 


4 




4 








6 .. 


3 


15 


1 


2 


8 






1 



58 
13 



20 
9 



14 
18 



1 1 

2 1 



64 

81 

80 

141 

26 

38 

13 

48 

35 

125 

29 

8 

14 

92 

26 

1 

69 

57 

61 

9 

51 

61 

22 

24 

11 

94 

1 

72 

35 

63 

33 

40 

108 

65 

24 

103 

91 

62 

5 

17 

9 

33 

1 

175 

18 

29 

61 

54 

51 

106 

115 

144 

225 

335 



20 203 16 24 302 78 33 205 17 15 28 4.007 
39 634 28 38 472 177 67 455 41 34 45 7.370 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

Superintendent's Office 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 
1936-37 



While the office is considering and developing plans for new construction, no 
new work of a major nature was started during the vear. Work on the addition to 
the Royal Ontario Museum, to house the Chinese Library, was started, and this and 
other items, mainly at the Connaught Laboratories Farm, bring the expenditure under 
this item to approximately $19,000.00. 

Buildings (Maintenance) 

During the year approximately $78,000.00 was expended on Repairs and 
Renewals of the University buildings and the Royal Ontario Museum. This 
expenditure, which is less than one-half of one percent of replacement valuation, is 
used largely in maintaining the fabric and mechanical services in the buildings. Such 
items as lighting and decoration cannot be kept up to the desired standard. 

During the year the regular practice of testing all fire hose has been followed, 
and the necessary replacements made. Chemical extinguishers have all been 
inspected, and special extinguishers provided for special hazards. 

In addition to the 57 buildings directly supervised by my office, heat and 
electricity are supplied to Knox College, Victoria University and Wycliffe College, 
and some power to Trinity College. 

The expenditures for fuel and electricity for L^niversity buildings, the Roval 
Ontario Museum, and the services to the colleges noted above, was approximately 
S135,000.00. The consumption of electricity continues to increase. For financial 
reasons, and due to the inadequacy of our generating and distribution systems, this 
growth is checked as much as possible, even to the extent of lagging behind accepted 
practice. 

Employees and Workshops 

The average number of employees working for the office, exclusive of contracts, 
was 267. tradesmen accounting for 77 of this number. The merchandise distributed 
through the Superintendent's Stores amounted to approximately $89,000.00. The 
wage item for sundry labour was approximately $271,000.00. which, with salaries 
of $33,000.00, makes a total of approximately $304,000.00. These figures include 
services rendered through my office to Connaught Laboratories, Hart House, the 
Athletic Association, etc.. the Royal Ontario Museum, and the colleges. 

[163] 



164 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Purchasing 

During the year, 8,834 departmental order and 6,885 Superintendent's Stores 
and work orders, a total of 15,719, were sent out, and, in consequence, 22,134 
accounts were passed for payment. These purchases involved the passing of 1,197 
customs entries handled within the office. In addition, 6,161 accounts for work done 
for separate financial entities were sent out for payment. Accounts are passed 
promptly for payment, so that all possible discounts are obtained. Every effort is 
made to obtain the benefits to which the University is properly entitled under the 
Customs and sales and Excise Acts. 

Post Office 

During the year the turnover in the branch Port Office in the University amounted 
to approximatelv S36. 700.00. of which the sale of postage stamps amounted to 
approximately $23,300.00. The University derived a revenue of $1,124.70 from 
this source. 

Police and Watchmen 

The Police Force, though small, is successful in handling the problems created 
bv the public, and its relationship with the student body is cordial, and, at the same 
time, effective. A close supervision is maintained on the watchmen's service, and 
daily reports are carefully checked. 

We are indebted to the City Police for their willing co-operation at all times. 

Central Plant 

As each vear the Central Plant gets older, and the load on it increases, its 
inadequacv becomes more and more evident. The construction of a new and larger 
plant should not be longer delayed. 

The amount of radiation heated from the Central Plant, exclusive of high 
pressure service, was 348.140 square feet, as against 347,856 for the previous year. 
The total cost of operation was $134,894.94, as against $139,182.38 for the previous 
year. The total unit cost for heat and light was 38.7 cents per square foot of 
radiation, as against 40.0 cents for the previous year. The amount of 38.7 cents was 
made up of 22.0 cents for heat and 16.7 cents for light and power. The average 
temperature, October to May, inclusive, was 3.3 degrees above the average, against 
1.24 degrees above the average for the same period the year before. The unit cost of 
coal was approximately the same as for the previous year. 

Comparative tables, showing the operation of the Central Plant and the 
distribution of charges for 1935-36 and 1936-37, are attached. 

A. D. LePan, 

Superintendent. 
November 4th, 1937. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



165 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



167 



POWER HOUSE 

COAL 1935-36 1936-37 

Maximum daily consumption 99 tons 90 tons 

Maximum weekly consumption 631 tons 527 tons 

Average daily consumption — 

September 21 tons 13 tons 

October ^ tons 40 tons 

November 52 tons 60 tons 

December 69 tons 61 tons 

January 70 tons 61 tons 

February 79 tons 65 tons 

March 58 tons 62 tons 

April 50 tons 50 tons 

I^ay 22 tons 25 tons 

June 12 tons 10 tons 

Consumption — Central Plant 13.838 tons 13.315 tons 

Auxiliary Plant. Museum Area 1.362 tons 1,174 tons 

Total Consumption 15.200 tons 14,489 tons 

Total cost of operation $139,182.38 $134,894.94 

Load in square feet of radiation 347,856 348,140 

Light and Power Charges « 55.712.70 $ 58.152.83 

Cost of Heat S 83,469.68 $ 76.742.11 

Cost of Heat per square foot of radiation 24.0c 22.0c 

NOTE: In this distribution of cost, no allowance is made for high pressure steam supplied. 



TEMPERATURES 

October 

November 

December 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Yearly average . . . . 



1935-36 



1936-37 



50.2 


3.6 


above average 


49.0 


2.4 above average 


39.8 


3.8 


above average 


34.3 


1.7 below average 


22.7 


3.5 


below average 


31.5 


5.3 above average 


22.4 


.5 


above average 


31.2 


9.4 above average 


17.5 


5.0 


below average 


27.9 


5.7 above average 


34.5 


5.8 


above average 


28.6 


0.1 below average 


39.6 


1.6 


below average 


43.2 


2.0 above average 


58.7 


6.3 


above average 


56.5 


4.0 above average 


35.67 


1.24 


above average 


37.7 


3.3 above average 



168 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE 

Toronto, 19 November, 1937. 
To the Governors of the University of Toronto : 

Gentlemen : 

I have verified the attached Balance Sheet of the University dated 30th June, 
1937, and Schedules 1 to 10, and report that all the transactions of the year upon the 
Revenue and Capital Accounts have been duly audited and found correct. 

The securities representing your investments are held in safekeeping by your 
bankers. The Canadian Bank of Commerce, and were produced for my examination 
on 2nd July, 1937, and also at another time during the year and found to be in 
agreement with the records kept by the Bursar. Your securities consist largely of 
bonds issued or guaranteed by the Dominion of Canada and by the Province of 
Ontario and bonds of Ontario municipalities with certain corporation and other 
securities received as bequests. Their approximate market value as at 30th June, 
1937. was greater than their book value by $860,110.74. 

Bonds of the following municipalities which are included in your investments 
are in arrears of interest from one to five years or interest payments are being 
received at reduced rates: 

Par Value Book Value 

Town of Mimico 

51/2% 1942-1945 $21,000.00 $21,919.25 

Essex Border Utilities 

SV2% 1945-1947 19,047.60 19,802.72 

Town of Weston 

5% 1936-1953 51,041.94 50,496.51 

Town of Bridgeburg 

51/1!% 1936-1946 23.194.01 23,746.75 

Township of East York 

5% 1944-1946 30,000.00 29,810.74 

Township of York 

5% 1935-1936 16,000.00 15,942.20 

Township of Scarborough 

5% 1943-1957 73.697.27 74,765.96 

Bonds of Walkerville and Leaside were also in arrears at 30th June but are not 
included in the foregoing list as they have since that date made settlement with their 
bond creditors by refunding or by paying off the arrears. 

I also report that no income was received from certain non-trustee securities 
which came to you from the Wallberg and Whitney bequests. 

The Bursar's records are well kept and all Endowment and Trust Funds properly 
accounted for. 

Yours faithfully, 

G. T. Clarkson, 

Auditor. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

BALANCE SHEET, 30th JUNE, 1937 

Funds and Liabilities 

General Endowment Schedule 1 $13,127,008 28 

Specific Endowments (Scholarships. Prizes, etc.) " 2 509,364 83 

Trust Funds " 3 6,629,204 88 

Pension and Retirement Funds " 4 1,044,139 36 

Annuity Debentures " 5 1,207,573 97 

Contingent Funds, etc " 6 229.914 89 

Fees paid in advance 617 00 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons 50,000 00 

$22,797,823 21 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 169 

Assets 

Site Land, Buildings and Contents Schedule 7 $12,036,148 85 

Unproductive Lands " 8 58.622 40 

Leased Properties " 9 752.975 71 

Investments, Cash and Accounts Receivable. ... " 10 9,176,850 06 

Royal Ontario Museum Investment 248,376 30 

Ontario Government Annuities tl6 George V. Cap. 69 • 87,129 05 

Ontario Government Annuities (18 George V, Cap. 55) 433,243 34 

Superintendents Stores Appendix IV 14,477 50 



-$22,797,823 21 



NOTE: This statement does not include any assets or liabilities of The Toronto Conservatory 
of Music. 

SCHEDULE 1 

General Endowment 
Additions for 1936-37: 
Annuity debentures: 

Portion of 1936-37 instalments reducing principal: 

Twenty-eighth instalment, issue of July, 1909 $ 15.170 52 

Twenty-sixth instalment, issue f>f January. 1911 3.645 00 

Twenty-sixth instalment, issue of January, 1911 8.412 00 

Twenty-second instalment, issue of April, 1915 2.588 97 

Thirteenth instalment, issue of July. 1924 6,768 40 

Eighth instalment, issue of Januarv, 1929 34,041 98 

$ 70.626 87 

Convocation Hall Advance: 

Restoration from proceeds of Wild Lands Sales,, thirtieth instalment 30 00 

Land and building: 

No. 53 St. George Street, purchased from Edward John Perkins 
Estate, building now demolished, area 21,780 sq. feet at cost price 

carried in Site Lands (Schedule 7 ) 17,318 70 

Library proper: 

Additions for year less depreciation ( Schedule 7 ) 31,181 00 

$ 119.156 57 

Contra 
Reduction in valuation hitherto carried for No. 188 Yonge Street (Schedule 9) 70.000 00 



$ 49,156 57 
Return of 30th June. 1936 13.077,851 71 



Return of 30th June, 1937 $13,127,008 28 

SCHEDULE 2 

Specific Endowments 

(Scholarships, Prizes, etc.) 

A. A. A. S. Scholarship ( Physics, etc. ) $2,350 00 

Aggett, Harvey, Memorial ( Applied Science ) 1.653 90 

Aikins (English Literature) 5,298 73 

Alexander Lectureship (English Literature) 14,657 48 

All Souls' Historical Essay Prize 3.093 14 

Armstrong. George H., ( Historv) 2,276 99 

B. A. A. S.. Medals, etc ' 13 62 

Bain. H. R., ( Matriculation, Applied .Science » 800 00 

Balfour Lectureship CSurgery ) 4.679 60 

Balmer, Jean ( Science ) 1.245 54 

Bankers" ( Political Science) 1,310 87 

Baptie, Margaret W., ( Medicine and Science ) 4,047 47 

Bastedo. Alma Anderson. Memorial Prize ( English ) 512 86 

Blake (Matriculation) 31.206 72 

Blake ( Science and Moderns ) 3.7.50 00 

Boiler Inspection and Insurance Company (Applied Science) 150 00 

Booth (University Schools) 1.000 51 

Brickner. Rabbi ( .Social Science ) 1.034 1 1 

Brock. Margaret A., (Matriculation. English and History) 1.081 40 

Brown. George, Memorial ( Medical .Science » 10.856 .58 

Brown. George (Modern Languages) 1.128 34 



170 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Bruce, Robert (Arts and Medicine) 1,375 20 

Chappell, Walter F., Prize (Medicine or Surgery) 501 77 

Cockburn, G. R. R., (Greek) 1,050 00 

Cody, Florence (Matriculation) 2,531 63 

Cody, Henry John ( Matriculation ) 2,533 02 

Cody, Maurice, Memorial (Modern History) 3,189 63 

Cody, Maurice, Memorial Prize 1,270 35 

Cody, Maurice, Memorial (University Schools ) 261 45 

Coleman Medal ( Geology ) 501 15 

Copp, John, Memorial Fund (Medicine) 5,039 20 

Crawford, Allan Rudyard (University Schools) 525 00 

Crawford, Henry Job ( University Schools ) 1,049 61 

Derling & Pearson Prize (Architecture) 100 00 

De Lury, Alfred T.. (Mathematics ) 3,547 35 

Dickenson, Marion E., (Household Science) 5,746 13 

Dunlap, David, Memorial ( Psychology ) 1,325 00 

Findlay. J. A.. ( Mechanical Engineering) 2,014 67 

Fletcher-Johnston Memorial Prize ( Latin ) 10 00 

Fulton, Alexander T., (Mathematics and Science ) 3,351 30 

Gibson (Matriculation) 3,868 50 

Gibson (Pass Matriculation) 5,034 50 

Glen Mawr Old Girls' Association (English and History) 2,301 33 

Goldsmith, Perry ( Oto-Laryngology ) 3,063 19 

Grasett Memorial (Classics) 5.317 96 

Hardie, William (Matriculation) 2,350 00 

Harris, James (Matriculation, University College) 26,074 42 

Hastings (Public Health and Nursing) 11,284 54 

Henderson. Joseph, Memorial (Matriculation) 2,265 44 

Hendry, William John (Obstetrics ) 3,009 24 

Hollywood Theatre Prizes (French) 50 00 

Hutton, Maurice (Classics) 5,480 03 

International Mathematical Congress, 1924 (Medals) 2,732 88 

Irwin. Herbert W., Memorial (Modern Languages) 1,033 15 

Isserman, Rabbi, Prize ( Social Science) 864 77 

Jenkins (Engineering) 300 00 

Kennedy, George ( Philosophv ) 4 45 

Kennedy, Sarah (Household Economics) 4 45 

Khaki University Memorial 3,318 71 

Laurier, Sir Wilfrid. Memorial (French) 2,222 61 

Lawler. Gertrude, Memorial (English and History) 3,178 18 

Lawler, Gertrude. Prize (English) 303 97 

Lindsley Fellowship (Geophysics ) 1,600 00 

Lister Prize (Surgery) 5.320 10 

Lyle Medal (Orientals) 639 42 

McCaul Medal (Classics) 550 93 

McCharles. AEneas, Prize 20,892 92 

McCrae. John (Matriculation) 10.885 11 

McCrea, Dent (Law) 50 00 

Macdonald, John (Philosophy) 2,330 00 

Mackenzie, Alexander, Memorial (Political Science) 16,425 00 

Mackenzie. J. J.. Fellowship (Pathology) 5,714 02 

McLean, J. S., Fellowship (University (ilollege) 2,500 00 

McLean. J. S., (Matriculation, University College) 8.150 00 

MacLennan-MacLeod Memorial Prize (Applied Science) 512 50 

MacMurchy. Angus. Medal (Law) 1,018 54 

McPhedran. Alexander. Research Fellowship (Medicine) 29,903 37 

Marfleet. Pearson Kirkman, Lectureship 8,229 67 

Mickle, Charles. Fellowship 28,877 46 

Mickle. Ellen. Fellowship 28.958 95 

Moss (Classics) 2.000 00 

Mulock. Marv (Classics) 2,838 74 

Mulock. William ( Classics and Mathematics ) 2,000 00 

Neelands. Florence M., Prize (French) 513 75 

Nesbitt, Wallace, Medals (University Schools) 581 82 

Nipissing Research Fellowship (Mining) 21,054 60 

Ontario Association of .Architects 100 00 

Ontario Hockey Association War Memorial (Matriculation) 2,025 00 

Pakenham Memorial Prize 1,007 38 

Pan-Hellenic Association Prizes (University College) 150 00 

Peters. George A., (Surgery) 3,560 23 

Porter, T. M., (University Schools) 6,017 08 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 171 



Porter, T. M., (Corrigan gift) University Schools 

Prince of Wales ( Matriculation 

Quebec Bonne Entente Prize ( French ) 

Ramsay, William (Physics) 

Ramsay, William ( Political Economy ) 

Ransom, A. C, ( Applied Science ) 

Reeve, Anna Howe, Prize (Household Science) 

Reeve, R. A.. Prize ( Medicine ) 

Richardson, James H., Research Fellowship (Anatomy) 

Rossin, Julius (Modern Languages) 

Rowell. Langf ord ( Law ) 

Rowell, Langf ord (University Schools) 

Saddington, Ronald S.. Medal ( Pathology ) 

St. Margaret's College Alumnae (Social Science) 

St. Margaret's College Alumnae Prize (Public Speaking) 

Squair French Prose Prize 

Starr Bequest ( Medals ) 

Strang, Hugh Innis. Memorial ( Classics ) 

Toronto Women's League of LInited Synagogue Prize (Medicine) 

Tracy ( Philosophy ) 

Ubukata ( Japanese students ) 

University College Alumni Scholarship (Matriculation) 

U. T. S. Engineering 

Vander Smissen ( German ) 

Wickett, Morley (Matriculation, English and History) 

Wilson. Daniel ( Natural Science ) 

Wright, Ramsay ( Zoology ) 

Wrong. George M., ( Modern History ) 

Young Memorial ( Philosophy ) 



LOOO 00 


1,000 00 


LOOO 00 


L129 70 


L314 42 


5,016 80 


674 55 


50 00 


10,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,012 06 


2,000 00 


1 55 


75 00 


602 37 


310 16 


7,702 62 


2,789 94 


50 00 


932 16 


10,556 12 


50 00 


250 00 


2M7 79 


2,281 04 


2,000 00 


17,604 21 


3,728 37 


6.082 24 



Ledger Balances on 30th June, 1937 $ 509,364 83 

Return of 30th June. 1936 $496,167 28 

Additions to funds during year ( including income from 

investments ) 39,723 23 

Interest written to endowments 6,122 08 

542,012 59 

Expended for scholarships, prizes, etc 32,647 76 



Return of 30th June. 1937 $509,364 83 

SCHEDULE 3. 

Trust Funds 

Banting Researc'i Foundation $713,215 22 

Banting Research Foundation ( Reserve ) 9,459 20 

Carnegie Corporation, Educational Research 4,736 82 

Carnegie Corporation, Language Study 3.438 82 

Carnegie Corporation, Library, Universitv College 2,622 83 

Carnegie Corporation, Professorship in Physics 622 50 

Carnegie Corporation. Fine Art Lectureship 2,419 50 

Carnegie Corporation, Workmen's Educational Association 1,956 36 

Connaught Laboratories Research 200,000 00 

Dental Research 373 44 

Dunlap Bequest (Medical Research) 109.237 40 

Eaton Endowment ( Medicine ) 51.793 25 

Engineering Society Donation 177 49 

Fairclough, William Erving, Memorial 25,163 50 

Fasken, David. Trust 4.807 11 

Forster. J. W. L., Fine Art Donation 758 48 

Fulford Estate Donation 3,1 55 36 

Honor, John, Bequest (Arts) 10,41 1 79 

Horton, John Hughes. Beauest (not allocated ) 796 67 

Hoskin, John, Bequest (Residences) 12.962 28 

Insulin Committee, Surplus 814,472 12 

Langton, John, Memorial 30 00 

Leonard. Reuben Wells. Bequest 79.834 04 

Library Funds: 

Abbott Dental 132 33 

King Alfred Millenary 10,025 58 

Phillips Stewart 1.501 22 



172 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

John Squair i French I No. 1 1,000 00 

John Squair ( French I No. 2 1,002 78 

Graduates" Deposits 3,283 77 

Massey Foundation 261,065 26 

Massey-Treble Bequest, Household Science 26.205 84 

Medical Research. Banting 160,986 80 

Medical Research. Best 98,479 44 

Mendel. Bruno, Fund 2.970 74 

McLennan. Sir John, Bequest < Scientific Research I 4,031 86 

Ontario Archaeology — Special Research 722 97 

Porter. T. M., Bequest 11.712 90 

Reeve. R. A.. Bequests ( not allocated ) 18,191 57 

Rockefeller (Medical Endowment) 1,043,912 50 

Rockefeller ( Hygiene Endowment I 860.687 78 

Rockefeller (Alberta Social Credit » 500 00 

Rockefeller * Child Research ) 4 18 

Rockefeller ' St. George's School Printing ) 629 26 

Rockefeller (School of Nursing I 6 01 

Rutherford. Dr. James P., (Medical Research I 6.035 38 

Seldon. Lauretta M.. Bequest 53 33 

Simpson. Mary A.. Bequest 100 77 

Standard Brands Research ( Chemistry) 7 47 

Stewart, John A.. < Pernicious Anaemia I 2.367 44 

Walker. E. C. Bequest (Residences ) 58,863 08 

\^ alker. J. Harrington. Bequest (Residences) 32.397 10 

Wallberg. E. A.. Memorial 1,756,633 74 

Wallberg. E. A.. Memorial < Loan Fund ) 4.014 07 

Whitney, E. C. Bequest 199,877 87 

Wintercorbyn, Mrs. E. A.. Bequest 9.347 66 

Ledger balances on 30th June. 1937 $6,629,204 88 

Return of 30th June. 1936 $5,544,482 61 

Additions to funds during year (including income from investments 1.569.064 01 
Interest written to endowments 56,817 84 

$7,170,364 46 
Expenditures and transfers from funds 541.159 58 

Return of 30th June. 1937 $6.629,204 88 

SCHEDULE 4 
Pension ano Ret rement Funds 

1. Retirement Fund (Old Plan): 

At credit of account on 30th June, 1936 $56,565 61 

Contributions during vear 1.325 00 

Interest credited ' 2,389 25 

$60,279 86 

Withdrawals 60.279 86 

$ 

2. Pension Fund (Academic) (Commenced 1 July. 1929 i : 

At credit of account on 30f h June. 1936. . . '. $362,859 41 

Contributions during vear 45,450 01 

Interest credited. ....'. 17.235 34 

$425,544 76 

Withdrawals 14.709 02 

$410,835 74 

3. Pension Fund (Emploxees ) (Commerced 1 October. 1929 I : 

At credit of account on 30th June, 1936 $434,219 59 

Contributions during year 68 541 85 

Interest credited 19.238 57 

$522,000 01 

Withdrawals 19,396 39 

$502,603 62 

4. Estimated accrued liability as per Actuary's report at quinquennial revaluation 

in 1934 '. $130,700 00 

Return of 30th June. 1937 $1,044,139 36 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 173 

SCHEDULE 5 

Annuity Debentukes 

Issue of July, 1909. $500,000. repayable in forty equal animal amounts of $25,260 each, 

Value as on 30th June. 1937. of the twelve outstanding instalments $237,066 60 

Issue of January, 1911, under 1 George V, Cap. 80, for constructifm of Pathological 
building, $130,000, repayable in forty equal annual amounts of $6,568 each. 

Value as on 30th June, 1937, of the fourteen outstanding instalments 69,378 GO 

Accrued on 30th June. 1937. of twenty-seventh payment and charged to Revenue, 

1936-37 3,284 00 

Issue of January, 1911, under 1 George V, Cap. 80, as a grant towards construction 
of Toronto General Hospital, $300,000, repayable in forty equal annual amounts of 
$15,157 each, 

Value as on 30th June, 1937, of the fourteen outstanding instalments 160,102 00 

Accrued on 30th June. 1937. of twenty-seventh payment and charged to Revenue. 

1936-37 7,578 50 

Issue of April, 1915, under R. S. 0., 1914, Cap. 279, to provide for the payment of 
$100,000 to the Hart A. Massey Estate towards the Gymnasium portion of Hart 
House. $110,000. repayable in forty equal annual amounts of $5,975 each. 

Value as on 30th June, 1937. of the eighteen outstanding instalments 72.656 15 

Accrued on 30th June, 1937, of twenty-third payment and charged to Revenue, 

1936-37 1,244 80 

Issue of July. 1924. under R. S. O., 1914, Cap. 279, for construction of Forestry build- 
ing, $124,622, repayable in twenty equal annual amounts of $10,000 each. 

Value as on 30th June, 1937, of the seven outstanding instalments 57,863 70 

Issue of January, 1929, under R. S. 0.. 1927, Cap. 337, for construction of a new build- 
ing for Pathology and allied departments (Banting Institute I $800,000, repayable 
in twenty equal annual amounts of $64,193 each. 

Value as on 30th June, 1937. of the twelve outstanding instalments 568.978 42 

Accrued on 30th June, 1937, of ninth payment and charged to Revenue. 1936-37.. 29,421 80 



$1,207,573 97 
SCHEDULE 6 - 

Contingent Funds, Etc. 

Contingent Fund (Investment Reserve) : 

Balance brought forward from 19.36 $172,161 84 

Organ Fund : 

Balance on 30th June, 1936 $3,651 41 

Expenditure on upkeep of organ, less receipts 187 38 

3,464 03 



University Press : 

At credit of accounts as per Appendix III 52,851 58 

Ontario College of Education: 

At credit of account ( Appendix V I 43,857 62 

Sundry Legislative (rrants: 

Administration Building: 

Balance brought forward from 1936 283 15 

Botanical Building: 

Balance brought forward from 1936 1 65 

David Dunlap Observatory (Construction Account) : 

Balance brought forward from 1936 237 35 



Sundry ledger balances, items in suspense, etc.: 

Residence. Laboratory and Key deposits $3,780 07 

Fire Loss Accounts 481 65 



$272,857 22 



Fire Insurance Premiums paid in advance $32,775 84 

Workmen's Compensation Board deposit 189 87 

Banting Institute 133 34 



1,261 72 



33.099 05 



Balance at debit of Revenue on 30th June, 1936, brought forward $45,878 09 

Less credit balance at 30th June, 1937, as per Schedule 6a 31,773 09 



28,837 33 
$244,019 89 

14.105 00 
t229.914 89 



174 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



SCHEDULE 6a 

Revenue, 1936-37 

Receipts 

Estimate 

Legislative Grant, University Act, 1906 $500,000 00 

Legislative Grant, 60 Vict., Cap. 59 7,000 00 

Legislative Grant, 13-14 George V 10,000 00 

Fees, University and College, as detailed in Appendix 1 775,000 00 

Infirmary Receipts, Dentistry 30,000 00 

Interest : 

On Dominion and Provincial Government Bonds 

On Ontario Government Annuities 

On Debent iires 

On Loans 

On Bank Balances 



Rentals: 

University Park ground leases 

City of Toronto payment 

Business properties 

Sundry houses, etc 

Sundry land earnings -^ 

Men's Residences: 

(General, $13,712.05; University College, $2,574.95) 

Women's Residences: ^ 

(Whitney Hall, $48,421.02; St. George Street Group, $14,579.15). 



160,000 00 



University College Women's LInion: 

(Membership fees, $2,001; rooms and meals, $5,054.09) 

Central Power Plant: 

WycliflFe, Victoria and Knox Colleges $27,412 99 

Royal Ontario Museum 13,056 05 

Sundry accounts 12,809 33 



Press and Book Department 

Photographic Service and Casual Revenue. 



17,000 00 



68,000 00 



50,000 00 

30,000 00 

5,000 00 



$1,652,000 00 

Special Legislative Grant for 1936-37 920.000 00 

Supplementary Grant 180.000 00 



Actual 

$500,000 00 

7,000 00 

10,000 00 

806,749 66 

25,808 75 

105,350 29 

27,905 27 

3,399 94 

2,880 00 

3,185 65 



11,393 00 
6,000 00 

11,642 86 

2,151 00 

100 00 

16,287 00 

63,000 17 



7,055 09 



53.278 37 
30,000 00 
10,754 72 

$1,703,941 77 
920,000 00 
180,000 00 



$2,752,000 00 $2.803,941 77 

Expenditures 

Under appropriations as per Appendix II $2,817,600 00 $2,704,243 65 

Interest written to Scholarship and other funds 65,000 00 67,925 03 

$2.882.600 00 $2,772,168 68 

Receipts as above 2,803,941 77 

Excess of receipts over expenditures carried to Schedule 6 $ 31,773 09 

SCHEDULE 7 
Site Lands, Buildings and Contents 
Site Lands: 

2,423,843 sq. feet (ff forty cents per foot $969,537 20 

332.549 sq. feet CcT cost price 447.344 23 

18,000 sq. feet (a estimate 40,000 00 

2,774,392 sq. feet $1,456,881 43 

Buildings: 

Anatomical building $482,388 37 

Baldwin House 12.000 00 

Banting Institute 813,129 93 

Biological building 129.745 30 

Botanical building 516,998 35 

Chemical building 77,469 88 

Convocation Hall 214.866 22 

Dental building 350.000 00 

Economics building 76,350 00 

Electrical building 345.699 89 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 175 

Engineering building 50,000 00 

Forestry building 122,359 86 

Geodetic Observatory building 12,000 27 

Hart House ( not appraised ) 

Household Science building 455.000 00 

Hygiene and Public Health building 826,865 34 

Library building 327,425 50 

McLennan Laboratory 363,945 85 

Mechanical building 119,017 21 

Medical building 200,000 00 

Men's Residences 217,670 04 

Military Studies building 8,239 47 

Mining building 384.736 89 

Mill building 229,972 52 

Ontario College of Education 703,390 67 

President's House 38,767 62 

Press building 1 00 

Psychology buildings 22,333 26 

Simcoe Hall 399.055 10 

University College building 450,000 00 

University College Women's Union 70,059 19 

Women's Residences: 

Whitnev Hall 487.988 37 

Hutton House 24,723 77 

St. George Street Properties: 

Numbers 43 30,054 25 

45 39.079 67 

47 10.172 95 

49 25,007 51 

96 22,692 60 

98 16.708 84 

100 17,776 93 

106 10,034 15 

$8,704,726 77 



Library 638,572 11 

Organ 24,000 00 

Sundry Departmental Equipment 375.153 99 

Furniture and Furnishings, various buildings 43.824 81 

Arena 223.070 40 

Athletic Field Stadium and equipment 11.817 88 

Aura Lee Grounds and equipment (Ontario College of Education I 17,276 27 

Gymnasium equipment 7,620 19 

Surveying Practice Camp, Lutterworth Township, (land. 11,250, buildings, etc., 

$10,000) ._. 11,250 00 

David Dunlap Observatory (land. 141.750, buildings, $163. /OO. telescope, dome, 

etc. $225,000 ) 430.450 00 

Connaught Laboratories ( Farm, buildings and equipment ) 81.500 00 

Connaught Laboratories ( Hygiene building plant ) 1 00 

Central Power Plant ' 1 00 

Printing Plant 1 00 

General Museum Specimens 1 00 

Dining Hall equipment 1 00 



Total valuation $12,026,145 85 



Return of 30tli June, 1936 $11,977,913 55 

Additions thereto as per Schedule 1: 

Land and Building 17,318 70 

Library proper: 

Value of additions for 1936-37 reported by the 

Librarian $50,930 65 

Less depreciation fa 3% on $658.321.76 19.749 65 

31,181 00 

$12,026,413 25 

Contra 

Women's Residences Furniture written down by application of credit from .Sale of 

Wild Lands set apart for Women's Residences 264 40 

Return of 30th June, 1937 $12,026.14« 85 



176 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

SCHEDULE 8 
Unproductive Lands 

U. C. C. block on King Street $50,425 40 

Vacant land in Port Hope 8,045 00 

Endowment lands unsold in various townships 152 00 

(No transactions during vear) 
Return of 30th June. 1937 '. $58,622 40 

SCHEDULE 9 
Leased Properties 

Land leased to City of Toronto $120,000 00 

Park Lots leased (including Federated Colleges Sites) 402,992 20 

Toronto business properties 213,000 00 

Spadina Avenue houses (Nos. 719-721 1 8,023 51 

Caradoc Farm 3.000 00 

$747,015 71 

Rentals and City of Toronto payment accrued $7,295 00 

Rentals in advance 1,335 00 

5,960 00 

$752.975 71 

Return of 30th June, 1936 $824,365 71 

Reduction in figure hitherto carried for business property No. 188 

Yonge Street to conform to recent valuation 70,000 00 

$754,365 71 
Decrease in rentals past due 1,390 00 

Return of 30th June. 1937 $752,975 71 

SCHEDULE 10 
Investments, Cash and Accounts Receivable 

Dominion of Canada Bonds and guaranteed issues $3,193,958 00 

Interest accrued 8.348 89 

Interest outstanding on purchases 1,458 90 

$3,203,765 79 

Province of Ontario Bonds and guaranteed issues $2,729,851 60 

Interest accrued 17,930 59 

Interest outstanding on purchases 838 36 

■ 2,748.620 55 

Other Government Bonds 408.899 00 

Interest accrued 965 85 

Interest outstanding on purchases 1,343 84 

411.208 69 

Municipal debentures 654,722 16 

Interest accrued 1,720 51 

Interest outstanding on purchases 702 74 

657,145 41 

University of Toronto debentures (guaranteed ) 568,978 42 

Toronto Conservatory of Music debentures $244,800 00 

Interest outstanding on purchase 342 34 

■ 245,142 34 

Corporation debentures 34.401 00 

Canadian Pacific Railway and other stocks 77,585 00 

Investments in trust for Banting Research Foundation 711.272 49 

Loan to Athletic Association 65,000 00 

Loan to Hart House 7.000 00 

Accounts Receivable: 

University Press $38 82 

Department of Photography 178 47 

Labour and material 5.818 94 

Central Power Plant 28,221 08 

34,257 31 
Less Royal Ontario Museum balances and miscellaneous items 
at credit 28.780 05 

5.477 26 

Canadian Bank of Commerce, on deposit 441,253 11 

$9,176,850 06 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 177 

Transactions, 1936-37 

Inwards 

Dominion and Provincial Government Bonds $34,539 03 

Municipal debentures 16,875 42 

University of Toronto debentures 34,041 98 

Corporation debentures 147.753 95 

Toronto Conservatory of Music debentures 25.500 00 

Sundry stocks 924.791 37 

Banting Research Foundation Investments 1.424 20 

Withdrawals from Canadian Bank of Commerce 5.263.513 89 

Decrease in accounts outstanding 6,288 22 

Decrease in accrued revenue 480 18 

$6,455,208 24 

Outtvards 

Dominion and Provincial Government Bonds $885,382 09 

Municipal debentures 140,300 26 

Corporation debentures 122,473 95 

Toronto Conservatory of Music debentures 245,300 00 

Sundry stocks 737.291 37 

Banting Research Foundation Investments 190 05 

Deposits in Canadian Bank of Commerce 5,487,700 99 

7,618.638 71 



$1,163,430 47 
Return of 30tli June. 1936 8,013.419 59 



Return of 30th June. 1937 $9,176,850 06 

APPENDIX 1 

Fees, 1936-37 

Balance brought forward. 1935-36 $3,020 00 

Total of fees collected. 1936-37 994^279 40 



$997,299 40 



Distribution thereof : 

Sundry refunds during year $6,119 80 

Share of fees paid to the following: 

Hart House 36.409 25 

Students' Administrative Council 15.292 00 

Medical Society 3.158 00 

Dental Students' Parliament 1.560 00 

Foresters" Club 105 00 

Graduate Students' Union 480 00 

University College Literary and Athletic Society 1.765 00 

Universitv College Women's Undergraduate Association 1.404 00 

Medical Women's Undergraduate Association 122 00 

Teachers' Course Association 1.174 00 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons 1,940 00 

St. Michael's College ( Household Science ) 60 00 

Toronto Conservatory of Music 700 00 

Hospitals: 

Toronto General $9,375 00 

Toronto General (Burnside) 968 00 

$10,343 00 



St. Michael's 1,605 00 

Sick Children's 1,165 00 

Toronto Western 1,135 00 



14.248 00 

Credited to .Sundry Accounts: 

Ontario College of Education 63.383 61 

Universitv College Women's Union 2.001 00 

School of Nursing 14.231 50 

St. George's School for Child Study 2.821 50 

Microscopes Account 22 00 

Laboratory Deposits 22.936 08 

Fees paid in advance for 1937-38 617 00 

Balance to Revenue Account (Schedule 6a) 806.749 66 



$997,299 40 



178 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



179 



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180 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



CLASSIFICATION OF SERVICES 



Gross 
Receipts 



Other Net 

Refunds Deductions Amount 



Tuition, etc.: 

Arts 

Commerce and Finance 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Dentistry- 

Education 

Education (University Schools). . . . 

Forestry 

Music 

Household Science 

Post Graduate 

University Extension 

Social Science 

Pharmacy 

School of Nursing 

St. George's School 

Registration 

Matriculation 

Ad Eundem 

Examinations 

Degrees and Honour Certificates 

Laboratorj' Supplies 

Library 

Physical Education Diploma 

Med. Exam, and Phy. Tr. (Men) 

Med. Exam and Phy. Tr. (Women). . . 

Penalties 

Women's Union 

Women's Undergraduate Association 

University College 

Women's Undergraduate Association 

Medicine 

Hart House 

Students' Administrative Council 

Literary and Athletic Society 

Medical Society 

Dental Students' Parliament 

Foresters' Club 

Graduate Students' Union 

Teachers' Course Association 

M icroscopes 

Laboratory Deposits 



$122,169 30 

22,134 00 

195,816 00, 

163,858 41 

45.509 00 

32,648 50i 

30,789 61' 

4,468 00 

905 00 

5,919 00 

12,991 75 

82,991 00 

7,177 00 

15,278 00 

14.344 00 

2,821 50 

2,793 00 

1,133 00 

660 00 

67,863 25' 

18,497 75 

4,629 75 1 

36,853 00 

502 00 

8,333 00 

1,180 00 

5,586 25 

2,001 00 

1,404 00 



122 00 

36,409 25 

15,292 00 

1,765 00 

3,158 00 

1,560 00 

105 00 

480 00 

1,174 001 

22 OOi 

22,936 08' 



$1,166 30 

49 00 

348 00 

248 50: 

32 00| 

54 50 



110 00 

30 00 

2,518 00 

15 00 

278 00 

112 50 



20 00 

663 00 

210 00 

15 00 

59 00 



40 00 

8 00 

143 00 



14,248 00 



1,940 00 
32,594 00 
30,789 61 



700 00 
60 00 



14,231 50 
2,821 50 



2,001 00 

1,404 00 

122 00 

36,409 25 

15,292 00 

1,765 00 

3,158 00 

1,560 00 

105 00 

480 00 

1,174 00 

22 00 

22,936 08 



$121,003 00 

22,085 00 

181,220 00 

163,609 91 

43,537 00 



4,468 00 
205 00 

5,749 00 
12,961 75 
80,473 00 

7,162 00 
15,000 00 



2,793 00 

1,133 00 

640 00 

67,200 25 

18,287 75 

4,614 75 

36,794 00 

502 00 

8,293 00 

1,172 00 

5,443 25 



$994,279 40 $6,119 80 $183,812 94 $804,346 66 



RECAPITULATION 



University Fees Proper 

University College Fees Proper 

Balance brought forward, 1935-36 


$866,584 60 

127,694 80 

3,020 00 


$4,953 50 
1,166 30 


$183,812 94 


$677,818 16 

126,528 50 

3,020 00 




$997,299 40 


$ 6.119 80 


$183,812 94 


$807,366 66 


Less paid in advance for 1937-38 








617 00 










t806,749 66 













UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



181 



APPENDIX II 
Revenue Expendhures, 1936-37 



Appropriation 



Supple- 
mentar\- 



Unused 



Total 



I. Administration: 

1. Salaries 

2. Pensions and Retiring Allow- 



ances 

3. President's Office 

4. Bursar's Office 

5. Registrar's Office 

6. Superintendent's Office 

7. Convocation and Simcoe Halls , 

8. President's House 



$110,800 00] 

103,700 00| 

800 00 

5,200 00 

5,950 00 

4,700 00 

12,025 00 

100 00 



II. Library: 

9. Salaries 

10. Maintenance. 

11. Building .... 



III. 12. Roval Ontario Museum. 



IV. Athletics, Physical Training, Mili- 
tary Studies, etc.: 

13. Athletics and Physical Train- 

ing — Men 

14. Athletics and Physical Train- 

ing — W omen 

15. Health Service — Men i 

16. Health Service — Women 

17. Military Studies , 

18. Hart House (share of mainten-j 
ance) 

19. Women's Building (44 Hoskin 
Avenue) 

20. Military Studies Building. . . .' 



V. 



Faculty of Arts: 

21. Salaries 

22. Mathematics 

23. Applied Mathematics 

24. Physics 

25. Astronomy 

26. Geology 

27. Mineralogy 

28. Chemistry 

29. Biologv 

30. Botany 

31. History 

32. Anthropology 

33. Archaeology 

34. Fine Art . 

35. Geography 

36. Political Economy. . . 

37. Philosophy 

38. Psychology 

39. Italian and Spanish. . 

40. University College 

ments 

University College 

Expenses 

University College Building 
McLennan Laborator\' 
(Physics) 

44. Chemical Building 

45. Biological Building 

46. Botany Building 



$243,275 00 



$58,270 00 

52,200 00 

5,070 00 



$115,540 00 



$73,367 00 i 



17,610 OOj 

6,600 00 
8,250 001 
4,750 00 I 
3,580 OOi 

9,500 00 

1,145 00 
1,350 00 



$52,785 00 



Depart- 



41. 

42. 
43. 



General 



$741,260 OOi 

650 00| 

800 001 

9,750 00 

3,100 OOi 

1,300 001 

1,000 00 

8,350 00 

5,540 OOi 

6,300 00, 

1,100 00; 

25 00 

400 00! 

1,600 oo: 

450 00 
2,500 00 

150 00 
3,925 00 

225 00 

600 00 

1,600 00 
11,875 00 

6,175 00 
4,150 00 
5,425 00 
6,225 00 



50 52 



$2,303 26i $108,496 74 

2,344 58 101,355 42 

I 850 52 

4,784 00 

5,150 89 

3.506 88 

10,203 03 

100 00 



416 OOt 

799 ll' 
1,193 12 
1,821 97 



50 52 



392 92 



5,878 04[ $234,447 48 



$991 72; $57,278 28 

52,592 92 

318 29 4,751 71 



$392 92 



1,310 01, $114,622 91 



44 $73,366 56 



294 01,. 



$294 01 



1,903 82 

297 41 

328 59 

110 62 

58 57 



433 80 
121 92 



15,706 18 

6,302 59 
7,921 41 
4,639 38 
3,521 43 

9,794 01 

711 20 
1,228 08 



$3,254 73 $49,824 28 



47 88 



1 51 

26 95 

106 13 



36 03 



$19,333 27 

450 79 

8 51 

1,145 85 

440 47 

141 78 

499 37 

1,470 10 

164 45 



20 41 
13 96 



68 68 

62 84 

180 78 

11 14; 

233 75 



707 92 

312 53 
407 16 

182 42 
531 86 



$721,926 73 


199 


21 


791 


49 


8,604 


15 


2,6.59 


53 


1,158 


22 


500 


63 


6,879 90 


5,375 


55 


6,347 


88 


1,079 


59 


11 


04 


401 


51 


1,626 


95 


556 


13 


2.431 


32 


87 


16 


3,744 


22 


213 


86 


366 


25 


1,636 


03 


11,167 08 


5,862 47 


3,742 


84 


5,242 


58 


5,693 


14 



182 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Revenue Expenditures, 1936-37 — Continued 





Appropriation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Total 


47. Baldwin House (History) .... 

48. No 43 St George St 


S 2,905 00 
1,055 00 




$ 260 06 
219 97 
296 08 

542 68 

1,018 55" 

344 45 


$ 2,644 94 




835 03 


49 No 45 St George St. (Law) 


2 1 fin on 




1,863 92 


50. No. 47 St. George St. (Appliedj 

Mathematics) 1 170 00 




627 32 


51. Economics Building 


9,950 00 


206 21 


10,156 21 


52. Psychology Building 

53. David Dunlap Observatory . . . 


3,690 00 
4,000 00 


2,671 45 
3,655 55 




$849,405 00 


$ 424 71 


$29,069 83 


$820,759 88 





Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Eaton, 
Rockefeller 
and Wall- 
berg Funds 


Total 


VI. Faculty of Medicine: 

54. Salaries 


$2.57,210 00 




$4,686 03 


$78,996 96 


$331,520 93 




$ 594 55 


594 55 


55. Anatom\' 


5,600 00 
7,925 00 
2,2.50 00 
2,400 00 

4,700 00 
3,650 00 

2,220 00 


322 33 
971 05 




5,277 67 


56. Pathology and Bacteriology . 

57. Pathological Chemistry 

58. Pharmacy and Pharmacology 

59. Bio-Chemistry (including 
Zymoloev) 






6,953 95 




235 24 
299 98 

49 24 
26 38 

317 36 




2,014 76 






2.100 02 






4,6.50 76 


60. Physiology 






3,623 62 


61. Hygiene and Preventive 




1,902 64 


62. Medicine 




2.505 99 
1,460 88 


2,505 99 


63. Paediatrics 








1,460 88 


64. Surgery 


2,2.50 00 
550 00 
500 00 
250 00 
200 00 
50 00 




1,160 03 
17 06 


1,089 97 


65. Obstetrics and Gynaecology. . 

66. Ophthalmology 






532 94 




496 50 




3 50 


67. Oto-Laryngology 

68. Therapeutics .... 




105 24 

22 04 

23 61 




144 76 






177 96 


69. Psychiatry . . . 




26 39 










71. Radiology 

72. Art Service 


1,000 00 
4,100 00 
4,500 00 
8,850 00 
22,8.50 00 
5,135 00 
9,600 00 








1,000 00 




52 51 

1,435 79 

603 59 

1,015 51 

955 40 

163 90 




4,047 49 


73. General Expenses 






3,064 21 


74. Medical Building 

75. Banting Institute 






8,246 41 




21,834 49 


76. Anatomical Building 

77. Hygiene Building 




4,179 60 




9,436 10 










■ 


$345,790 00 


$ 594 55 


$12.9.58 79$ 82,963 83 


$416,389 59 


VII. School of Hygiene: 

78. Salaries 








$36,310 55 
1,764 87 


$36,310 55 


79. Maintenance 






1,764 87 


















$38,075 42 


$38,075 42 





Appro- 
priation 


Unused 


Eaton. 

Rockefeller 

and Wallberg 

Funds 


Total 


VIII. Faculty of Applied Science: 

80. Salaries 


$269,965 00 
3,100 00 
2,700 00 

5.50 00 


.$7,226 86 
172 67 
772 72 

83 03 




$262,738 14 


81. Electrical Engineering 




2,927 33 


82. Mechanical Engineering 

83. Civil Engineering: 

Municipal and Structural 


1,927 28 


599 40 


1,066 37 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



183 



Revenue Expenditures, 1936-37 — Continued 





Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Eaton, 
Rocke eller 
and Wall- 
:)erg Funds 


Total 


84. Civil Engineering: 
Surveying and Geodesy 

85. Mining Engineering 

86. Metallurgical Engineering. . . 

87. Chemical Engineering and 
Applied Chemistry 

88 School of Architecture . . 


3,398 00 

1,560 00 

425 00 

6,500 00 

905 00 

400 00 

450 00 

3.160 00 

8,200 00 

10,100 00 
5,850 00 

7,425 00 
475 00 




102 89 
64 05 
30 44 

247 58 
120 90 


375 00 

2.578 48 

661 33 

3,403 83 


3,670 11 




4,074 43 




1 055 89 




9,656 25 




784 10 


89. Engineering Drawing 

90 Applied Phvsics .... 


13 03 


413 03 


28 74 
288 39 
229 31 


1.065 40 


1 486 66 


91 General Expenses 




2,871 61 


92. Photographic Service 

93. Mining Building (including 

Mill Building) ... . 






7,970 69 


1,556 44 




11,656 44 


94. Engineering Building 

95. Electrical Building (including 

Mechanical Building and 
W ind Tunnel) 


504 72 

452 89 
118 92 




5,345 28 






6,972 11 


96. Geodetic Observatory Bldg. . 






356 08 




$325,163 00 


$ 1 ,569 47 


$10,444 11 


$8,683 44 


$324,971 80 


IX. Faculty of Dentistry: 

97. Salaries 


$85,217 00 


300 00 


$754 49 




$84,462 51 


97a Po^t Graduate Courses 




300 00 


98. Laboratory and Infirmary 
Supplies etc 


23,000 00 

2,250 00 

13,600 00 


2,643 79 




20,356 21 


99 General Expenses 


3 39 


2,253 39 


100. Dental Building 


1,236 37 




12,363 63 












$124,067 00 


$ 303 39 


$4,634 65 




$119,735 74 


X. Faculty of Household Science: 

101 . Salaries 


$28,650 00 
3,175 00 
1,900 00 
2,000 00 
5,100 00 




$ 532 30 

416 81 

142 57 

98 09 

571 89 




$28,117 70 


102 Household Science 




2,758 19 


103. Food Cheniistr\' 






1,757 43 


104. General Expenses 


1,901 91 


105. Household Science Building 




4,528 11 








$40,825 00 




$1,761 66 




$ 39,063 34 








XI. Faculty of Forestry: 
106. Salaries . 


$22,730 00 
2.250 00 
2,335 00 




$ 395 63 
378 17 
364 08 




$22,334 37 


107. Maintenance 




1,871 83 


108. Forestrv Building 






1,970 92 










$27,315 00 




$1,137 88 




$26,177 12 























Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Eaton, 
Rockefeller 
and Wall- 
berg Funds 


Total 


XII. Faculty of Music: 
109. Salaries . . 


$1,750 00 
300 00 




$ 3 15 
207 56 




$1,746 85 


110. Maintenance 






92 44 












$2,050 00 




$210 71 




$1,839 29 










XIII. School of Graduate Studies: 

111. Salaries 


$3,950 00 
625 00 




$ 51 30 
157 48 




$3,898 70 


112. Maintenance 




467 52 










$4,575 00 




$208 78 




$4,366 22 




. ... 





184 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Revenue Expenditures, 1936-37 — Continued 





Appro- 
priation 


Supple- 
mentary 


Unused 


Eaton, 
Rockfeller 
and Wall- 
berg Funds 


Total 


XIV. School of Nursing: 

113. Salaries 


$22,640 00 

4,700 00 

1,400 00 

11,000 00 

40 J 00 

5,300 00 


1 

1 

r 
1 

j 

i 




43,206 44 




114. Special Teaching 




115. School Maintenance 

116. Residence Maintenance . . . . 

117. Contingency Fund 

118. Building-(No.7Queen'sPark) 


48,206 44 


Proportion chargeable to 
Revenue 


($45,440 00) 
5,000 00 






43,206 44 


48,206 44 






XV. Social Science: 

119. Salaries 


$12,350 00 
850 00 




$ 15 13 
152 95 




$12,334 87 


120. Maintenance 




697 05 










$13,200 00 




$168 08 




$13,031 92 


XVI. 

121. E.xaminations, etc 








$20,500 00 




$1,461 55 




$19,038 45 








XVII. University E.xtension and 
Publicity: 
122. Salaries 


$18,200 00 
49.300 00 




$ 946 37 




$17,253 63 


123. Extension and Publicity 
Depts 


13,417 36 




62,717 36 












$67,500 00 


$ 13.417 36 


$ 946 37 




$79,970 99 


XVIII. Men's Residences: 

124. Maintenance of Building.s. . . 


$16,190 00 




$ 838 53 




$15,351 47 










XIX. Women's Residences and Union: 

125. Maintenance of Buildings. . . 

126. Housekeeping Account 












$ 9,925 00 
58,075 00 




$ ] ,006 89 
6,933 72 




$ 8,918 11 






51,141 28 




$68,000 00 




$ 7,940 61 




$ 60,059 39 










XX. 127. Central Power Plant 


$ 149,500 00 




$14,605 06 




$134,894 94 

















Appro- 
priation 


Supple- Unused 
mentary 


Total 


XXI. Miscellaneous and General: 

128. Central Stores 


$ 4,200 00 

19,300 00 

17,200 00 

13,100 00 

20,000 00 

1,000 00 

3,000 00 

3,200 00 

3,000 00 
600 00 

4,100 00 

3,000 00 

15.000 00 

20,000 00 




$ 284 20 
154 65 
906 28 
1,480 68 
142 89 
476 46 


$ 3,915 80 


129. Grounds. . 




19,145 35 


130. Protective Service 




16,293 72 


131. Telephones 




11,619 32 


132. Insurance 




19,857 11 


133. Law Costs 




523 54 


134. Auditor's Fees 




3,000 00 


135. Travelling E.xpenses 




705 70 
240 21 

632 94 

2,701 97 

5,717 00 

16,959 17 


2,494 30 


136. Receptions to Societies and Uni- 
versity Visitors 




2,759 79 


137. Convocation Expenses 

138. Aid to Publications and Soci- 
eties 


31 


600 31 
3,467 06 


139. Senate Elections 




298 03 


140. Bursaries 




9,283 00 


141. Contingencies 




3,040 83 












$126,700 00 


31 $30,402 15 


$96,298 16 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



185 



XXII. 142. Capital Account Charges. . . . 

XXill. 143. \ Special Research (including 
144. j Banting and Best) 



Appro- 
priation 



$119,653 00 
$27,200 00 



Supple- 
mentarv 



Unused Total 



I $119,653 00 

171 611 $27,028 39 



Recapitulation 



I I Eaton, I 

Appro- ! Supple- I Rockefeller ' 

priation i mentary | Unused 'and Wallberg Total 

Funds 



I. Administration i 

II. Library 

III. Royal'Ontario Mu- 

seum 

IV. Athletics, Physical 

Training. Military 
Studies, etc 

V. Faculty of Arts ... 

VI. Faculty of Medicine.! 

VII. School of Hygiene. . 

VIII. Faculty of Applied 

Science 

IX. Faculty of Dentistry 

X. Faculty of House- 

hold Science 

XI. Faculty of Forestry i 

XII. Faculty of Music. . 

XIII. School of Graduate 

Studies 

XIV. School of Nursing. . 

XV. Social Science 

XVI. Examinations 

XVII. University E.xtension 

and Publicity. ... 

XVIII. Men's Residences., .i 

XIX. Women's Residences 

and Union 

XX. Centra! Power Plant 

XXI. Miscellaneous and 

General 

XXII. Capital Account 

Charges 

XXIII. Special Research (in- 

cluding Banting 
and Best) 



I 243,275 00 
115,540 00 

73,367 00 



52,785 OOl 
849,405 00| 
345,790 00! 



$50 52 
392 92 



294 01 
424 71 
594 5", 



325,163 00 
124,067 00 

40,825 00 

27,315 00 

2,050 00 

4,575 00 

5,000 00 

13,200 00 

20,500 00| 

67,500 Ool 
16,190 00 

68,000 00 
149,500 00 

126,700 00 

119,653 00 



27,200 00 



1,569 47j 
303 39 



13,417 36 



$2,817,600 00 



113,356 35 



31 



$ 17,047 24 



Charged to Revenue 2,704,243 65 

Charged toEaton , Rockefeller 

and Wallberg Funds. . . 172,929 131 

Total expenditure as above. .i$2,877,172 78' 



$ 8,878 04 
1,310 01 

44: 



3,254 73! 

29.069 83i 
12,958 79! 



10,444 11 

4,634 65 

1,761 66 

1,137 88 

210 71 

208 78 



168 08 
1,461 55 

946 37 
838 53 

7,940 61 
14,605 06 

30,402 15 



171 61 



130,403 59 
17,047 24 



113,356 35 



$82,963 83 
38,075 42 

8,683 44i 



43,206 44 



$234,447 48 
114,622 91 

73,366 56 



49,824 28 
820,759 88 
416,389 59 

38,075 42 

324,971 80 
119,735 74 

39,063 34 

26.177 12 

1,839 29 

4,366 22 
48.206 44 
13,031 92 
19,038 45 

79,970 99 
15,351 47 

60,059 39 
134,894 94 

96,298 16 

119,653 00 

27,028 39 



$ 172,929 13 $2,877,172 78 



186 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

I. ADMINISTRATION 

1. Salaries 

(All salaries, except where otherwise stated, are for 12 months to 30 June, 1937. 

The figure following a minus sign after a salary indicates the reduction made in that salary in 
accordance with the schedule in force during the fiscal year 1936-37.) 

President's Office 

Hon. H. J. Cody. LL.D., President, $15,000 — $1,127.50 $13,872 50 

Miss A. W. Patterson, President's Secretary (paid also $246.85 as 

Secretary-. Faculty of Music ) $2,500 — $30.60 2,469 40 



$16,341 90 



Bursar' sOffice 

F. A. Moure. Bursar, $6,500 — $152.50 $6,347 50 

Accounts Branch: 

C. E. Higginbottom. Accountant, $4,100 — $59.50 4.040 50 

J. A. Gair. Assistant. $2,000 — $22.50 1,977 50 

Miss E. Long, Appropriations Ledger Clerk, $1,600 — $17.50 1,582 50 

Miss R. Mahood, Assistant Appropriations Ledger Clerk, $1,050 — 

$10.63 1,039 37 

Clerks : 

Miss J. H. Branton. $1.3.50 — $14.38 1,335 62 

John Prince 1.000 00 

Miss E. Crookshanks 1.000 00 

Miss F. M. Quinlivan 800 00 

Miss V. Whitehead 800 00 

Fees Branch : 

Miss E. B. Goodwin, Chief Clerk, $2,000 — $22.50 1.977 50 

Gordon M. Grant, Cashier, $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

Record Clerks : 

Mrs. Edith M. Hardy, $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

Miss F. J. Rorke 850 00 

Secretarial Branch: 

Miss A. M. Gall. Chief Clerk, $2,050 — $23.25 2.026 75 

Miss M. Burns, Assistant, $1,600 — $17.50 1,582 50 

Miss M. Austin. Pensions Clerk, $1.5.50 — $16.88 1.533 12 

Miss H. Malone, Clerk, $1,050 — S10.63 1,039 37 

Registrar s Office 

A. B. Fennel]. Registrar. $5,000 — $77.50 $4,922 50 

A. T. Laidlaw. Assistant Registrar, $4,100 — $.59.50 4,040 50 

Assistants: 

Miss A. MacGillivray. $1,900 — $21.25 1,878 75 

Miss E. Hargreaves. $1,900 — $21.25 1,878 75 

Miss L E. Eraser, $1,200 — $12.50 1,187 50 

Graduates' Register: 

Miss B. G. Van Allen. $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

Miss M. F. Thompson, $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

Miss Ruth D. Wythe 9.50 00 

Miss J. L. Stephens 900 00 

Miss Margaret E. Smith 7.50 00 

Miss A. S. Meen. S1.650 — $18.12 1.631 88 

Miss M. M. Lavell. $1,050 — $10.63 1,0.39 37 

Miss E. M. Sharpe. Secretary to Registrar, $1,600 — $17.50 1.582 50 

Stenographers : 

Miss E. M. Fasken. $1,400 — $15 1..385 00 

Miss Dorothy Woods 900 00 

Wm. Calladine, Filing Clerk 750 00 



$31,405 98 



$26,566 75 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



187 



Superintendent's Office 

A. D. LePan. Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, $6,500 — 1152.50 $6,347 50 

W. H. Bonus, Assistant Superintendent, $4,400 — $65.50 4.334 50 

Assistants: 

G. D. Maxwell. $3,400 — $45.50 3,354 50 

E. G. Moogk, $2,400 — $28.50 2.371 50 

J. Shortreed. $2,300 — $27 2,273 00 

W. L. D. Carnie, Chief Clerk. $2,300 — $27 2.273 00 

Miss M. D. Chisholm. Stenographer. $1,350 — $14.38 1.335 62 

Miss A. K. Wynn. $1,350 — $14.38 1.335 62 

Miss E. Nicklin. $1,350 — $14.38 1,335 62 

Miss J. Taylor 1.000 00 

Miss R. E. Cannon 950 00 

Miss R. M. Rankin 900 00 

Miss M. E. Lee 850 00 



Miscellaneous 

J. B. Bickersteth. Warden. Hart House (with living valued (Qi $675) 
$4,500 — $67.50 .' $4,432 50 

Leonard Smith, Bedel, also Attendant and Messenger, President's OfiFice, 
$1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 



2. Pensions AND Retiring Allowances 

University's contribution to Pension Funds for the year ending 30 
June, 1937: 

Remitted to Teachers" Insurance and Annuity Association, New 
York, for credit of retiring allowances funded there (original 

contributory plan I 

Credited to Fund No. 2 (Academic, formerly non-contributory plan) 
Credited to Fund No. 3 (Administrative and Clerical Employees) . . 
Sundry annual allowances (voted separately and not chargeable to above 
funds) paid as detailed below: 

Sir Robert Falconer ($10,000 less amount charged to 

Pension Fund No. 2 ) .• $7,600 00 

J. T. Fotheringham 500 00 

A. Primrose. 6 mos. to 1 January — final payment 250 00 

H. H. Langton 400 00 

Mrs. A. C. Jones 600 00 

D. J. Clark 250 00 

Alex. Wilson 725 00 

Widow's allowances: 

Mrs. M. Hope Gillespie 900 00 

Mrs. Christian Lynn 375 00 

Mrs. Ellen L. Sinclair 350 00 



830,872 30 
32.000 00 
26,533 12 



11.950 00 



3. President's Office 

Office supplies, postage, printing and incidentals: 

President H. J. Cody, sundry disbursements 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., transfer cases 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

Llniversity Associates of Canada, encyclopedia 

University Press, printing and stationery 

4. Bursar's Office 

Office supplies, postage, printing and incidentals ($2,618.73) 

Bostitch Ltd., stapler and fasteners 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., maintenance service.., 

Bernard Cairns Ltd., stamps and pads 

Grand & Toy, cheques 

Might Directories Ltd., city directory 



$37 


85 


18 


10 


94 00 


6 00 


24 


00 


670 


57 



$11 50 
51 00 
15 91 

221 00 
21 60 



$28,660 86 



$5,521 25 
$108,496 74 



$101,355 42 



$850 52 



188 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



87 92 
550 00 
58 20 
41 20 
1,278 82 
10 22 


259 05 
12 31 


296 00 
672 00 


1,197 27 



Office Specialty Mfg. Co., folders, stools, transfer cases, shelf, etc.. 

Postage ■ • • 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., maintenance service and paper 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

The Bursar, disbursments: 

Meals for Staff — overtime work, $1.58.50; hire of car for office 
business for one year. $75; exchange on cheques and postal 
notes, $17.19 ; sundries, $8.36 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $12.04; material, 27c - 

Clerical assistance ($968.00) : 

Miss M. E. Kelly, 24-2/3 weeks 

Mrs. I. McCormick, 37 weeks, 2 days 

Stamp taxes and bank service charges 



5. Registrar's Office 

Stationery and office supplies ($1,163.06) : 

Bickerton Multigraphing Co., mimeographing and paper $115 02 

Grand & Toy, transfer cases 25 00 

Hyde's, subscriptions to daily papers 24 00 

Might Directories Ltd., city directory 21 60 

Mimeograph Co., ink and stencils 36 06 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., cards, folders, etc 178 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 16 20 

E. G. Taylor, addressograph inspection 16 35 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., typewriter, $141.75, less allowance 

on old machine, $41.75, and repairs 101 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 569 60 

Accounts under $10 (8) 45 92 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $1.77; labour, $11.27; material, $1.27 14 31 

Clerical assistance ($546.60): 

Miss J. E. G. Brown, 4 weeks 64 00 

Miss A. I. Firth, iy-2 weeks 37 50 

Miss M. Fleury, 2 weeks 30 00 

A. F. B. Goggio, 3 weeks, 2 days 50 00 

F. A. Hare, 4 weeks 80 00 

Mrs. F. P. Lloyd, 87% hours 52 60 

K. M. McQuarrie, 4 weeks • 60 00 

Miss J. E. Woods, IIV2 weeks 172 50 

Postage 1,143 08 

University Press, printing Arts calendar, curricula, etc 2,372 40 

$5,225 14 

Less credits for clerical work, record cards, stencils, etc 74 25 



6. Superintendent's Office 

Office supplies, printing, postage and incidentals ($1,704.67) : 

Brown Bros., ledger sheets and binder 

Bernard Cairns Ltd., rubber stamps and repairs 

McMullin Publishers Ltd., tariff service 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., folders and transfer cases 

Photographic Service, blue prints 

Postage 

Remington-Rand Ltd., typewriter, $127.58, less allowance on old 
machine, $35; Kardex cabinet and adding machine inspection... 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection and carbon 

Superintendent's travelling expenses re inspection of Survey Camp. . 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (17) 

.Sundry disbursements: 

Telegrams, etc., $37.51; car license, $12; sundries. $8.28 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $2.64; labour, $7.95; material, 

.$72.79 

Incidental expenses re work on buildings: 

Labour, $276.43 ; material, $30.21 

Drafting assistance: 

H. Stevenson, 47 weeks, Wi days 



$66 73 
12 57 
25 00 
37 27 
39 89 

279 00 


191 33 
95 60 

14 75 

730 47 

70 89 


57 79 


83 38 


306 64 


1,075 46 



$4,784 00 



$5,150 89 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 189 

Clerical assistance ( $482.01 ) : 

Miss H. E. Bredin, 6 days 13 50 

Miss M. Lackie. 1 day 2 50 

Miss M. R. LeGrow. 11 weeks 148 50 

Miss M. Morris, 3 weeks, 1 day 42 76 

D. Sherwood, 1 days 2 25 

Miss M. G. Sonley, 18 weeks, 1 day 272 50 

$3,568 78 

Less credit for Customs entry fees 61 90 

■ $3,506 88 

7. CoNvocATIO^f Hall and Simcoe Hall 

Heat and light $3,866 21 

Gas, $59.76; water, $67.45 127 21 

Caretaker's supplies : 

Superintendent's Dept., material 474 46 

Cleaning ($4,683.67) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 14 70 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 30 20 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 5 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 4.633 77 

Repairs and renewals ( $1,960.54) : 

T. Eaton Co., rug 69 00 

Parsons-Steiner Ltd., dishes 43 92 

Patterson & Heward, inscription plate 19 98 

Provincial Treasurer, public hall license 10 00 

Roberts & Sons, frames 16 00 

Routery Bros., plates 17 20 

Accounts under $10 (4) 12 33 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,366 45: material. $405.66 1.772 11 

Acting Postmaster and Chief Messenger, H. R. Cheney. 12 mos., $1,350 

— $14.38 1.335 62 

Messenger and Post Office service ($1,767.30) : 

Miss M. Bradshaw, Clerk, 3 mos 221 00 

Messengers (fi $8.50 to $14 per week: 

J. Monkhouse, 52 weeks 644 00 

W. Sherman. 45y2 weeks 387 01 

R. Wilson, 32 weeks, 1 day 310 34 

J. R. Wilson. 1611' weeks 140 25 

S. Brown, 14 days 19 86 

L. Smith, 2 days 2 84 

Carfares 42 00 

$14,215 01 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant... $3,866 21 

Credit for cleaning 145 77 

4.011 98 



8. President's House 
Repairs and Renewals: 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $70.13: material, $29.87 $100 00 



H. LIBRARY 

9 Salaries 

W. S. Wallace. Librarian (oai'l also $346.50 in Ontario College of 

Education I $5,400 — $92.75 . . . $5,307 25 

Miss H. G. B. Woolrvche, Assistant Librarian (oaid also $50 in Ontario 

College of Educat ion t $2,400 — $28.50 ' 2.371 50 

Miss A. H. Young. Reference Librarian. $2,000 — $22..50 1.977 50 

Heads of Departments: 

Miss M. L. Newton (Circulation — oaid also $25 in Ontario College 

of Education ) $2,200 ~ $25..50. . .' 2.174 50 

Miss E. V. B»thiine (Cataloguing! .$2,100 — $24 2.076 00 

Miss A. M. C»rdin£rlev (Periodical — paid also $15 from Lniversity 

Press » $1,800 — $20 1.780 00 



$10,203 03 



$100 00 
$234,447 4S 



190 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Assistants : 



Miss A. E. Stennett. $1.750 — S19.38. . 

Miss E. Creighton. $1.700— $18.75 

Miss J. Jarvis. $1,650 — $18.12 

Miss E. Aldridge. S1.600 — $17.50 

Miss M. H. Skinner. $1,550 — $16.88. . 

Miss J. Rathbun. $1,500 — $16.25 

Miss D. Dignum. S1.400 — $15.00 

Miss A. Leonard. $1,400 — $15.00 

Miss I. Trowern. $1,400 — $15.00 

Miss M. L. Hewitt. $1.400 — $15.00. . . 

Miss G. Williams. $1,350 — $14.38 

Miss V. A. Tavlnr. $1,300 — $13.75. .. . 

.Miss K. Ball. $1,300 — $13.75 

Miss I. C. Hill. $1,300 — $13.75 

Miss Doris Shiell. $1,300 — $13.75 

Miss M. Robinson. $1,250 — $13.12. .. . 

Miss D. Tod. $] .250 — $13.12 

Miss Edith Cook. $1.2.50 — $13.12 

Miss K. Wales. $1,250 — $13.12 

Miss H. C. Wrightman. $1,200 — $12.50 
Miss Sheila Tisdall. $1,200 — $12.50. . . 
Miss Ruth Haldenhv. $1,200 — $12.50. . 
Miss Margaret Hall. $1,200 — 812.50.. 
Miss F. E. Bertram. $1,200 — $12.50. . . 
Miss Joan Kmnvlton. $1,200 — $12.50. . 

Miss M. Buchan < part time i 

Assistants (incomplete year i : 
At $1,300 per annum: 
Mis? D. Harding, 
At $1,250 per annum: 

Miss P. Eraser. 9 mos. from 1 July. $937.50 — $9.84 

Miss E. Ashcroft, 1 month. $104.17 — $1.09 

Miss Edith L. Alexander. 11 mos. from 1 August^ $1,145.83 

— $12.03 

At $1,200 per annum : 

Miss D. Pringle. 3 mos. from 1 July. $300 — $3.12 

Miss J. MacBeth. 9 mos. from 1 October (paid also $157.50 

as Occasional Assistant ) $900 — $9.38 

Miss M. Thompson, 5 mos. from 1 Februarv (paid also 

$391.94 as Occasional Assistant ) $.500 — $5.20 

Patterson, Attendant (with rooms, heat and light valued at 
Caretaker of building — paid also $115 for night work) 
$11.88 



mos. from 1 July, $758.33 — $8.02 . 



James j^ 
$420 i 
$1,150 

Wm. Glidden, Messenger. 33 weeks. 2 days, at $9 per week. 
Stackmen: 

Arthur Taylor 

Stanley .South 



1,730 62 
1,681 25 
1.631 88 
1,582 50 
1,533 12 
1,483 75 
1,385 00 
1..385 00 
1.385 00 
1,385 00 
1,335 62 
1,286 25 
1,286 25 
1,286 25 
1.286 25 
1,236 88 
1,236 88 
1.236 88 
1.236 88 
1,187 .50 
1.187 50 
1.187 50 
1,187 50 
1,187 50 
1,187 50 
500 00 



750 31 

927 66 
103 08 

1,133 80 

296 88 

890 62 

494 80 



1,138 12 
300 00 

720 00 
600 00 



$57,278 28 



10. Library Maintenance 

General Library Appropriation (Current Account ) : 
Books and periodicals ($33.445.67 ) : 

Edw. G. Allen & Son $4,217 01 

Thos. Allen 114 08 

American Chemical Society 68 73 

American Dental Association 76 70 

American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers 28 04 

American Institute of Physics 33 96 

American Journal of Physiology 27 15 

American Library Association 106 03 

American Medical Association 92 34 

American Society for Metals 32 60 

American Society for Testing Materials . 91 22 

D. Appleton Centurv Co 57 19 

Baker & Taylor Co.! 1,844 41 

Baker Voohis Co 44 53 

Bibliographical Society of America 53 04 

B. H. Blackwell Co 136 55 

A. Bonnier Publishing Co 164 86 

R. R. Bowker 104 85 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 19L 

Braus-Riggenbach 67 07 

Brick Row Book Shop 68 17 

E. J. Brill Ltd 96 65 

F. A. Brockhaus 7,099 17 

Burroughs & Co 26 50 

Butterworth & Co 68 10 

Cambridge University Press 143 60 

Fred Harper Campbell 452 31 

Canada Law Book 42 50 

Carswell & Co 148 40 

Honore Champion 1,682 11 

Clarke, Irwin & Co 354 92 

Copp. Clark Co 29 66 

Dawson Subscription Service 202 00 

J. M. Dent & Sons 29 09 

Doubleday, Doran & Gundy Ltd 32 80 

G. Ducharme 114 08 

Engineering Index, Inc 50 33 

F. W. Faxon Co 591 52 

Gustav Fock 168 92 

Gaulon & Fils 68 77 

Gauthier-Villars et Cie 61 52 

Paul Geuthner 65 17 

John Grant 41 28 

Grolier Society Ltd 120 00 

E. A. Grove 26 33 

Walter de Gruyter & Co 103 24 

Gurney & Jackson 45 88 

Otto Harrassowitz 38 42 

Hirschwaldsche Buchhandlung 150 62 

Ulrico Hoepli 45 56 

Johns Hopkins Press 60 54 

International Books, Ltd 117 10 

International Labour Office 40 28 

Journal Press 36 29 

Henry Lamertin 38 26 

Otto Lange 1,166 15 

Library Association 39 72 

Library of Congress 41 43 

J. B. Lippincott Co 38 94 

B. Logan & Son 157 01 

Longmans, Green & Co 272 77 

Mc Ainsh & Co 84 28 

McGraw-Hill Book Co 466 10 

Geo. J. McLeod, Ltd 55 12 

MacMillan Co L152 53 

Modern Language Association of America 38 12 

C. V. Mosby & Co 36 40 

Musson Book Co 75 13 

Thos. Nelson & Sons, Ltd 259 62 

New York Times Index 203 96 

N. V. Martinus Nijhoff 384 44 

A. Nizet & M. Bastard 382 79 

Leo S. Olochi 41 79 

Oxford University Press 130 12 

Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons 43 57 

Psychological Review Co 28 32 

Garcia Rico y Cie 34 08 

E. Robinson 75 50 

Ryerson Press 185 85 

S. J. R. Saunders 121 05 

Leonard Scott Publishing Co 25 68 

Chas. Scribner's Sons 46 91 

B. Seeber 57 35 

Simpkin. Marshall Ltd 1,565 25 

Clarence O. Simpson 50 27 

Society of Chemiral Industry 27 11 

G. E. Stechert & Co 77 63 

Superintendent of Documents, Washington 75 32 

N. V. Swetz & Zeitlinger 977 32 

Chas. C. Thomas 31 69 

John Tiranti & Co 110 69 



192 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Trans Canada Press 

Trustees, British Museum 

University Associates of Canada 

University Book Service 

University of Chicago Press 

University of London, Cortauld Institute 

Universum Book Export Co 

West Publishing Co 

John Wiley & Sons 

Williams & Wilkins Co 

H. W. Wilson Co 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy & Biology 

S. A. Nicola Zanichelli 

University Press 

Accounts under $25 ( 398 i 

General Expenses ( $11,689.71 ( : 

Copeland-Chatterson Ltd.. paper 

Library of Congress, cards 

Lowe-Martin Co.. book packets and cards 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. cabinets, files, trucks, etc 

Photographic Service, rectigraphs 

Postage 

Remington. Rand. Ltd., typewriter, $133.65. less allowance on old 

machine. $33.65 ; cabinet, cards, etc 

Robbins & Townsend. type\NTiter inspection 

L. C. Smith & Corona Typewriter Co., typewriters 

University Press, binding, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $25 (11 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $417.72; labour. $88.72; material, 

$47.44 '. 

Less sale of duplicates, $40.50; replacement of books lost by 
departments. $124.57 

Of which charged to sundry funds as follows: 

Carnegie Library, University College $605 54 

Dental. Harrv R. Abbott 477 32 

John Squair Fund No. 2 110 68 

King Alfred Millenary 512 88 

Phillips Stewart Bequest 64 06 

Psychology Fund 62 46 



Transactions by Librarian : 

Balance in his hands. 1 July. 1933. $73.66; credited 
from fines. $693.70: replacement of books lost, 

$107.75 : graduates, deposits. $873.84 $1,748 95 

Deposits refunded. $561.50; miscellaneous. $5.43; 
left in Librarian's hands to be accounted for. 
$169.68 .' 736 61 

$1,012 34 
Transferred to Trust Funds (Schedule 3) balance 

of graduates" deposits. . , 312 34 

Credited to this account 

Assistance: 

At $80 per month: 

Miss F. English, 12 mos 

Miss K. Fisher, 9 mos 

Miss J. Keys, 6% mos 

Miss J. Tenor, 5 mos.. 28 days 

At $60 to $75 per month : 

Miss E. Fleury, 10 mos.. 29 days 

Miss B. Heighington. 5 mos.. 44 days 

Miss M. Slater. 8 mos.. 13 days 

Miss E. Wilson. 7 mos.. 21 days 

Miss Sheila Bell, 7 mos., 10 days 



25 00 


76 23 


107 25 


63 35 


168 04 


93 23 


185 64 


25 18 


229 43 


143 01 


232 68 


108 15 


66 37 


1,061 46 


2,480 19 


35 75 


46 63 


396 66 


622 68 


30 20 


477 63 


468 25 


108 70 


227 30 


8.617 84 


104 19 



553 88 



,135 38 
165 07 



$44,970 31 



1.832 94 



$43,137 37 



700 00 



$42,437 37 

$960 00 
720 00 
520 00 

472 25 


740 81 
649 40 
610 43 
576 22 
546 95 



r.MVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



193 



Miss M. Rose. 7 mos., 10 days 546 95 

Miss J. Arnolil. 7 mos., 3 days 425 80 

Miss M. Thompson. 5 mos.. 7 days 391 94 

Miss E. Wagner. 4 mos., 18 davs 328 72 

Miss E. Killam. 4 mos.. 10 days 324 20 

Miss H. Bailie. 3 mos., 11 days 254 12 

Miss G. Gedeonoff. 3 mos.. 2 days 214 52 

Miss J. McBeth, 2 mos., 3 days 157 50 

Miss R. Skinner. 31 days 60 20 

Miss M. Oxford, 1 month 60 00 

Miss E. Baker. 2 weeks 34 00 

Miss B. Caldwell, 2 weeks 34 00 

A. distance, 4 days 7 70 

Miss M. Sclater. 2 days 3 87 

At $35 to $50 per month : 

Miss M. Clarke. 10 mos.. 23 days 537 10 

Miss M. Clarkson, 2 mos 100 00 

Miss M. Gibbons. iVa mos., 25 hours 70 68 

Miss E. Kelly. 1 month, 15 days 51 93 

At 25c to 75c per hour: 

Wm. Prest, 280 hours 70 00 

Miss A. Carsrallen. 76 hours 38 00 

Miss E. Slimming. 76 hours 38 00 

Miss S. Young. 52 hours 26 00 

Miss D. Troyer. 51 hours 25 50 

Miss E. Gordon, 96 hours 24 00 

$9,620 79 

Less credits 510 46 

$9,110.33 charged as follows: 

Occasional assistance, including opening Library in evenings 

Special grant for re-classification 

Alterations and fixtures ($1,045.22) : 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. steel shelving $708 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. «72.52; material. $264.70 337 22 



11. Library Building 

Heat and lisht $2,740 28 

Gas, $54.48; water. $97.88 152 36 

Caretaker's supplies 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 3~5 25 

Cleaning ($2,070.18) : 

Advance Window Cleaning 42 14 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 14 64 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 2.013 40 

Repairs and renewals ($2,163.17) : 

Johnson Temperature Regulating System, heating system repairs.... 27 53 

Otis-Fensom Elevator Co.. repairs 101 00 

Routerv Bros., plaster repairs 68 00 

Robt. Simpson Co.. linoleum repairs 16 50 

Accounts under $10 (3) 12 47 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,298.74: material. $638.93 1.937 67 

Caretaker, with living quarters valued at $420 (paid from salaries as 

Library Attendant ( 

$7,501 24 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . . $2,740 28 

Sundry credits 9 25 

^ 2.749 53 



6.410 53 
2,699 80 



1.045 22 



$52,592 92 



$4,751 71 



$114j622 91 



194 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



III. 12. ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEUM 

University's share of maintenance advanced to the Trustees of the Royal Ontario 

Museum under R. S. 0. 1927, cap. 343 $73,366 56 



IV. ATHLETICS, PHYSICAL TRAINING, MILITARY STUDIES, ETC. 

13. Athletics and Physical Training — Men 

(a) Salaries: 

T. a. Reed, Secretary, Athletic Directorate, $5,500 — $90 $5,410 00 

Gymnasium Instructors: 

W. H. Martin, also Supervisor of Compulsory Physical Training, 

10 mos., $2,700 — $33 2,667 00 

J. E. McCtitcheon, also Supervisor of Interfaculty Activities, 

10 mos., $2,600 — $31.50 2,568 50 

C. Zwygard, 6 mos 1,000 00 

W. W. Winterburn, Swimming Instructor, 10 mos., $2,600 — 131.50. . 2,.568 50 

Part-time Irstructors (Sessional) : 

H. Phillips. Gymnasium and Indoor Track 400 00 

L. W. Black..] 225 00 

C. Chilcott. . . I . 225 00 

M. Glionna . . l' honoraria 200 00 

T. Matsumotol 25 00 

Locker Attendants: 

W. Rimmer. Chief Locker and Attendance Clerk, $2,000 — 

$22.50 1,977 50 

C. Carruthers, SVj mos 850 00 

D. W. Robertson, 7 mos 455 00 

G. Keach, 33 weeks ra $15 495 00 

Marcus Long, 26 weeks C' $15 390 00 

Clerical Assistant : 

Mrs. B. A. L'A venture, 4 mos. to 31 Dec. '^ $75 .300 00 

Miss K. Boyd, 1 month <a $50, 6 mos. from 1 Jan. (q: $75 500 00 

$20,256 50 

Less Secretary's salary charged to Athletic Association 5,410 00 

(b) Maintenance of Department : 
Attendance records, card system * $109,68) : 

D. Gestetner, Ltd.. share of duplicating machine, $50 (balance 

paid by Athletic Association) ; sentcils, etc $62 08 

L niversity Press, printing and stationery 37 13 

Accounts under $10 (2) 10 47 

Gymnastic appliances and repairs to equipment (750) : 

American Tent & Awning Co., repairing mat covers 21 90 

Gurney Scale Co., scales 52 f^O 

Hart House, one half cost of painting lines on gymnasium floor 14 02 

Harold B. Kennedy, baseketballs 28 00 

Scythes & Co., boxing ring mat, etc 149 95 

Wm. Small, repairing gymnasium mats 14 40 

Toronto Radio & Sports Co., boxing and fencing gloves, balls, 

bats, etc 151 40 

John T. Walters, repairs to fencing equipment 11 75 

Harold A. Wilson, balls, nets, fencing equipment, etc 249 89 

Accounts under $10 < 2 ) 7 16 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $37,65; material, $11.88 49 53 



(a) 



14. Athletics and Physical Training — Women 
Salaries: 

Miss I. G. Coventry, Physical Director. $2,000 — $22.50 $1,977 50 

Miss J. M. Forster, Assistant Phvsical Director, 8 mos., (paid also 

$200 for Extension Work) $1,300 — $13.75. 1,286 25 

Instructors in Swimming: 

Miss A. Cochrane, 7 mos. (paid also $200 for Extension Work) 

$1,200 — $12..50 1.187 50 

A. L. Cochrane, Assistant, 7 mos 300 00 



$14,846 50 



859 68 



$15,706 18 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



195 



Mrs. Margaret Graham, Clerical and Gymnasiium Assistant, 8 mos. 
(paid also $50 in Diploma Course; $222.50 as Pianist; $137 in 
Ontario College of Education, and $25 for Extension Work* 

Miss A. E. M. Parkes, Secretary-Treasurer, Women's Athletic 
Directorate (Sessional — paid also $901.60 by Students" Adminis- 
trative Council » $350 — $4.15 

( b ) Maintenance of Department : 
Sundry expenses ($439.84) : 

A. B. C. Cleaners, making fencing jackets 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

Miss I. G. Coventry, piano rental 

Mrs. Margaret Graham, pianist, 222 M; hours 

Mrs. A. Mawson, laundry 

Harold A. Wilson, balls, foils, masks, etc 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1.90; material. $63 

Janitor service at night classes, A. J. Maycock 

Less credit for towel service at swimming pool 

(c) Course for Diploma in Physical Education: 
Honoraria to Instructors: 

Dr. H. D. Ball, Anatomy (see also Anatomy ) 

Miss K. McMurrich, Anatomy and Kinesiology i see also 

Anatomy ) 

D. Y. Solandt, Physiology ^see also Physiology ) 

Mrs. Margaret Graham, Music and Rhythm 'see also above) . . . 
Mrs. F. Leslie Jones, Voice Training 



300 00 


345 85 


$24 00 


29 24 


42 00 


222 50 


1 00 


29 39 


26 81 


64 90 


56 25 



$496 09 
70 60 



$150 00 

150 00 

100 00 

50 00 

30 00 



15. Health Servce — Men 

(a) Salaries: 

G. D. Porter, Director. $5,2.50 - $83.75 $5,166 25 

J. M. Thomas. Office Assistant, 8 mos 1.000 00 

(b) Maintenance of Department : 
Examining Physians, etc. ($1,140 I : 

Noble Black $100 00 

A. H. W. Caufield 10 00 

T. A. Crowther 100 00 

C. B. Farrar 100 00 

Frank Hassard 100 00 

Ross Jamieson 10 00 

A. G. McPhedran 200 00 

S. J. Magwond 100 00 

John Oille 10 00 

Frank Park 100 00 

D. E. Robertson 10 00 

W. E. L. Sparks 100 00 

Addison Tavlor 100 00 

G. Wright Young 100 00 

Surgif-al Assistance and Equipment: 

I'niversity of Toronto Athletic Association, university's share of 

medical services 400 00 

Medical and office supplies and printing, including X-Rav examina- 
tions ($215.16) : 

J. F. Hartz. medical supplips 95 22 

Toronto General Hospital. X-Rays 33 60 

Toronto Western Hospital, X-Rays 40 00 

I niversity Press, printing and stationerv 22 15 

Accounts under $10 (3) '. 21 94 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1.20; material. $1.05 2 25 



$5,397 10 



425 49 



480 00 



$6,302 59 



5,166 25 



1,755 16 



$7,921 41 



196 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



16. Health Service — Women 

(a) Salaries: 

Dr. Edith H. Gordon. Medical Adviser (paid also $49 for Extension 

Work) $3,400 — $45.50 $3,354 50 

Miss M. Jackes, Office Assistant, 8 mos., $1,100 — $11.25 1,088 75 

(b ) Maintenance of Department : 

Expenses of Medical Office and examining room, including con- 
sultants. X-Rav, etc.: 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry $17 54 

T. Eaton Co.. shades 12 19 

Ingram & Bell, medical supplies 90 12 

Women's College Hospital, X-Rays 13 00 

I niversity Press, printing and stationery 42 86 

Accounts under $10 ( 6 ) 20 42 

17. Military Studies 
(a) Salaries: 

Brig.-Gen. G. S. Cartwright, Director, $2..500 — $30 (retired 30 June) $2,470 00 
W. A. Baughurst, Assistant, 10 mos 980 00 

( b t Maintenance of Department : 
Office and general expenses: 

Roneo Co., stencils and paper 15 84 

' I'niversity Press, printing and stationery 23 86 

Accounts under $10 ( 5 ) 18 42 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $8.93; material. $4.38 13 31 

18. Hart House — Share of Maintenance 

Heat and light $17,698 66 

Cleanings, etc., of Gvmnasium Wing: 

Comptroller. Hart House 4.000 00 

Repairs and renewals ($5,794.01 » : 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 15 00 

New York Window Cleaning Co 3 50 

Routerv Bros., plaster repairs 190 90 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $4,134.36; material. $1.450.25 5,584 61 

$27,492 67 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 17,698 65 

19. Women's Building — 44 Hosk'n Avenue 
Maintenance: 

Fuel ( $215.89 >: 

Central Coal Co $214 14 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $1.25; material, 50c 1 75 

Gas, $12.24; electric current. $58.97; water. $8.72 79 93 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 20 33 

Cleaning and furnaceman ($343.17) ; 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 9 73 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 333 44 

Repairs and renewals; 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $43.66; material. $8.22 51 88 

20. MiLTARY Studies Building 
Maintenance; 

Light $130 00 

Fuel ($445.57): 

Central Coal Co 444 48 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1 09 

Gas. $17.20: water. $15.55 32 75 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 48 64 

Cleaning ($304.01): 

New York WI"di>w Cleaning Co 4 00 

.'superintendent's Dept., labour 300 01 



$4,443 25 



196 13 



$4,639 38 



$3,450 00 



71 43 
$3,521 43 



$9,794 01 



$711 20 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



197 



Repairs and renewals < S397.ll t : 

Art Window Shade Co.. shades. 
Superintendent's Dept., labour. 



J31.45; material, $60.71. 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant. 



4 95 
392 16 




$1,358 08 
130 00 


$1,228 08 




$49,824 28 



V. FACULTY OF ARTS 

21. Salaries 

n> Departments in I niversity of Toronto ($566,077.01) 

Dean's Office 

S. Beatty, Dean (paid also $5,371 as Professor and $490 for Extension 
Work) $1,000 — $23.50 $976 50 

Mathematics 

Professors : 

S. Beatty (see also above ) $5,500 — $129 $5,371 00 

I. R. Pounder ( paid also $460 for Extension Work and $10 re 
Senate Elections » $4,.500 — $67.50 4.432 50 

Associate Professors : 

W. J. Webber. $4,000 — $57.50 3,942 50 

N. E. Sheppard, $3,800 — $53.50 3.746 50 

Assistant Professors : 

D. A. F. Robinson (paid also $490 for Extension Work) $3.3.50 — 

$44.50 3,305 50 

J. D. Burk, $2,600 — $31.50 2.568 50 

G. deB. Robinson (paid also $300 for Extension Work) $2,600 — 

$31.50 2,568 50 

Richard Brauer. $2,600 — $31.50 2.568 50 

H. S. M. Coxeter, $2,600 — $31.50 2.568 50 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Miss C. Krieger. $2,050 — $23.25 2.026 75 

Miss M. E. G. Waddell, $1,9.50 — $21.88 1,928 12 

Fellows (Sessional) : 

F. M. C. Goodspeed 700 00 

W. L. Halperin 700 00 

S. A. Jennines 700 00 

J. Maurice Kingston 700 00 

J. Carson Mark 700 00 

D. C. Murdoch too 00 

C. J. Nesbitt 700 00 

Henry C. Unruh 700 00 

Applied Mathematics 

J. L. Svnge. Professor. $6,000 — $102..50 $5,897 50 

A. F. C. Stevenson. Associate Professor. $3,600 — $49..50 3.5.50 .50 

B. A. Griffith. Lecturer (^ Sessional ) $1,950 — $21.88 1.928 12 

Fellows (^ Sessional) : 

George E. Hav 700 00 

W. D. Rannie 700 00 

Physics 
Professors : 

E. F. Burton, also Director of Laboratorv. S5..500 — S;90 $5,410 00 

J. Satterly (paid also $560 for Extension Work) $.5,000 — $77..50 .. . 4.922 .50 

L Gilchrist. $4.3.50 — $64..50 4.285 50 

H. A. McTageart. Associate Professor, $4,200 — $61.-50 4.138 .50 

Assistant Professors : 

D. S. Ainslie. $3,100 — $39..50 3.060 50 

H. J. C. Ireton. $3,100 — $39..50 3.060 .50 

H. Grayson Smith. $3,000 — $37.50 2.962 .50 

C. Barnes. $2,600 — $31..50 2..568 .50 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

J. O. Wilhelm. $2,800 — $,34..50 2.765 50 

M. F. Crawford. $2,400 — $28.50 2.371 50 



•76 .50 



$40,626 87 



$12,776 12 



198 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Lecturers and Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

A. Pitt, $2,250 — S26.25 2,223 75 

Miss E. J. Allin, $2,000 — $22.50 1,977 50 

Miss F. M. Quinlan (paid also $31.40 for laboratory assistance and 

50c for Extension Work ) $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

Special Lecturers (Sessional ) : 

A. B. McLay 300 00 

W. H. Kohl 200 00 

W. E. Jackson 

W. E. K. Middleton 



T D .. I without salarv 

J. Patterson 



Andrew Thomson . . .' 

Bernard Haurwitz, Carnegie Fellow ( paid $2,400 from Special Fund I . . . 
Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

Miss K. M. Crossley, $1,500 — $16.25 

A. Brant 

Sydney Bateson 

G. F. Clark ( paid also $200 for Extension Work) 

R. Richmond 

H. L. Welsh 

Miss M. Annetts ( Michaelmas Term ) 

Assistant Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

E. Bromberg 

A. R. Clark 

Miss A. M. Crutcher 

H. E. Johns 

G. W. C. Tait 

A. H. Woodcock 

A. F. Chisholm, Special Demonstrator (Sessional — without salary).... 
Class Assistants (Sessional) : 

Miss E. Cohen 

Miss M. McKinley 

J. Hillier 

D. B. Scott 

Miss A. T. Reed, Secretary and Class Assistant, $2,000 — $22.50 

Miss B. M. Savage, Clerical Assistant. $1,500 — $16.25 

B. Clark, Mechanician, $2,100 — $24 

Assistant Mechanicians: 

J. Anderson, $1,900 — $21.25 

J. Ward, $1,900 — $21.25 

G. T. Woodward, $1,900 — $21.25 

F. M. Shepherd, 17 Sept. to 30 June Cw $125 per month, $1,183.33 — 
$12.83 

Albert Owen, 10 mos. from 1 Sept. (paid also $177.34 as Laboratory 

Assistant and $20 for Extension Work ) , 

R. H. Chappell, Glass-blower, $2,600 ~ $31.50 

P. Blackman, Laboratory and Lecture Assistant, $1,600 — 17.50... 

Astronomy 

R. K. Young, Professor, also Director of David Dunlap Observatory, 

$4,500 — $67.50 $4,432 50 

F. S. Hogg. Assistant Professor (paid also $212 for Extension Work) 

$2,700 — $33 2,667 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

P. M. Millman (paid also $300 for Extension Work) $1,900 — $21.25 1,878 75 

J. F. Heard (paid also $200 for Extension Work) $1,650 — $18.12. . 1,631 88 
Computers: 

Miss R. J. Northcott, $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

Miss F. S. Patterson (paid also $100 for Extension Work ) 800 00 

Mrs. Helen S. Hogg, Research Assistant, 8 mos 300 00 

D. A. McRae, Summer Assistant, 3 mos 225 00 

Miss E. M. Fuller, Secretary and Librarian, $1,100 — $11.25 1,088 75 

Gerald F. Longworth, Night Assistant and Machinist, $1,200 - $12.50. . 1,187 50 











1,4S3 75 


1.000 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


800 00 


700 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


500 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 GO 


1,977 50 


1.483 75 


2,076 00 


1,878 75 


1.878 75 


1,878 75 


1.170 50 


800 00 


2,568 50 


1.582 50 



Geology 
Professors : 

E. S. Moore, Economic Geology (paid also $100 for Summer Field 

Work ) $5,500 — $90 $5,410 00 

A. MacLean (paid also $300 for Extension Work) $4,200 — $61.50. 4.138 50 



$68,609 25 



$15,300 13 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



199 



1,780 00 



Lecturers (Sessional) : 

J. Satterly, $1,800 — $20 

Dr. Madeleine A. Fritz (part time — paid also in Royal Ontario 

Museum ) |750 — $7.50 

V. J. Okulitch, Instructor ( Sessional ) $1,500 — $16.25 

Class Assistants (Sessional) : 

J. E. Armstrong 

M. W. Hartley 

P. A. Chubb 

A. T. Griffis 

H. C. Lane 

V. K. Prest 

Bruce Russell ( resigned 1 Dec ) , 

Douglas Monteith Laboratory Attendant, 9 mos 

Mineralogy 
Professors : 

T. L. Walker, also Director of Laboratory (on leave of absence) 

$6,000 — $102.50 (resigned 30 June) $5,897 .50 

A. L. Parsons, $4,500 — $67.50 4,432 50 

J. Ellis Thomson (paid also $170 for Extension Work) $4,000 — 

$57.5() 3,942 50 

Assistants (Sessional) : 

V. B. Meen (part time — paid also in Royal Ontario Museum; and 

$160 for Extension Work) 1,000 00 

J. M. Baker (resigned 15 Jan.) 218 75 

R. C. Carlisle .500 00 

W. L. Brown, Demonstrator, 2 mos 125 00 

Wm. Wightman, Laboratory Attendant, 8 mos 800 00 



742 50 


1,483 75 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


250 00 


62 50 


675 00 



$152.50 (retired 30 



Chemistry 

Professors : 

W. Lash Miller, Physical Chemistry, $6,500 

June » $6,347 50 

F. B. Kenrick, $5,500 — $90 5,410 00 

Associate Professors : 

J. B. Ferguson, $4,400 — $65.50 4,334 50 

J. T. Burt-Gerrans, $4,400 — $65.50 4,334 50 

L. J. Rogers, $4,400 — $65.50 4,334 50 

W. S. Funnell, $4,200 — $61.50 4.138 50 

W. H. Martin, $4,200 — $61.50 4,138 50 

A. R. Gordon, $4,000 — $57.50 3,942 50 

F. R. Lorriman. $3,600 — $49.50 3,550 50 

F. E. Beamish, Assistant Professor (paid also $420 for Extension Work) 

$2,700 — $33 2,667 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Dr. Helen Stantial. Micro-Analysis. $2,500 — $30 2,470 00 

F. E. W. Wetmore, $2,000 — $22.50 1,977 50 

Assistants ( Sessional ) : 

Miss E. V. Eastcott. $1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

L. H. Cragg (paid also $200 for Extension Work) 799 00 

Allan Janis 799 00 

L. F. King 799 00 

D. J. LeRoy 799 00 

M. Wayman 725 00 

H. J. Bernstein 724 00 

M. Cohen 724 00 

R. N. Meals 724 00 

J. J. Russell (paid also $150 for Extension Work — resigned 

30 April ) 633 .50 

Miss Margaret Scott 724 00 

C. C. Unruh < resigned 31 Jan. ) 362 00 

G. W. Graham, 4 mos 320 00 

F. J. Webb 724 00 

G. M. Chute (resigned 31 Dec. » 243 75 

L. D. Finlayson 6.50 00 

E. C. Forbes 6.50 00 

S. Shankman 6.50 00 

D. L. Turner 6.50 00 

G. A. Stewart, 5 mos 400 00 

C. Marchant ) ., , «.-- ,, ^ . , r ,324 00 

M,^ T r- J J paiii also $4/D each trom Special rund ^r,,, nt\ 

iss C. J. Sanderson ' *^ *^ 324 00 



1.5,792 25 



$16,916 25 



200 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



P. P. Paisley, 1 month 

Miss J. C. Romeyn ( paid $30 from Special Fund ) 

Miss L. Elder ( paid S25 from Special Fund i 

Demonstrators. Electro-Chemistrv < Sessional ) : 

A. H. Heatley. S2,000 — $22.50 

R. S. Soanes 

\^ . A. James 

Laborator>" Assistants: 

R. Fortescue (with rooms, heat and light valued at $420 as caretaker 
of building! $1.150 — 811.88 

W. Banton (paid also $40 for Extension Work) $1,400; Lecture 

Assistant. $200: $1,600 — $17.50 

Laboratory- Attendants ^<i $11 to $14 per week: 

H. Ren%\ ick. 52 weeks. 1 day 

Harold Davis. 41% weeks 

A. K. Kaellgren. 40 V^ weeks 

F. H. Twigg, I53V2 hours ffi 42c 

Biology 
Professors : 

E. M. Walker. Invertebrate Zoology. $5,500 — $90 

W. H. Piersol. Histologv and Embrv'ology, ^/ $5,100, of which half 
charged to Anatomy. $2,550 — $40 

Laurence Irving. Experimental Biology. $4,500 — $67..50 (resigned 
30 June) 

A. G. Huntsman, Marine Biology ( without salary' ) 

Associate Professors: 

A. F. Coventrv, Vertebrate Embryology. $3,950 — $56.50 

J. R. Dvmond. Systematic Zoology. $3,950 — $56.50 

W. H. T. Baillie. Mammalian Anatomv. $3,950 — $56.50 

J. W. MacArthiir. Genetics. $3,950 — $56.50 

E. H. Craigie. Comparative Anatomy and Neurology. $3,600 — $49.50 
Assistant Professors: 

W. J. K. Harkness. Limnobiologv. $3.4.50 — $46.-50 

Dr. Norma H. C. Ford. Human Biology. $3,000 — $37.-50 

F. P. Ide, Lecturer (paid also $420 for Extension Work) $1.800 — $20. . 
Demonstrators ' Sessional ) : 

C. H. D. Clarke (paid also $125 in Hygiene) 

Miss J. Eraser 

R. R. Langford (paid also $600 in Special Research) $900 — $16.25 

E. C. Black 

Assistants < Sessional 1 : 

Miss V. Engelbert 

Miss J. F. L. Hart 

H. Rogers 

J. V. McCutcheon 

G. F. M. Smith 

Miss R. D. C. Martin 

P. Elson (paid also $200 in Special Research ) 

Dr. Kathleen M. Bartlev 

W. B. Stallworthy 

C. C. Brown 

E. A. Cummins- 

J. P. Fleming 

C. I. Junkin 

Miss Frances Harkness 

K. H. Doan 

M. Speirs (paid also $300 in Special Research ) 

W. R. Martin 

V. E. Solman 

Miss K. M. Robertsfin (without salary) 

Technical Assistants: 

A. Quantrill. 11 mos., $1,100 — $11.25 

Thos. Stovell. 12 mos 

Miss A. H. Bell. 9 Mos. (paid also in Royal Ontario Museum) 

Miss M. Sewell, 9 mos. (half time ) 

S. Clare. 4 mos 

E. C. Cross. Museum Assistant (oaid also in Roval Ontario Museum) 

11.650 — $18.12 

W. J. LeRay. Curator of Vivarium. $1,650 — $18.12 

D. G. LeRay, Assistant in Vivarium 'paid also $270 in Special Research) 



75 00 







1.977 50 




824 00 




750 00 




1,138 12 




1.-582 50 




703 67 




456 50 




445 50 




64 47 






$70,191 01 




.$5,410 00 




2,510 00 




4.432 50 




3.893 50 




3.893 50 




3.893 50 




3,893 50 




3.550 50 




3.403 50 




2.962 50 




1.780 00 




900 00 




900 00 




883 75 




800 00 




450 00 




450 00 




400 00 




375 00 




375 00 




3-50 00 




250 00 




200 00 




150 00 




150 00 




1.50 00 




150 00 




150 00 




140 00 




80 00 




50 00 




45 00 




45 00 




1.088 75 




8.50 00 




650 00 




360 00 




200 00 




1,631 88 




1,631 88 




250 00 





UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 201 

A. Wilson, Laboratory Assistant 900 00 

Wm. Smith, Laboratory Attendant 550 00 

Secretarial Assistants: 

Miss H. McCaul (paid also $16 in Geology) SLIOO — $11.25 1.088 75 

Miss M. F. Jarvis, 9 mos 675 00 

Miss Phvllis Foreman. Stenographer and Librarian 1,000 00 

— $57,943 01 

Botany 

Professors : 

R. B. Thomson. Plant Morphology, $5,500 — 190 $5,410 00 

H. S. Jackson, Mycology, S5.200 — $82.50 5.1 17 50 

Associate Professors : 

D. L. Bailev, Plant Pathology (2 3rds timel $3,000 — $37.50 2,%2 50 

G. H. Duff, Plant Physiology I S4.000 — $57..50 3.942 50 

H. B. Sifton, Plant Morphology and OEcology, S4.000 — $57.50 3,942 50 

Assistant Professors: 

Dr. J. Gertrude Wright, $3,000 — $37.50 2.962 50 

T. M. C. Taylor (paid also $468 for Extension Worki $2,700 — $33 2,657 00 

E. C. Beck, Lecturer, 4 mos, to 31 Oct. ''" S2.000 per annum (resigned! 

$666.67 — $7.50 659 17 

W. R. Haddow, Special Lecturer ( Sessional — without salary I 

A. J. v. Lehmann, Senior Demonstrator ( paid also $220.50 in Special 

Research; S1.5()0 — $16.62 1,483 38 

Class Assistants ( Sessional ) : 

A. N. Langford (paid also S117 in Special Research i $1,000— $10.75 989 25 

W. K. W. Baldwin I paid also $150 in Special Research) 525 00 

M. W. Bannan ( paid also $57 in Special Research ) 525 00 

Miss D. F. Forward < naid also S92 in Special Research ) 525 00 

D. H. Hamly I paid also $346.40 in Applied Physics and $378.60 in 

Special Research ) $525 — $5.50 519 50 

D. C. McPherson (paid also $177 in .Special Research) .525 00 

D. F. Putnam i paid also $72 in .Special Research ) 525 00 

Miss A. B. Brodie ( paid also $117 in Special Research ) 500 00 

S. T. B. Losee ( paid also $30 in Special Research ) .500 00 

L. O. Weaver (paid also $180 in Special Research — resigned 31 

March ) '. " 375 00 

P. G. Newell (paid also $50 for Extension Work ) 450 00 

B. B. Hillary ( paid also $37 in Special Research ) 400 00 

Miss E. M. Parr ( paid also $42 in Special Research ) 400 00 

A. J. Skolko ( paid also $57 in Special Research ) 400 00 

C. N. Haldenby (paid also $137 in Special Research and $50 for 
Extension Work) 350 00 

N. W. Radforth (paid also $152 in Special Research and $50 for 

Extension Work) 350 00 

S. A. Simmons (paid also $57 in Special Research and $50 for 

Extension Work) 350 00 

Miss R. P. Biggs (paid also $177 in Special Research and $400 as 

Technical Assistant — see below ) 150 00 

Technical Assistants : 

Miss M. B. Givens. $1,800 — $20 1.780 00 

Miss C. B. Ross, $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

R. F. Cain. $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

Miss R. P. Biggs (see also above ) 400 00 

A. -Simpson. Horticulturist (with living quarters valued ^ .$360> .$2,200 

— .$25..50 2.174 .50 

L. Van Cleemput, Gardener. $1,450 — $15.62 1.434 38 

J. Van Beek, Assistant Gardener. $1,400 — $15 1,385 00 

Clerical Assistants: 

Miss L. Alward. $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

Mrs. M. A. Lent, Wi mos. to 15 Aug. (a $1,400 per annum. $175 — 

$1.88, $173.12 : USYo hrs. T; 70c. $104 277 12 

Miss Hilda Lent. 17 weeks. 4 days. (<~i $21 per week; 6 mos. from 

1 Jan. (fi $1,100 per annum 921 00 

Dr. Kathleen L. Hull. Librarian, $1,200 — $12.50 1.187 50 

P. Krotkov, Herbarium Assistant. $1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

Laboratory Attendants: 

R. Lynn, $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

S. G. Smith 1,000 00 

G. M. Proudfoot (resigned 30 Nov. ) 375 00 

D. S. Hull. 1.296V.. hr«. ^ 40c 518 60 

$55,982 65 



202 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

History 

Professors : 

Chester Martin (paid also $11 from University Press) S5.500— $90 $5,410 00 
R. Flenley (paid also $198 for Extension Work and $1.00 from 
Uuniversitv Press I $4,700 — $71.50 4.628 50 

F. H. Underbill ( paid also $294 for Extension Work and $2.00 from 
University Press I $4,700 — $71.50 4,628 50 

G. W. Brown (paid also $304 for Extension Work and $500 from 
University Press) $4,500 — $67.50 4.432 50 

Assistant Professors: 

G. deT. Glazebrook (paid also $464 for Extension Work and $6.75 

from University Press ) $3,450 — $46.50 3,403 50 

D. G. Creighton (paid also $562 for Extension Work) $2,700 — $33 2,667 00 

Edgar Mclnnis (paid also $7.54 for Extension Work and $12.50 from 

University Press ) $2,600 — $31.50 2,568 50 

D. J. McDougall (paid also $344 for Extension Work) $2,600 — 

$31.50 2.568 50 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

R. M. Saunders (paid also $894 for Extension Work) $2,200 — 

$2.5.50 2,174 50 

R. A. Preston. $2,000 — $22.50 1,977 50 

N. F. Langford, Reader ( Sessional i 250 00 

R. G. Riddell. Tutorial Assistant ( Sessional — without salary ) 

$34,709 00 



Anthropology 

T. F. Mcllwraith. Professor (paid also $15 from University Press) 

S4..500 — $67..50 $4,432 50 

C. W. M. Hart, Assistant Professor, also Supervisor of Studies for Course 
in Sociology (paid also $200 for Extension Work and $1.00 from 
University Press) $2,700 — $33 2.667 00 

S. Delbert Clark, Assistant (paid also $430 for Extension Work) 400 00 



$7,499 50 



Archaeology 

C. T. Currellv. Professor (part time — paid also in Royal Ontario 

Museum ) $4,500 — $67.50 $4,432 50 

Rt. Rev. W. C. White. Associate Professor Arrhaeologv (Chinese — paid 

also in Rnval Ouiario Museum ) $2,500 — .$30 .' 2,470 00 

Homer A. Thompson, Assistant Professor. Classical Archaeology ( half 
time) $1,700 — 818.75 .' 1.681 25 



$8,583 



Fine Art 

John Alford, Professor (paid $5,000 from Special Fund ) 

Lecturers: 

Peter Brieger (paid $2,400 from Special Fund) 

F. .S. Haines (part time — Sessional : without salary ) 

Peter Haworth, Instructor (part time — Sessional ) 400 00 



$400 00 



Geography 

Griffith Tavlor. Professor (paid also $2,470 in Ontario College of Educa- 
tion: $300 for Extension Work, and $18 from Llniversity Press) 

$4,000 — $122.50 $3,877 50 

Demonstrators ( half time — Sessional ) : 

A. H. Clark \ .500 00 

Miss A. Nicholls. . . \ (paid al-o $80 each for Extension Work) 500 00 

Miss E. K. M. Sims I 500 00 

Political Economy 
Professors : 

E. J. Urwick. Economics (paid also $14 from University Press) 

$5,500 — $90 (retired 30 June ) ' $5,410 00 

W. T. Jackman, Transportation (paid also $250 from University 

Press) $4,900 — $75.50 4,824 50 

H. A. Tunis (paid also $19 from University Press) $4,200— $61.50 4,138 50 

Associate Professors: 

V. W. Bladen, also Supervisor of Studies in Political Economy (paid 
also •'*2]0 for Extension Work and $400 from Llniversity Press) 
$4,000 — $57.50 3.942 50 



,377 50 



UMVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 203 

H. R. Kemp (paid also $80 for Extension Work) S3,900 — $55.50 . . 3,844 50 

A. Bradv < paid also S20 for Extension Work and S200 from 

University Press ) S3.600 — S49.50 3.550 50 

Assistant Professors: 

Lome T. Morgan ( paid also S200 for Extension Vi'ork ) §3,600 — 

$49.50 3,550 50 

\^ . M. Drummond (paid also SI 10 for Extension Work and $13.25 

from University Press ) $3,000 — $37.50 ( resigned 30 June ) 2,962 50 

J. F. Parkinson (paid also $325 for Extension Work) 82.500 — $30. . 2.470 00 

Miss I. M. Biss (paid also $210 for Extension Work) $2.500 — §30. 2,470 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Donald C. MacGregor (paid also §11 from University Press) $2,500 

— $30 2,470 00 

A. F. W. Plumptre (paid also §14 from University Press) $2,500 — 

$30 2,470 00 

V. F. Coe (paid also $90 for Extension Work) §2,250 — 826.25 2,223 75 

C. B. Macpherson. §1.900 — §21.25 1.878 75 

W . J. Waines, Special Lecturer ( paid also $376 for Extension Work and 

$31 from University Press ) §2,000 — §22.50 1,977 50 

J. G. Perold, Instructor (Sessional — paid also $156 for Extension 

Work ) $1,500 — $16.25 1.483 75 

L. Warshaw, Class Assistant (Sessional — paid also $90 for Extension 

Work ) 500 00 

A. J. Glazebrook, Special Lecturer. Banking and Finance (Sessional — 

paid $2,500 from Special Fund ) 

Law : 

Professors: 

W. P. M. Kennedy, Constitutional Law (paid also §262 from 

University Press) §5.700 — 895 5,605 00 

N. A. M. MacKenzie, Public and Private International Law 

( paid also 810 in School of Nursing ) $4,200 — 861.50 4,138 50 

F. C. Auld, Roman Law and Jurisprudence, §4,200 — 861.50... 4,138 50 

Jacob Finkelman. .Assistant Professor. Administrative and Industrial 

Law ( paid also $240 for Extension Work ) $2,300 — §27 2.273 00 

James M. Gage, Lecturer ( Sessional ) §1,500 — §16.25 1.483 75 

K. G. Gray. Honorary Lecturer ( Sessional — without salary ) 

Accounting: 

W. S. Ferguson. Professor (part time — paid also 3-50 for Extension 

Work ) .32,550 — §30.75 2,519 25 

Assistant Professors: 

F. R. Crocombe ( paid also 880 for Extension Work ) $3,450 — 

.$46.50 3.403 50 

C. A. Ashley. $3,150 — §44.10; Supervisor of Studies in Com- 
merce and Finance. $600 — -88.40 3.697 50 

■ §77,426 25 

Philosonhy 
Professors : 

G. S. Brett ^>i 86,000, of which §1,000 paid in Ethics (paid also 
§971.20 as Dean of Graduate Studies: $30 in Ontario College of 

Education, and 835 from University Press) §5.000 — §144.90 §4.855 10 

F. H. Anderson, §4,600 — 869.50 4,530 50 

Associate Professors: 

H. R. MacCallum (paid also $420 for Extension Work) .$4,200- 

$61.50 4,138 50 

E. W. Macdonald, $3,300 — $43.50 3.2.56 50 

W. Jarvis McCurdv. .Ass'stant Professor (paid also S368 for Extension 

Work ) .$2,800 — §34..50 2,765 50 

Marcus Long. Class Assistant (.Sessional — paid also 8390 in Athletics — 

Men I 300 00 

$19,846 10 

Psychology 
Professors : 

E. A. Bott, also Director of Laboratory ( paid also §200 for Extension 

Wr.rk ) $5,000 — S77..50 .' $4,922 50 

W. E. Blatz (part time — paid also §1.977.-50 from Child Research) 

§2.-500 — §45 2,455 00 

Associate Professors: 

S. N. F. Chant (paid als.. §400 for Exten-^i.m Work) $3,900 — $.5.5.-50 -3.844 .50 

Wni. Line (paid also .$.300 for Extension Work) $-3,600 — $49.-50. .. . 3..5-50 -50 



204 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Assistant Professors: 

J. D. Ketchum (paid also $460 for Extension Work) $2,700 — $33.. 2,667 00 

G. P. Cosgrave (paid also $758 for Extension Work) $2,500 — $30.. 2,470 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

K. S. Bernhardt ( paid also $445.50 from Child Research and $807 

for Extension Work » $2,350 — $30 2,320 00 

C. R. Myers, $2,050 — $23.25 2,026 75 

K. H. Rogers, Special Lecturer (Sessional — paid also $200 for Extension 

Work and $10 in Social Science ) 300 00 

J. S. Glen, Instructor ( Sessional — paid also $200 for Extension Work ) . 600 00 
Class Assistants (Sessional) : 

Miss D. D. Hearn (paid also $494.75 as Laboratory Attendant) 

$600 — $6 594 00 

H. C. H. Miller 500 00 

H. L. Pottle ( paid also $200 for Extension Work ) 400 00 

Miss M. D. Salter (paid also $200 from Child Research and $25 for 

Extension Work) 400 00 

D. C. Williams ( paid also $200 for Extension Work ) 400 00 

Miss D. Millichamp (paid also $1,187.50 from Child Research) 

$300 — $4.38 295 62 

G. H. Turner 300 00 

Miss D. G. Walker 300 00 

Miss M. Mason ( paid also $400 from Child Research ) 200 00 

D. Snygg (paid also $200 for Extension Work ) 200 00 

T. A. Eraser 200 00 

Miss M. L. Northwav 150 00 

G. W. Anderson (paid also $150 in Psychiatry I 100 00 

G. C. Cooper. Technician, $2,300 — $27 2,273 00 

$31,468 87 

Less paid by School of Nursing 350 00 

Italian and Spanish 

Professors : 

M. A. Buchanan. $6,000 — $102.50 $5,897 50 

J. E. Shaw. $6,000 — $102.50 5,897 50 

Emilio Goggio (paid also $200 for Extension Work I $4,200 — $61.50 4,138 50 

Associate Professors : 

G. C. Patterson. $3,600 — $49.50 3.550 50 

Juan Cano (paid also $200 for Extension Work) $3,600 — $49.50 .. . 3,550 50 

Instructors (Sessional) : 

Miss F. M. Haygarth. $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

J. H. Parker. $1,500 — $16.25 1.483 75 



,118 87 



$26,002 00 



(2) Departments in University College ($1.55,849,72) 

Classics 

Gilbert Norwood, Professor, also Director of Classical Studies, $6,250 — 

$127..50 $6,122 50 

' a ) Greek : 

E. T. Owen. Professor. $4,700 - $71..50 4,628 50 

Associate Professors : 

D. E. Hamilton. $4,200 — $61.50 4.138 50 

M. D. C. Tait (paid also $126 for Extension Work I $3,600 — 

$49..50 3.550 50 

(b) Latin: 
Professors : 

G. Oswald Smith (on leave of absence I $5,000 — $77.50 4,922 50 

E. A. Dale ( paid also $300 for Extension Work ) $4,500 — $67.50 4,432 50 
Louis A. MacKay, Assistant Professor ( paid also $472 for Extension 

Work) $3,000 — $37.50 2,962 50 

(c) Greek and Roman History: 

C. N. Cochrane. Professor (also Dean of Residence with free house. 

heat and light valued (a $300 ) $4,500 — $67.50 4.432 50 

Miss Mary C. Needier. Assistant Professor, $2,700 — $33 2.667 00 

B. R. English, Instructor (Sessional — paid also $300 for Extension 

Work and $25 from University Press) $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 



$39,340 75 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 205 

English 
Professors : 

M. W. Wallace (paid also $1,449.50 as Principal of University 

College I $6,000 — $202 $5,798 00 

R. S. Knox. $4,700 — $71.50 4.628 50 

H. J. Davis (paid also $420 for Extension Work and $10 from 

University Press » $4,700 — $71.50 ( resigned 30 June I 4.628 50 

J. F. Macdonald (paid also $420 for Extension Work) $4.500— $67.50 4,432 50 

Associate Professors: 

W. H. Clawson (paid also $420 for Extension Work I $3,800 — $53.50 3.746 50 

A. S. P. Woodhonse (paid also $500 from University Press » $3,700 

—$51.50 3.648 50 

N. J. Endicott, Assistant Professor ( paid also $314 for Extension Work I 

$2,700 — $33 2,667 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

J. R. MacGillivrav (paid also $806 for Extension Work and $50 from 

I'niversity Press ) $2,550 — $30.75 2,519 25 

A. Earle Birnev (paid also $300 for Extension Work) $2,000 — 
$22.50 1.977 50 



$34,046 25 



French 
Professors : 

F. C. A. Jeanneret. $5,500 — $90 $5,410 00 

J. S. Will. $5,000 — $77.50 4,922 50 

St. E. de Champ (paid also $200 for Extension Work) $4,500 — 

$67.50 4.432 50 

Associate Professors : 

W. J. McAndrew ( paid also $788 as Registrar of University College ) 

$3,700 — $55.50 3.644 50 

H. L. Humphreys (paid also $126 for Extension Work) $3,500 — 

$47.50 3.452 50 

Assistant Professors: 

J. G. Andison (paid also $530 for Extension Work) $3,300 — $43.50 3,256 50 

R. D. C. Finch (paid also $420 for Extension Work) $3,000 — $37.50 2.962 50 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Miss A. C. Cole (paid also $212 for Extension Work) $2.350— $27.75 2.322 25 

A. K. Laflamme. $2,150 — $24.75 2.125 25 

Jean A. Houpert. $2,000 — $22.50 1.977 50 

Miss Isabel Balthazard (paid also $324 for Extension Work) $1,800 

— $20 1,780 00 

Miss M. D. MacDonald (paid also $200 for Extension Work) $1,800 
— 120 1.780 00 

G. L. Assie ( paid also $500 for Extension Work ) $1,800 — .$20 1.780 00 

German 

Barker Fairley. Professor. $6,000 — $102.50 $5,897 50 

Thure Hedman, Associate Professor. $4,000 — $57.50 3.942 50 

G. E. Holt. Assistant Professor (paid also $420 for Extension Work) 

$3,450 — $46.50 3.403 50 

Lecturers (Sessional ) : 

H. Boeschenstein (paid also $691.60 in Chemical Engineering and 

$300 for Extension Work ) $1,950 — $23.85 1.926 15 

Victor Lange (paid also $30 in Ontario College of Education and 

$500 for Extension Work ) $1,950 — $21.88 1,928 12 

Semitic Languages 

Professors : 

W. R. Taylor (on leave of absence) $5,500 — $90 $5,410 00 

T. J. Meek. $5,200 — $82.50 5.117 50 

F. V. Winnett, Assistant Professor (on leave of absence. Easter Term) 
$2,700 — $33 2.667 00 

W. S. McCullough. Lecturer (Sessional ) $2,200 — $25.50 2.174 .50 

Fellows (Sessional ) : 

M. T. Newbv 400 00 

W. G. Brown 200 00 

L. Jacober 200 00 



$39,846 00 



$17,097 



$16,169 00 



206 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

El hies 
G. S. Brett. Professor (see also Philosophy ) $1,000 — $28.80 971 20 

University College General 

M. W. Wallace, Principal (see also English ) .$1,500 — $50.50 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson. Dean of Women (with living valued <ii $400) 

$2,500 — $30 

W. J. McAndrew, Registrar (see also French ) $800 — $12 

Miss R. Gregory, Registrar's Assistant 

Miss C. Tocque. Stenographer in I niversitv College. $1,400 — $15 

Miss M. Blackburn, Secretary- in Registrar's Office, $1,300 — $13.75 



$1,449 50 




2.470 00 




788 00 




1.000 00 




1.385 00 




1.2&5 25 






$8,378 75 






$721,926 73 


$25 23 




15 05 




59 71 




4 81 




1 47 




92 94 


TOO 91 



22. Mathematics 
Class room supplies ($106.27) : 

American Matlieniatical Society, dues 

A. W. Tucker, reprints 

University Extension, stencils, ink and paper 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Superintendent's Dept., freight 

Clerical assistance: 

University Extension, making stencils, etc 

23. Applied Mathemat cs 

Class room supplies i $341.49 ) : 

American Institute of Physics, reprints $15 68 

Grand & Toy. cabinet and index 14 22 

Hirschwaldsche Buchhandlung. books 20 88 

Murdoch Stationery, paper 27 00 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. cabinet and guides 34 00 

Postage 14 00 

Roneo Co., stencils, ink. paper, etc 76 50 

University Press, printing and stationery 118 44 

Accounts' under $10 (6 ) ' 20 77 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss M. J. Thomson, 37Vi. weeks 450 00 



24. Physics 

Laboratory and workshop supplies ($5,391.03 ) : 

Agfa Ansco Ltd., glycin $12 36 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 96 66 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 28 46 

Anaconda American Brass Ltd., brass rods and tubing 123 28 

Baird & Tatlock. scales and terminals 13 88 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.. crystals, slides, etc 44 85 

Big A Co.. casters 42 55 

Billingham & .Stanley, lamp 19 53 

Bond Ensineering Works, beams and casting 49 06 

W. E. Booth Co.. lantern plates 148 03 

Canada Metal Co.. castings 118 83 

Canada Wire & Cable Co.. wire 43 19 

Canadian General Electric Co., lamps, etc 29 83 

Canadian Industries Ltd., chemicals 26 72 

Canadian Kodak Co.. filters, plates, etc 38 42 

Canadian Laboratory -Supplies, glassware and chemicals 302 45 

Canadian National Carbon Co., carbons and batteries 86 21 

G. Cassons Ltd.. brushes 13 82 

Century .Scientific Co., tubing, posts, etc 118 81 

Clough-Brengle & Co., oscillator 29 54 

Codex Book Co.. paper 18 17 

Corning Glass Works, filters, tubes, etc 40 37 

Diamond State Fibre Co.. fibre rod 17 23 

Disher Steel Construction Co., steel beams 16 47 

Dominion Oxvgen Co.. gas 421 30 

Drummond. McCall Co., tubing 63 86 

Eastman Kodak Stores, chemicals, plates, etc 23 27 



791 49 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 207 

Eastman Photographic Stores, plates, chemicals and lamps 96 69 

T. Eaton Co., stools, pans and sundries 23 52 

Electric Specialty Co., brushes 14 87 

Exide Batteries, batteries 60 64 

Freyseng Cork Co., corks 12 02 

Gelwynne, Magnesite & Magnesia Corporation, polish 10 17 

General Radio Co., radio parts 37 87 

Gevaert Co., photographic paper 27 18 

Griffin &. Tatlock, thermometers, etc 83 32 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Co., tubing 63 02 

Haynes Art Gallery, framing photographs 33 75 

J. F. Hartz Co., quartz wedge 15 10 

Geo. H. Hees & Sons Co., Venetian blinds 37 77 

Adam Hilger, Ltd., rack, crystals, reprints, etc 103 14 

Imperial Oil Ltd., oil 23 86 

Johnson, Matthey & Co., recovering radium, platinum wire, etc 159 13 

Kimble Glass Co., tubing 78 64 

P. J. Kipp & Zonen, prism 11 86 

Lake Simcoe Ice & Fuel Ltd., ice 48 38 

E. Leybolds Nachfolger, glassware 83 60 

W. R. McKee, electrical repairs 15 95 

Meyer School Supplies, chalk 10 96 

National Bureau of Standards, filter 10 15 

Nichols Chemical Co., chemicals 23 00 

Palmer Thermometer Co.. thermometer 19 18 

Peake & Whittingham, prints 12 96 

Peckover's Ltd., steel 13 55 

T. S. Plaskett, tools 90 00 

Thos. Pocklington, balances repaired 25 00 

Polaroid Corporation, discs 83 78 

Postage 62 50 

Pratt & Lambert, varnish 17 57 

Pratt & Whitnev, drills 33 88 

W. G. Pye & Co., paper 55 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 13 40 

Rolls & Darlington, soap, glycerine, etc 14 23 

Roneo Co., stencils, ink and paper 54 14 

K. Selmay. filaments 10 34 

Robt. Simpson Co., cloth 10 78 

Stewart Warner Alemite Corporation, glides 11 45 

Stupakoff Laboratories, filaments 14 33 

Thermos Bottle Co.. fillers 13 54 

Toronto Hydro Electric System, current 189 30 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher, Ltd., chair 12 00 

Victor X-Ray Corporation, insulator, films, etc 10 22 

Wholesale Radio Co., radio parts 87 97 

University Press, printing and stationery 380 23 

Accounts under 810 (47 ) 219 62 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

.Seminar teas, S19.91 ; hardware. S18.23: sundries, $21.77 59 91 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $129.71; labour. .$229.47; material. 

$44,5.23 804 41 

Annaratus ($1,907.92) : 

Art Metropole, apertometer 39 92 

Baird & Tatlock, microscope and parts 53 47 

Burke Electric & X-Ray Co.. transformer, valves, etc 297 50 

Canadian General Electric Co., lamps, sockets, etc 45 74 

Walter A. Carveth Co., condenser 42 50 

Central Scientific Co., water motor, electromagnetism apparatus, etc. 149 05 

James Chesterman & Co., gauge 31 11 

Griffin & Tatlock. stop clock, etc 67 50 

Adam Hilger Ltd.. rotating sector for spectrograph 179 00 

Milton-Thompson, electric fan 26 50 

W. B. Nicholson, balance 10 .58 

Polaroid Corporation, experimental kit 25 52 

W. G. Pye & Co.. gauges 41 40 

Screen & .Sound Service, lantern 70 00 

James .Swift, camera 40 00 

Western Electrical Instrument Corporation, galvanometer, etc 308 28 

Wholesale Radio Co., condenser 81 95 

Zenith Electric Co., resistances 113 41 

Acroimts under $10 (2) 6 58 



208 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Superintendent"? Dept.. labour, $1.00; material. $276.91 277 91 

Experimental tables, cases, books, charts, fittings, etc. ($750.55) : 

Akademische \ erlagsgesellschaft. reprints 

American Institute of Mining & Metallurgical Engineering, reprints 

American Institute of Physics, reprints 

Engineering, subscription 

Johnson Office Furniture Co., desk 

Macmillan Co.. subscription 

National Research Council, reprints 

T. S. Plaskett. books 

Royal Society, reprints 

University Press, books and reprints 

Accounts' under $10 ( 10 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $265.42: material, $177.69 

Laboratory and workshop assistance ($1,448.90) : 

L. Hughes. 44 weeks, 1 day 

S. Collins. 43 weeks, 3 days 

G. Nixon. 40 weeks 

A. Owen, 8H> weeks ( see also Salaries) 

R. D. Hiscocks. 4 weeks, V2 day 

B. McFarlane. 2 weeks 

Miss F. M. Quinlan. 1 week (see also Salaries ) 

K. C. Mann. 17 hours 

Research apparatus, etc. ($468.14) : 

C. P. R. Telegraphs 

Walter A. Carveth Co., microscopes 

Adam Hilger Ltd., crystal 

Leeds & Northrup Co., galvanometer 

R. H. Nichols, potentiometer 



17 83 


i 10 37 


14 88 


14 46 


25 00 


14 17 


21 05 


10 00 


27 19 


95 03 


57 46 


443 11 


397 50 


391 50 


360 00 


123 67 


65 33 


62 50 


31 40 


17 00 


10 10 


118 35 


88 13 


105 22 


146 34 



Less charged to Sir John McLennan Fund $468 14 

Credits: Laboratory deposits. $850.50; sale of 
material, etc.. $43.75 894 25 



$9,966 54 



1.362 39 



25. Astronomy 
At University: 

Supplies ($281.83) : 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., balopticon $68 25 

Grand & Toy, paper 17 50 

Harvard College Observatory, charts 10 13 

Geo. Hees Sons & Co., shade 21 22 

Postage 12 00 

L'niversity Press, printing and stationery 57 48 

Accounts under $10 (6 ) 24 76 

Sundry disbursements by department 13 95 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $22.08; labour. $15.82; material. 

$18.64 56 54 

At Observatory: 

Supplies and apparains ($1,797.32) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 64 50 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., prism 46 72 

W. E. Booth Co., plates 125 30 

F. Y. W. Braithwaite. micrometer, etc 73 53 

Butterfield"s Division, ITnion Trust Drill Co., drills 21 48 

Canadian General Electric Co.. motor, etc 15 07 

Chicago Gear Works, gear 21 92 

Eastern Science Supply Co., celestial globes 25 18 

Eastman Kodak Stores, chemicals, films, plates, etc 16 68 

Eastman Photographic Stores, chemicals, lantern, etc 13 75 

T. Eaton Co.. mattress and linoleum 12 02 

Sir Howard Grubb-Parsons Co., motor 27 73 

G. M. Laboratories, electric cells 15 29 

P. J. Kipp & Zonen. galvanometer 158 18 

Mitchell & McGill, card cabinet 50 00 

C. A. Parsons & Co., telescope 412 50 

H. W. Petrie. lathe attachment Ill 39 

Postage 12 00 

Shallcross Mfg. Co., resistance box 33 67 

Sheppard & Gill Lumber Co.. lumber 18 90 



i.604 15 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



209 



L nderwuod-Elliott-Fislier Co., copy holder 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (8 1 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Express and postage, $10.30; liardware and sundries. S27.II 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $11.65; telephone calls, $6.22; 

labour. $161.69; material. $172.49 

Library, including binding and mending * $495.69 I : 

F. A. Brockhaus, book and subscription 

Hirschwaldsche Buchhandlung, books 

MacMillan Co., subscription 

N. V. Martinus Nijhoff, books 

Postage 

Star Book Co., atlas 

University Press, books, binding and stationery 

Accounts' under $10 ( 8 ) 

Travelling allowances ( $300 ) : 

J. F. Heard 

F. S. Hogg 

P. M. Millman 

Attendants and incidentals ($58.94) : 

W. S. Johnston & Co., tickets 

T. Mackenzie, caretaker's overtime services 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Less door receipts 

26. Geology 
Maintenance ($631.29): 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware 

Dr. Madeleine A. Fritz, lantern slides 

Grand & Toy. files 

Dr. G. Grubber & Co., slides 

Miss Helen S. McCaul, typing and mimeographing 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., holders and labels 

Photographic Service, slides 

Postage 

Thos. Pocklington Co., instrument repairs 

Bobbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

R. Spencer Soanes, thermometer 

Ward's Natural Science Establishment, specimens 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 13 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $6.93; labour, $113.22; material, 

.%3.28 

Summer Field Work, travelling expenses, etc. ($532.03) : 

British & American Motors Ltd., used car, $265; less allowance on 
old car, $115 

Prof. A. P. Coleman, expenses 

A. Glauser, expenses , 

Instruments Ltd., protractor 

Prof. E. S. Moore, honorarium, $100; expenses. $47. .58 

Thos. Pocklington Co., compass 

Accounts under $10 (4 ) 

Less credit from sale of slides 

27. MlNER.\LOCY 

Maintenance and equipment : 

Canadian Industries Ltd., chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, screens, etc 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., microscope, parts, etc 

Central .Scientific Co.. glassware and chemicals 

Eimer & Amend, chemicals 

Frencli Ivory Products, sheeting 

Prof. Ellis Thomson, re labelling specimens 

Ward's Natural Science Establishment, specimens 



22 50 
75 47 
34 08 

37 41 

352 05 



20 


75 


11 


55 


14 36 


12 


53 


12 


00 


10 


47 


368 


41 


45 62 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


1 


07 


57 


50 




37 


$2,933 78 


274 25 




•o f.ct) CO 






$10 


29 


14 96 


15 


00 


23 


00 


52 88 


16 


00 


23 


92 


32 


95 


15 00 


43 


50 


29 


39 


30 00 


43 


23 


38 


13 


.59 61 



183 43 



150 


00 


101 


19 


81 


00 


10 


20 


147 


58 


12 


50 


29 


56 


$1,163 32 


5 


10 




41 ic;a 99 


$24 03 


50 


53 


334 90 


73 


36 


15 


14 


16 20 


33 


25 


14 


52 



210 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 11 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendents Dept., freight, 15.64; labour, $55.95; material 
$27.50 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $199.50; sale of material, $8^ 

28. Chemistry 
Maintenance: 
Chemistry: 

Chemicals, glassware, apparatus, etc. ($8,437.54) : 

American Institute of Physics, reprints 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.. lens 

Belle Ewart Co., ice 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 

Canada Colors & Chemicals Co., alcohol 

Canadian Kodak Co., chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc.... 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., microscope 

Central Scientific Co., glassware, etc 

Coulter Copper & Brass Co., condenser, copper wool, etc.. . . 

Creamery Package Mfg. Co., churn 

T. Eaton Co., tables and bowls 

Fisher Scientific Co., forceps and glassware 

Gustav Fock, chemicals and text books 

Foreman Marine Equipment Ltd., repairs to gear pump. . . 

Paul Haach, chemicals 

Hart House, tomato juice 

O. W. Hertzberg, chemicals 

Ingram & Bell, cells, funnels, etc 

International Titanium Ltd., carboys 

Johnson, Matthey & Co., crucibles and specimen metals. . . . 

Leeds & Northrup Co., potentiometer 

Longmans, Green & Co., text books 

Mack Printing Co., reprints 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals 

Merck & Co., chemicals, etc 

Eleybold's Nachfolger, pumps 

National Drug & Chemical Co., chemicals 

Nichols Chemical Co., acids 

Ontario Rubber Co., tubing 

Postage 

Richards Glass Co., tubes, etc 

Richardson, Bond & Wright, cards, etc 

Rudd Mfg. Co., coils 

Scientific Glass Apparatus Co., distilling apparatus 

Staatliche Porzellar, crucibles 

Standard Chemical Co., chemicals 

Stephens Sales Ltd., stencils, etc 

Synthetic Drug Co., bottles 

Textile Products Co., towels 

E. M. Tozer, crushing ore, etc 

Wall Chemicals Ltd., oxygen, etc 

Ward Leonard Electric Co., rheostats 

Weston Electric Instrument Corporation, ammeters 

S. S. White Co., gas 

Williams & Wilson Ltd., elements and terminals 

Wilson Scientific Co.. thermometers, filter paper, etc 

Llniverslty Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 19 » 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Hardware, $52.16; telegrams, express and stationery, 
$39.24; glassware, $11,65; sundries, $76.86 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $70.96; labour. $594.10; 

material, $473.94 

Repairs and renewals ($301.83) : 

Beardmore Leather Ltd., belting 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $184.03; material, $73.26.. 



78 


82 


47 


06 


6 23 
J 


89 


09 


$783 


13 


282 


50 



$500 63 



$19 19 
22 54 
11 40 

250 88 

11 48 
113 02 
651 46 

52 50 
1.025 56 

154 76 
18 00 

31 50 

32 36 
34 00 

12 85 
184 28 

53 25 
273 94 

22 59 

20 00 
63 39 

356 13 

60 75 

17 13 

133 82 

207 80 

21 98 

30 39 
341 05 
123 81 

31 00 
21 41 

28 44 
10 60 
.30 97 

54 59 
37 75 

137 96 
36 00 

2C6 40 
10 00 

32 13 

29 05 
26 88 
14 44 

112 80 

417 02 

1,435 35 

105 03 



179 91 
1,139 00 

44 54 
257 29 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



211 



Clerical assistance ($18) : 

Miss M. M. Goddard, 3 days < see also salaries ) 9 00 

Miss A. Reeves, 3 days 9 00 

$8,757 37 
Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $4,831.01; sale of 

material, etc., $10.50 4,841 51 

Physical Chemistry: 

Supplies, chemicals, etc.: 

Canadian Kodak Co., chemicals and filters $19 26 

Central Scientific Co., oven and pump 227 36 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 68 10 

Wm. & J. G. Greey Ltd., wire cloth 11 70 

Adam Hilger Ltd.. rods 69 46 

Ilford Ltd.. plates 11 93 

Johnson, Matthev & Co., silver dish 38 00 

Merck & Co., acetate 21 39 

Accounts under $10 (7) 33 26 

Superintendent's Dept., freight 3 23 

Electro-Chemistry : 

Supplies (Sl.387.17) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware $54 29 

R. W. Bateman Ltd., resistance wire 15 26 

Belle Ewart Co., ice 15 20 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 18 99 

Canadian National Carbon Co., electrodes 49 60 

Central Scientific Co.. crucibles and filter paper 571 57 

Fisher Scientific Co., glassware 150 53 

G. A. Hardie & Co., wipers 19 01 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 44 38 

Richardson, Bond & Wright, graph sheets 23 05 

Wall Chemical Ltd., gas 16 00 

Williams & Wilson, asbestos, gloves, crucibles, etc 23 10 

University Press, printing and stationery 30 44 

Accounts' under $10 (17 ) '. 68 18 

.Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware. $14.16; chemicals and stationery, etc.. 

$13.20; sundries, $34.56 6192 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, 39c; labour. $33.29; 

material, $191.97 225 65 

Apparatus ($1,128,431 : 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, clamps and gear regulator.. ^^ •'SO 

Canadian Silversmiths Ltd., silver vessel 11 85 

R. H. Chappell, glassblowing and apparatus 110 25 

Conn Engineering Co., repairs to electric oven 14 25 

Coulter Copper & Brass Co., tank and vessel 50 72 

Ingram & Bell, weights condenser 271 79 

W. Kubbinga, machine work and glassblowing 78 53 

W. R. ]\IcKee, apparatus repairs 41 8R 

Geo. A. Matthews, motor repairs 72 52 

C. C. Meredith & Co., motors 12 64 

Thos. Pocklington Co.. assembling telescope 32 50 

Radio Trade Supply Co., radio and parts 78 71 

Rov P. Rogers, power pack 10 00 

Wilson Scientific Co., rheostats 80 42 

Accounts under $10 (2 i 11 08 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $186.46; material, S45.23. . 231 69 

Laboratory cleaning: 

A, Kaellgren, battery work and cleaning 26 00 

$2,541 60 
Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $63,30; material returned, 

$17.95 81 25 



$3,915 96 



— $503 69 



$2,460 35 



«6.879 90 



212 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



29. Biology 

Laboratory and lecture room supplies, museum specimens, catalogue, 
microscopes and accessories ($4,954.19) : 

Agfa Ansco Co., acetate 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

Anatomy Dept.. microscopes 

Art Metropole, thermo hydrograph 

Biological Supply Co.. specimens 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware and chemicals 

Walter A. Carveth Co., microscope cabinet and parts 

Central Scientific Co., glassware, etc 

Coleman & Bell Co., chemicals 

Connolly Paper Box Co.. boxes 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 

Dominion Glass Co., jars 

Driver, Harris & Co., wire 

T. Eaton Co.. cotton, stop watch, etc 

C. Emmett, animals 

Fisher Scientific Co., rubber sleeves and clamps 

A. Fontaine, frogs 

Genera Insectorum. subscription 

General Biological Supply House, specimens 

D. Gestetner Ltd., ink and stencils 

Gevaert Co.. chemicals, plates, etc 

D. H. Hamley. microscope lamps 

J. F. Hartz Co., cover glasses, slides, etc 

Hydro Electric Power Commission of Ontario, battery jars 

Ingram & Bell, needles, etc 

W. H. Johnson, collecting expenses 

Leeds & Northrup Co.. resistance boxes 

W. J. LeRay. travelling and collecting expenses 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals 

Matthews, McCutcheon & Co., specimens 

Medicine Hat Pottery Co.. crock covers 

Merck & Co., acids, glycerine and carmine 

Murphy's Drug Store, photographic supplies 

Ontario Agricultural College, eggs 

Thos. Pocklington Co.. mounted paragon 

David Richardson, fish 

Rolls & Darlington, oil of cedar 

Screen & Sound Service, screen 

Sheridan Nurseries, insect food 

Smith Belting Works, raw-hide 

Standard Chemical Works, chemicals 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. coupons and paper 

Arthur H. Thomas Cf).. paper and chemicals 

Toronto General Hospital. Ontario Therapy Dept.. rebinding books. . 

Tropical Biological Collecting Service, grasshoppers 

Wilson Scientific Co.. slides 

Wistar Institnte of Anatomy and biology, reprints and subscriptions 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under |10 Ml I 

.Sundry disbursements by department: 

Animals, fruit and vegetables. 137.22; hardware. $19.98; 
simdries. $32.60 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $129.69; labour, $22.17; material, 

$274.59 

Marine laboratories, collecting: 

W. H. Johnson 

Furnishings, fittings and equipment ^$964.81) : 

Bay Salvage Co.. desk 

D. Gestetner Ltd.. duplicating machine 

Wilson Stationerv & Printing Co.. transfer cases 

Superintendent's' Dept.. labour. $396.93; material. $258.38 

Messenger service : 

Albert Prince. 35 weeks 

Incidentals f $449.35) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 



$12 


10 


55 


55 


97 50 


67 


50 


95 


63 


10 


49 


275 


58 


340 


90 


713 


57 


12 


17 


12 29 


60 


59 


27 


88 


17 92 


47 


92 


257 


00 


12 88 


84 00 


78 


25 


88 


14 


68 92 


58 


33 


60 


00 


105 


55 


23 


50 


14 


72 


12 


00 


64 


70 


100 


70 


41 


59 


15 00 


12 


35 


155 03 


266 


95 


11 


05 


49 


50 


27 


53 


15 


48 


35 


50 


10 00 


15 00 


29 


00 


168 


50 


18 


64 


15 


00 


28 


69 


46 


55 


25 37 


413 


17 


161 


76 


89 80 


426 


45 



50 00 

52 50 
245 00 

12 00 
655 31 

250 00 

$78 21 
85 00 
34 35 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



213 



Ryerson Press, cloth and moisteners 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (71 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Telegrams, etc.. $8.11; stationery, etc.. $7.02; sundries. $9.80... 

Superintendents Dept.. labour 

Experimental Research ($251.41) : 

Prof. Laurence Irving, expenses in connection with observing and 

securing beaver at Algonquin Park 

Provincial Treasurer, expenses re shipping live beaver 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 I 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $107.66; material, $25.54 

Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $862.50; sale of microscopes, 
$120; sale of material. $10.30; charged to School of Nursing, $300; 
expenses, etc.. charged to Rockefeller Fund. $251.41 

30. Botany 

Laboratory, office supplies, labour, etc. ($3,350.36) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

American Instrument Co.. relay, etc 

American Type Culture Collection, culture 

W. E. Booth Co.. photographic supplies 

Brown Bros., pads 

Canadian Industries Ltd., chemicals, etc 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 

Canadian Liquid Air Co.. gas 

Canadian Pad & Paper Co., mimeo paper 

Canadian Powers Regulator Co., adjusting thermometers 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 

Mrs. A. Chilton, washing microscopes 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory coats 

Eastman Kodak Stores, films, paper, etc 

Eastman Photographic Stores, films, paper and slides 

T. Eaton Co.. knives 

Fisher Scientific Co.. rubber tubing and brushes 

Gevaert Co., lantern plates 

Grand & Toy. ink. cards, carbon, etc 

Fred W. Halls Paper Co., paper 

J. F. Hartz Co.. cover glasses, slides, etc 

F. Hellige & Co., micro cells 

Johnson & Johnson, cotton 

Kelvinaior Ltd., refrigerator repairs 

Lowe-Martin Co., transfer cases 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals 

Masco Co.. globes 

Mimeograph Co.. ink. paper and stencils 

Parisian Laundry Co 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Postage 

Queen City Glass Co., plate glass 

Richards Glass Co.. glassware 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection and repairs , 

H. J. Schempff. plant collection 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. cfuipons and paper 

Telfer Paper Box Co., boxes and filing cases 

Toronto Envelope Co.. envelopes 

Edw. Webb & Sons, bulbs and spray 

Theodore Oswald Weigel. specimens and journals 

Wilson Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 

l^niversity Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (31 1 

Travelling expen.ses. members of staff: 

H. S. Jackson 

H. B. Sifton 

A. Simpson 

R. B. Thomson 

Dr. J. Gertrude Wright 

Sundry persons 



13 


92 


176 03 


34 


57 


24 93 


2 34 


1 

75 


00 


32 


96 


10 


25 


133 


20 



$6,919 76 



1,544 21 



$22 18 

43 54 
37 82 
30 22 

25 13 

26 55 
152 41 

15 04 

16 85 

13 04 
220 67 

30 00 

15 35 
75 69 
35 73 
52 45 
10 58 
94 65 

44 54 
84 83 

16 52 

45 44 
29 94 
20 14 
22 50 
37 50 

10 48 
16 80 
37 91 
73 45 

18 05 
73 50 

11 33 
50 47 
43 20 
16 17 
35 09 

120 16 

14 85 

19 00 
61 61 

329 51 
439 90 
140 94 

39 70 
16 70 
18 40 

20 00 
14 80 
13 45 



$5,375 55 



214 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Sundry disbursements by department: 

Drugs and stationery, S31.49; hardware, $17.93; supplies, 

$19.51; telegrams, etc., .|11.35; sundries, §25.52 

Superintendent's dept.. freight. §114.65; labour, .S82.14; material, 

§192.99 

Herbaria, Bear Island Laboratory: 

Cases, labour, supplies, etc. (§641.62) : 

Grand & Toy, folders 

K. M. Mayall, assistant in herbarium, 2^-2 mos 

Ofl&ce Specialty Mfg. Co.. herbarium cases 

Provincial Treasurer, rental of Bear Island lot 

R. C. Russell, specimens 

H. Snyder, journal 

Accounts under §10 (3 1 

Travelling expenses, members of staff: 

R. F. Cain 

H. S. Jackson 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, §1.75; material, §9.86 

Botanic Gardens and Greenhouse supplies and labour (§1,203.02) : 
Assistant Gardeners: 

W. M. C. Chilton. 2.296 hours 

Wm. A. Clarke, 556^ •> hours 

Miss K. Simpson, 27 hours 

Adams Flowers, bulbs 

Canada Metal Co., ribbon 

Capital Exterminating Co., fumigating greenhouse 

Clark & McFarlane, palm tub 

Dale Estate, plants and fibre 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., mastic flooring 

Medicine Hat Pottery Co.. pots 

Ocean Chemicals Ltd.. fumigating greenhouse 

A. Simpson, travelling and collecting expenses 

Ed. Webb & Sons, plants, charcoal, etc 

Accounts under §10 (II ) 

Sundrv disbursements bv department: 

Hardware, §6.36; seeds. §6.50: supplies. §8.17: sundries, §3.30.. 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, §24.32; material, $41.71. 

Apparatus and equipment (§2,121.88 1 : 

American Instrument Co., thermostat 

J. Anderson, making vacuum flasks 

Art Metropole. plate holder 

Canadian General Electric Co., motor 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., refrigerator 

Walter A. Carveth Co.. microscope attachments 

Central Scientific Co., table support 

T. Eaton Co.. camera, meter, etc 

Dr. D. H. Hamly, microscope lamps 

Hoke Inc.. valve gauge 

Keys & Co., iron pots 

Matthews, McCutcheon & Co.. objectives 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., filing sections and cards 

Screen & Sound Service, camera 

Accounts under §10 (2) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. §644.85; material, §566.06 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits. §711.50: sale of microscopes, 
S210; use of gasoline launch by Provincial Government, §47.50... 



31. H STORY 

Class room supplies ( §186.59) : 

Denoyer-Geppert Co., maps 

Photographic Service, lantern service and slides 

Postage 

Bobbins & Townsend. tvpewTiter inspection, etc 

University of Chicago Press, map 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Supperintendent's Dept.. freight, §1.02; material, 19c 
Secretarial assistant : 

Miss F. Hahn. 8 mos 



105 80 




389 78 




17 25 




150 00 




240 00 




10 00 




31 31 




33 77 




11 93 




48 20 




87 55 




11 61 




631 40 




113 30 




8 40 




16 73 




21 71 




12 50 




25 00 




24 45 




79 80 




20 70 




19 90 




63 05 




22 83 




52 89 




21 33 




66 03 




26 43 




13 00 




18 72 




26 12 




220 20 




37 00 




36 26 




95 50 




126 00 




30 18 




18 00 




40 00 




180 27 




36 00 




7 29 




1,210 91 




$7,316 88 




969 00 






$6,347 88 


$29 05 


6 00 




20 00 




12 80 




12 97 




96 84 




7 72 




1 21 





800 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



215 



Research expenses ( $93 1 : 

Travelling expenses: 

R. Macdonald 13 30 

M. J. Maloney 9 90 

N. Penlington 13 30 

Mrs. Helen -Bredin, typing thesis 56 50 

32. Anthropology 
Class room supplies: 

Photographic Service, prints $1.00 

University Press, printing and stationery 10 04 

33. Archaeology 
Class room supplies: 

Photographic Service, prints and slides $371 30 

Pringle & Booth, slides 30 21 

34. Fine Art 

Equipment (S543.72I : 

College Art Association, dues SIO 14 

Grand & Toy, cabinets and typewriter stand 181 20 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. desk and tables 48 90 

Robbins & Townsend, rebuilt tvpewTiter. $75; inspection. 60c 75 60 

Accounts under SIO ( 3 I '. 14 34 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $130.04; material, $83.50 213 54 

Slides, journals and stationery, use of lantern and operator ($633.23) : 

National Gallery, slides 10 .58 

Photographic Service, slides 330 30 

Postage 5 25 

University of London, slides 164 41 

University Press, printing and stationery 63 02 

Accounts' under $10 (7) 20 39 

Sundry disbursements by department 10 00 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $22.38 ; labour, $6.90 29 28 

Occasional assistance in Library : 

Miss E. A. Hudson, 8 mos 450 00 

Books, pictures, etc. ($388.79) : 

Melrose Fine Arts Ltd.. pictures 49 00 

Raymond & Raymond, art portfolio and catalogue 81 67 

University of Toronto Library, books 24 50 

University Prints, reprints and books 59 05 

University Press, printing and stationery 159 00 

Accounts under $10 (5 ) 15 57 

$2,015 74 

Less charged to J. W. L. Forster Fund 388 79 

35. Geography 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware $34 84 

Art Metropole, tracing paper, brushes, etc 18 68 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, burettes, thermometers, etc 11 84 

Grand & Toy, staples, folders, etc 20 55 

Mimeograph Co., stencils, paper, mimeographs, etc 88 09 

Photographic Service, slides 71 90 

Geo. Philip & Son, maps, barometers, etc 167 42 

Chas. Potter, lamps 12 75 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 35 00 

U. S. Dept. of the Interior, maps 14 74 

University Press, printing and stationery 175 15 

Accounts' under $10 (5) 19 13 

.Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery. $^6.75 ; sundries. 820.45 57 20 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $5.65: material. S6.19 11 84 

$7.39 13 

Less credits : Laboratory deposits 183 00 



$1,079 59 



$11 04 



$401 51 



$1,626 95 



$556 13 



216 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



36. Political Economy 

Office and class room supplies ( $711.32) : 

Commerce Club, journals, etc $15 00 

Jas. McDowell & Co., calculator inspection 28 00 

Photographic Service, prints 14 94 

Postage 235' 75 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 18 00 

Stephens Sales Ltd., ink, paper and stencils 89 98 

University Press, printing and stationery 267 64 

Accounts under $10 (7 ) 21 61 

Sundry disbursements by department 15 01 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $4.97; material, 42c 5 39 

Clerical assistance ($1,7201 : 

Miss J. I. Horrell. 10 mos 1,000 00 

Miss K. Harkness, 9 mos 720 00 

37. Philosophy 
Supplies, clerical assistance, etc. 

Miss H. Desbrisay, clerical assistance. 118Vj hours $59 25 

Grand & Toy, filing cabinet and transfer cases 16 .50 

Accounts under $10 ( 3 » 11 41 



38. Psychology 

Supplies ($1,413.89) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware $21 46 

R. C. Bush, repairing stop watches 10 00 

Central Scientific Co., gears 17 64 

E. Cullen, rats 12 90 

T. Eaton Co.. lamps, tables, etc 33 83 

D. Gestetner Ltd.. ink and stencils 144 32 

Harvard Apparatus Co., signal magnets 23 00 

Houghton. Mifflin & Co., booklets 18 04 

Lockhart's Camera Exchange, lantern plates, etc 14 02 

Postage 49 00 

Psychology Corporation, scoring key 18 39 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 98 90 

Ryerson Press, cards, binders, etc 18 83 

Screen & Sound Service, films and negatives 30 00 

John B. Smith & Sons, lumber 70 61 

World Book Co., tests 11 75 

University Press, printing and stationery 461 92 

Accounts under $10 (16 ) 59 97 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Drugs, stationery, etc., $9.44; hardware, $19.24; sundries. $16.32 45 00 
Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $10.56; labour. $31.02; material. 

$212.73 254 31 

Apparatus and equipment ($489.22) : 

Canadian National Carbon Co.. batteries 28 78 

Central Scientific Co., polaroids, etc 29 19 

Garage Supply Co., gauge and coupling caps 14 00 

Northern Electric Co., soldering iron and vacuum tubes 22 99 

Prestolite .Storage Battery, batteries 12 72 

Radio Trade Supply Co., amplifier and speaker 54 35 

Wholesale Radio Service, resistors 65 99 

Windeler Electric Co., motor 12 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 22 55 

Accounts under $10 (5 ) 23 49 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $112.77; material, $90..39 203 16 

Clerical assistance: 

Mrs. W. Mussen, 12 mos 1.000 00 

Laboratory attendance ($844.75) : 

Miss D. D. Hearn, 12 mos. (paid also $594 as Class Assistant) 494 75 

Miss G. Evans. 12 mos. (paid also $3.50 from Child Research ) 3.50 00 

Laboratory cleaning: 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 22 38 

$3,770 24 

Less credits: Duty and import taxes 26 02 



$2,431 32 



!7 16 



$3,744 22 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 217 

39. Italian and Spanish 

Class room supplies and clerical assistance: 

Miss M. French, clerical assistance, 256 hours .fl79 20 

Robbins & Townsentl, typewriter inspection S 40 

University Press, printing and stationery 29 26 



25 


37 


19 85 


40 


00 


81 


47 


1 


97 


15 


85 


52 


00 


2 


00 


4 92 


18 


93 


15 00 


15 62 


1 


57 



40. University College Departments 
Class room supplies: 
Classics ( $62.30 ) : 

Callow Bros., stapler and staples 10 50 

Grand & Toy. chairs 17 50 

University Press, printing and stationery 33 08 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 1 22 

English: 

University Press, printing and stationery 9 40 

French ($168.66 t: 

M. J. Lallement. phonograph records 

Libraire Garncau. books 

Linguaphone Institute, phonograph records 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Superintendents Dept., freight 

German ($74.77) : 

Grand & Toy, chair 

Stainton & Evis. book 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $3.90; material. $1.02 

Semitics ($51.12) : 

American Colony Stores, slides 

Chas. Potter, lantern slides 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 



41. University College General Expenses 

Office supplies, stationery, printing and incidentals ($641.35) : 

D. Gestetner, coupons, stencils, etc 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 6 » 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Messenger service ($445) : 

C. Collinson. 43^/2 weeks 

Miss W. T. Dole, 20 hours 

Sundry expenses of the Principal ($124.70) : 

Dunlop's Ltd.. funeral spray 

Robt. Simpson Co.. First Year Reception and Scholarship Tea.... 

A. Bain, overtime services re reception 

Mrs. A. Yates, services re reception 

Issue of Bulletin: 

University Press 



42. University College Building 

Heat and light $.5,181 21 

Gas. $79.44; water. $179.93 259 37 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 486 60 

Cleaning ($4,621,901: 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 

Parker's Dye Works, cleaning and repairing chesterfield, etc 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals ($4,993.46) : 

Art Window Shade Co.. shades 

Wm. Bartlelt & .Sons, shades and lantern service 

Dustbane Products Ltd.. pcdishing machine 



53 90 


32 


10 


37 


40 


4,498 


50 


15 05 


30 87 


247 


.50 



$213 86 



$366 25 



$137 46 


220 00 


10 80 


246 15 


25 74 


1 20 


435 00 


10 00 


5 00 


112 70 


4 50 


2 50 


424 98 


— $1,636 03 



218 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Electrolux Ltd., machine inspection 5 00 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 43 85 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $3,499.81; material, $1,151.38 4,651 19 

Caretaker, A. Bain, 12 mos., $1,500 — $16.25; (and overtime, $20..50) ... 1,483 75 



$17,026 29 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant $5,181 21 

Sundry credits: Repairs, $290.12; cleaning, $295.83; supplies, 

$92.05 678 00 

5,859 21 



43. McLennan Laboratory (Physics) 

Heat and light $4,482 06 

Gas, $169.12; water, $560.33 729 45 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 149 59 

Cleaning ($1,464.02): 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 12 12 

New York Window Cleaning Co 75 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1,376 40 

Repairs and renewals ($2,098.03) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 14 04 

Harkness & Hertzberg, engineering services 25 00 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., tiling 12 02 

Accounts under $10 (2) 14 05 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,410.13; material, $622.79 2,032 92 

Caretaker, H. Hill, 12 mos., $1,450 — $15.62; (and overtime, $135) 1,434 38 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant. 
Credit for cleaning 



44 Chemical Building 



$4,482 06 
13 00 


$10,357 53 
4,495 06 





Heat and light $2,193 26 

Gas, 312.33; water, $240.94 553 27 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 134 34 

Cleaning ($1,572.88): 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 19 60 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 21 72 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1,531 56 

Repairs and renewals ($1,489.43) : 

Art Window Shades Co.. repairs 30 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $1,018.85; material, $470.28 1,489 13 

Caretaker (paid as laboratory assistant with rooms, heat and light valued 

(o $420, chargeable against building and included in above) 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant .... $2,193 26 
Credit for cleaning 7 08 



$5,943 18 
2,200 34 



4.5. Biological Building 

Heat and light $2,524 47 

Gas. $57.60; water, $290.07 347 07 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 189 40 

Cleaning ($1,844.59) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Repairs and renewals ($1,804.17) : 

Art Window Shade Co.. shades, etc 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 

Canadian Germicide Co., vending machine 



26 95 

17 88 

1,799 76 


14 35 

1 90 

19 80 



$11,167 08 



$5,862 47 



$3,742 84 



UiNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 219 

John Nelson & Son. plaster repairs 57 57 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, Sl.048.02; material. S662.53 1.710 55 

Caretaker, A. J. Wright. 12 mos. (with rooms, heat and light valued at 

$300) $1,100 — $11.25; (and overtime. &69) 1,088 75 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant.. $2,524 47 
Credit for cleaning 32 00 



$7,799 05 
2,556 47 

46. Botanical Build:nc 

Heat and light $5,128 29 

Gas, $71.52; fuel oil, $50; water, $427.30 548 82 

Caretaker's supplies : 

Superintendent's Dept., material 192 71 

Cleaning ($2,153.15) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 49 00 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 17 40 

New York Window Cleaning Co 104 35 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1.982 40 

Repairs and renewals ($1,589.15): 

J. 0. Dougall Ltd., spray machine 129 37 

Master Mechanics Co., varnish 75 88 

Accounts under $10 (5) 22 66 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $34.11; labour, $1,105.44; material, 

$221.69 1.361 24 

Caretaker. T. Buchanan, 11 mos.. to 31 May. $1,237.50 — $13.19; (and 

overtime, $117.50) 1.224 31 



Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . . $5,128 29 
Credit for cleaning 15 00 



$10,836 43 
5,143 29 



47. Baldwin House (History) 

Light $154 12 

Fuel: 

Central Coal Co 437 51 

Gas, $9.84; water, $14.98 24 82 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendents Dept.. material 47 32 

Cleaning and furnaceman ($169.58) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 8 33 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 161 25 

Repairs and renewals ($689.84) : 

Art Window Shade Co., shades 6 10 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $403.84; material, $279.90 683 74 

Caretaker. G. A. Town. 12 mos.. $1,350 — $14.38; (and overtime, etc.. 
$182.51) 1.335 62 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant $154 12 

Credit for cleaning 59 75 



$2,858 81 
213 87 



48. No. 43 St. George Street 

Light $26 06 

Fuel ($163.87) : 

Central Coal Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. 23c; material. 50c 

Gas. $9.36 : water. $9.56 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Cleaning, furnaceman. etc. ($434.21 • : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 



163 


14 




73 


18 


92 


61 


15 


5 


76 


3 


50 


424 95 



$5,242 58 



$5j693.11 



$2,644 94 



220 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Repairs and renewals ($159.48) : 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $96.19; material, $45.89 

Less light charged to Central Power Plant $26 06 

Credit for cleaning 2 60 



14 40 

145 08 



$863 69 



28 66 



49. No. 45 St. George Street (Law) 

Light $39 18 

Fuel ($3261 : 

Central Coal Co 324 15 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $1.35; material, 50c 1 85 

Gas, $36.40 : water. $10.67 47 07 

Caretaker's supplies : 

Superintendent's Dept., material 36 77 

Cleaning ($172.46) : 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 7 86 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 164 60 

Repairs and renewals ( $344.37) : 

Robt. Simpson Co., chairs 66 60 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $187.50; material, $90.27 277 77 

Caretaker. R. Brown. 12 mos. (with rooms, heat and light valued ((i 

- and overtime, $54; retired 30 June I 950 00 

$1,915 85 

Less light charged to Central Power Plant $39 18 

Credit for cleaning 12 75 

51 93 



50. No. 47 St. George Street (Applied Mathematics) 
Fuel ($154,161: 

Central Coal Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1.51; material. 50c 

Electric current. $51.83; water, $8.00 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Cleaning, furnaceman, etc. ($228.80) : 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Repairs and renewals ($170.39 ) : 

Grand & Toy, desks 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $86.03; m.aterial. $24.15 

Less credit for cleaning 

51. Economics Building 

Light 

Fuel ($2.018.52 ) : 

Lyons. Wright Ltd 

Elias Rogers Co 

Gas, $81.41; electric current, $1,073.16: water. $89.60 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Cleaning and fireman ( $3,202.36) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry' 

New York Window Cleaning Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Repairs and renewals ($2,400.84) : 

Art Window Shade Co., shades 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 

Grand & Toy, chairs and desks 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Ltd., treads, felt paper and cement... 

Robbins & Myers Co., motor 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 



ics) 

$152 15 


2 01 


59 83 


23 39 


2 90 


225 90 


52 00 


8 21 


110 18 


$636 57 


9 25 



$6 00 



1,042 


53 


975 99 


1,244 


17 


231 


34 


28 68 


27 


50 


3,146 


18 


28 


17 


1 


00 


159 00 


124 99 


34 60 


48 


35 



$835 03 



$1,863 92 



$627 32 



UMVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 221 

Robt. Simpson Co., tables. linoleum, etc 135 45 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, Sl.447.17; material. $422.11 1,869 28 

Caretaker. Jas. McCormick, 12 mos. (with rooms valued ^(i SlOO) $1,100 

— S11.25; (and overtime, $121.701 1,088 75 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant $6 00 

Credit for cleaning, etc 29 77 



$10,191 98 
35 77 



52. Psychology Buildings 

Light $80 22 

Fuel ( $643.98 1 : 

Central Coal Co 639 60 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $2.88; material. $1.50 4 38 

Gas, $14.24; electric current, $74.64; water, $24 112 88 

Caretaker "s supplies: 

Superintendents Dept., material 56 33 

Cleaning, furnaceman, etc. ($979.32): 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 5 64 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 6 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 967 68 

Repairs and renewals ($629.72) : 

Art Window Shade Co., repairs 1 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $447.76; material, $180.% 628 72 

Sundries (local telephones connecting these buildings. University College 
and Economics building) : 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $71.91 ; material. $177.81 249 72 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant $80 22 

Credit from sale of material 50 



.752 17 
80 72 



53. David Dunlap Observatory 

Fuel ($345.34): 

P. Burns & Co $301 14 

Central Coal Co 44 20 

Electric current 738 60 

Caretaker's supplies ($31.12) : 

Toronto Salt Works, salt 15 20 

Superintendent's Dept., material 15 92 

Repairs and renewals: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $474.83; material. $164.23 639 06 

Sundries ($1,194.93) : 

Lundy Fence Co., fence 183 95 

Sheridan Nurseries, trees 2 00 

Robt. Simpson Co., linoleum repairs 10 25 

Telephone: 

Bell Telephone Co., service 54 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $856.05; material, $88.68 944 73 

Caretaker. T. McKenzie, 12 mos. (with quarters valued & $180: — and 
overtime, $57.50 ) 780 00 

$3,729 05 
Less credits: Heat, light and water iVrui. Chant) $72; cleaning, 
etc.. $1.50 73 50 



$10,156 21 



^671 45 



$3,655 55 
$820,759 88 



222 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

VI. FACULTY OF MEDICINE 

54. Salaries 

Administration 

^. E. Gallic. Dean ipaid also $9,836 as Professor of Surgery- 1 Sl.OOO — 

$16 $984 00 

E. S. Ryerson. Assistant Dean and Secretary of Faculty, and Assistant 

Professor of Surgery (paid also $393.50 in Dentistry) $5,000 — 881.. 4,919 00 
Assistants: 

Miss M. W. Jones, $1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

Miss O. Russell, $1,750 — $19.38 1,730 62 

Miss A. Perry, Clerk. $1,500 — $16.25 1,4«3 75 

H. Saunders, Messenger 800 00 

Hospital Theatre. Toronto General Hospital: 

C. Hart, Attendant. $1,550 — $16.88 1,533 12 

Robt. Murray. Attendant in Cloak Room. 30 weeks (fi $15 450 00 

$13,680 49 



2,510 00 
4,726 50 


3,646 00 


3.648 50 
3,C60 50 


500 00 
500 00 



Anatomy 
Professors : 

J. C. B. Grant, $7,000 — $202.50 $6,797 50 

W. H. Piersol, Histology and Embryology, ffi: $5,100. of which half 

charged to Biologv, $2,550 — $40 

J. C. Watt. $4,800 — $73.50 

H. A. Cates. Associate Professor (paid also $247.50 from Child Research) 
$3,700 — $54 

Assistant Professors: 

Arthur W. Ham. $3,700 — $51.50 

R. K. George. $3,100 — $39.50 

Assistants in Histology (Sessional) : 

H. D. Ball Ipaid also $150 in Athletics and Physical Training — 

Women, and $150 for Extension Work ) 

M. H. Book 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

M. J. Wilson. X-Ray ( paid also $400 in Physiology' ) 400 00 

Miss K. I. McMurrich (paid also $150 in Athletics and Physical 

Training — Women ) 

M. C. Watson 

T. M. Steele ( paid also $400 in Physiology ) 

M. Wellman (paid also $125 as Prosector — see below) 

D. A. Davidson (paid also $300 from Medical Research. Best Fund) 

C. E. A. Hassard 

I. D. Kitchen 

C. R. Rapp 

A. N. McKillop 

H. F. Mowat (paid also $1,009.75 in Surgery) $150 — $1.85 

W. E. L. Sparks (paid also $100 in Health Service) 

H. C. Elliott 

C. G. Smith ( paid also $1,483.75 in Physiology) 

T. G. Heaton 

F. L. Lawson 

A. E. Montgomery'. Dental Anatomy 

Embryology : 

A. E. Ashenhurst 

J. S. ChaikoflF 

Prosectors ( Sessional ) : 

E. M. Davidson 

Brock R. Brown 

M. Wellman 

J. G. Watt 

B. L. Guyatt 

H. E. LeMasurier. Senior Technical Assistant. $1,800 — $20 

H. F. Whittaker. Technical Assistant (paid also $120 in Dentistry) 

Miss G. Dowsley, Clerical Assistant, $1,250 — $13.12 

Laboratory Assistants: 

H. McCormick ( paid also $15 in Surger>' ) $1,650 — $18.12 

Stephen George. $1,450 — $15.62 

B. L. Guyatt, Museum Curator, $1,550 — $16.88 



700 00 


500 00 


350 00 


350 00 


2.50 00 


200 00 


200 


00 


200 00 


175 00 


148 


15 


55 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


40 


00 


15 


00 


300 00 


50 


00 


50 00 


1.000 


00 


125 


00 


125 


00 


87 


50 


37 


.50 


1.780 


00 


700 00 


1.236 88 


l.fi"'! 


88 


1.434 38 


1.533 


12 



UMVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 223 

Laboratory Boys : 

Chas. E. Storton 600 00 

W. H. Perry, 3 mos. to 30 Sept 125 00 

G. A. L. Ross. 9 mos. from 1 Oct 375 00 



$40,263 41 

Less paid by School of Nursing 200 00 

Pathology and Bacteriology 
Professors : 

Oskar Klotz ( ob. 3 Nov. — remainder of salary to 30 June paid to 

widow) $7,000 — $202.50 $6,797 50 

W. L. Holman, Bacteriologv. also Associate Director of Applied 

Bacteriology, $5,000 — $77.50 4,922 50 

W. L. Robinson, Pathology, also Associate Director of Applied 

Pathology, $2,200 — $25.50 2,174 50 

G. Shanks, Assistant Professor. Pathology 250 00 

H. K. Detweiler, Associate Director, Serology (Sessional — without 

salary ; paid in Medicine ) 

W. Magner. Special Lecturer, Pathology (Sessional ) 750 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 
Pathology : 

G. Lyman Duff. S1.800 — S20 1.780 00 

J. E. Bates (ob. 21 Feb. — salary paid to widow) 200 00 

L H. Erb 200 00 

P. H. Greey. Bacteriologv, $1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

Dr. R. Margarite Price, Bacteriology and Serology, $3,000 — $37.50 . 2,962 50 
Fellows : 

Pathology: 

Max O. Klotz, 11 mos 1,000 00 

J. C. Paterson, 7 mos 636 37 

R. P. Douglas, 4 mos. I paid also $300 as Demonstrator ) 363 60 

Dr. Marion Ross. Bacteriology, 11 mos 1.000 00 

J. D. Hamilton. Museum, 11 liios 1,000 00 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 
Pathology: 

R. P. Douglas (see also above I 300 00 

M. R. Shaver 200 00 

T. H. Belt (without salary ) 

Dr. Helen L. Vanderveer ( without salary ) 

Bacteriology: 

E. J. (:iifford 100 00 

J. E. Josephson ( without salary) 

Assistants in Laboratory: 

Miss N. W. Simpson, Pathology. $1,500 — $16.25 1.483 75 

Miss H. M. Boyd, Bacteriologv, $1,020 — S10.25 1.009 75 

Miss M. G. Hein. Technician. $1,140 — $11.75 1,128 25 

Miss Amelia Alvey. Special Technician, S1.020 — $10.25 1,009 75 

Laboratory attendants for preparing Media: 

Miss E. A. Gordon, Senior Technician, 11 mos., $1,200—812.50. . . . 1.187 .50 
Assistants: 

Miss C. Wallace, 2V2 mos. to 15 Sept. (resigned — paid also 
$1,000 as compassionate allowance for illness alleged to have 

been caused bv employment — charged to Contingencies) .... 175 (X) 
Miss Marianne Jackson. 9 mos. from 1 Oct. (o $60 to $70 per 

month 605 00 

A. Vowles 600 00 

Miss G. K. R. Bovd, Secretary, $1,260 — $13.25 1.246 75 

Miss H. M. Hammond. Librarian and Assistant Serretarv. $1.020— $10.25 1.009 75 

Miss V. L. McKinnon. Museum Stenographer, $1,260 — $13.25 1.246 75 

J. F. Payne. Preparator. $1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

Miss Erna Eck. Jimior Attendant in Museum 600 (X) 

Miss Margaret Wightman, Autopsy Recorder 960 00 

Miss G. F. Johnston. Autopsy Technician 960 (X) 

Division of Neuropathology : $41,419 ZZ 

E. A. Linell. Professor, $4,500 — $67.50 4,432 .50 

Dr. Man, I. Tom. Fellow (Sessional ) $1,800 — $20 1.780 00 

Tecl^nician*: 

Miss H. P. Tett. $1.020 — $10.25 1.009 75 

Miss Kathleen Howitt. Medicine and Surgery 940 00 

Miss C. A. Bell, Secretary, $1,020 — $10.25 1,009 75 



$40,06:^ 4i 



$.50,.591 22 



224 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Pathological Chemistry 

Andrew Hunter. Professor (paid also in C^onnaught Laboratories) 

$6,000 — $102.50 5,897 50 

T. F. Nicholson. Associate Professor, $3,450 — $46.50 3,403 50 

R. W. I. L'rquhart, Lecturer (Sessional ) LOOO 00 

Demonstrators ( Sessional • : 

D. L. Selby 600 00 

D. H. Boddington 500 00 

G. P. Hamblin, Assistant ( part time — Sessional ) 2.50 00 

I'ellows (Sessional) : 

S. H. Jackson. 4 mos. full time; 4 mos. half time; $825— $5.63 819 37 

J. B. Scott. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

C. E. Downs. Technician. $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

Harrison Downs. Laboratory Assistant, $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

Laboratory Attendants : 

Mrs. .L Faulds 750 00 

Mrs. C. McCalhim 350 GO 

Miss C. A. Shannon. Secretary. $1,200 — $12..50 1.187 50 



Phnrmary and Pharmacology 

V. E. Henderson, Professor. $6,000 — $102.-50 • $5,897 50 

G. H. W. Lucas. Associate Professor. $3,800 — $53.50 3.746 50 

M. H. Roepke, Lecturer. Pharmacology. 2 mos. to 31 Aug. (resigned) 

$366.66 — $4.24 .' 362 42 

H. V. Rice. Fellow (Sessional ) $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

Assistants (Sessional ) : 

S. F. McDonald 900 00 

J. F. A. Johnston (paid also $792 in Ophthalmology) $300 — .$3.25. . 296 75 

J. M. Scott 300 00 

A. Brock, Technical Assistant. $2,000 — $22.50 1,977 50 

Chester Codner, Laboratory Attendant. $1,160 — $12 1,148 00 

A. C. Morrison. Cleaner 600 00 

Miss D. Caldecott. Clerical Assistant 550 00 

Bio-Chemistry 
Professors : 

H. Wasteneys. $6,000 — $102.50 $5,897 50 

G. F. Marrian, $4,750 — $72.50 4.677 50 

A. M. Wynne. Associate Professor, $3,600 — $49.50 3,550 50 

B. F. Crocker. Lecturer (Sessional — paid also $198 in Special Research) 

$1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

Fellows (Sessional ) : 

G. C. Butler ( paid also $25 in Special Research ) 900 00 

Miss Edith L. Batlio 800 00 

W. H. Fishman 800 00 

Paul Hamilton 800 00 

A. D. Odell ( paid also $75 in Special Research I 800 00 

Secretarial Assistant: 

Miss M. Delamere, $1,300 — $1.3.75 1,286 25 

Miss M. M. Godard, substitute. 2 mos. (paid a^so $70 from Medical 

Research. Best Fund, and $9 in Chemistry ) 160 00 

Technicians: 

J. W. Fletcher. Senior. $1,600 — $17..50 1,582 50 

L. .Sloan. !«1.600 — $17..50 1 5«2 .50 

J. H. McClary 1.000 00 

Miss D. I. Skill 1.000 00 

Laboratory Assistants: 

G. Lumbard 1.000 00 

W. Clough 1.000 00 

Mrs. Ethel Wilkie. Laboratory Attendant 720 00 

Physiology 
Professors : 

C. H. Best (paid also in Connaught Laboratories and $2,500 from 

Medical Research. Best Fund ) $6,000 — $102.-50 $-5,897 50 

N. B. Taylor. $4,500 — $67.50 4,432 .50 

Assistant Professors : 

D. Y. Solandt (paid also $100 in Athletics and Physical Training — 

Women ) $.3,500 — .$47.-50 „ 3,452 50 

E. T. Waters (paid also -1350 for Extension Work) $2.750 — $33.75. 2,716 25 



M19 12 



.7.262 42 



$29,336 75 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



225 



E. H. Bollerell. Lecturer. Neiiro-physiology (paid also $1,481.25 in Sur- 
gery t $1,500 — $18.75 1.481 25 

E. Fidlar. Lecturer and Research Associate (paid also $346.50 in School 

of Nursing I $1,500 — $16.25 1,4«3 75 

C. G. Smith, Demonstrator (Sessional — see also Anatomy) $1,500 — 

$16.25 1,483 75 

Fellows (Sessional) : 

L. B. Jaques 700 00 

C. W. V. McCutcheon 600 00 

T. M. Steele ( see also Anatomy » 400 00 

Research Assistants: 

M. J. Wilson, 4 mos. (see also Anatomy ) 400 00 

E. A. Dobson. 3 mos. (paid also $15 from Medical Research — Best 

Fund) 225 00 

Miss Mabel Corv. Departmental Librarian. $1.250 — $13.12 1.236 88 

Miss Doris Secord. Secretarial Assistant. $1,250 — $13.12 1.236 88 

A. Elliott, Mechanician. $1800 — $20 1.780 00 

F. L. Robinson. Technical Assistant and Glassblower (paid also $495 

from Medical' Research, Best Fund t $2,000 — $25 1.975 00 

.1. D. Brown, Technical Assistant. Bin-Physics. $1.500 — $16.25 1.483.75 

W. Huntley. Laboratory Assistant for Teaching Laboratories. $1.400 — $15 1.385 00 

G. L. Robinson. Animal Caretaker. $1,200 — $12.50 1.187 50 

A. D. Crouch, Assistant Animal Caretaker, (d $900 less 3 mos 675 00 



also 



Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 

Professors (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) : 

J. G. Fitzgerald (part time— see also School of Hygiene) . . . 

R. D. Defries. Hygiene and Epidemiology (part time — pai 

$2,470 in School of Hygiene » $1,000 — $17.50 

D. T. Eraser. $4,500 — $67.50 

P. J. Moloney, Associate Professor (see School of Hygiene) 

Assistant Professors (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) : 

M. H. Brown. $1,000 — $10 

Dr. Frieda H. Fraser. $1,000 — $10 

Lecturers ( Sessional — part time ) : 

P. A. T. Sneath (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) 9 mos. from 
1 July (resigned) $375 — $3.75 

C. H. D. Clarke (paid also $900 in Biology) 3 mos. from 1 Apr 

Demonstrators (Sessional — paid also in Connaught Laboratories': 

Miss H. C. Plummer, $500 — $5 

R. Hare, $300 — $3 

Class Assistants (Sessional) : 

J. M. Corkill 

Miss E. A. Anderson, $250 — $2.50. . .'I paid also in 

J. S. Kitching. $250 — $2.50 (Connaught Laboratories 

D. Fryer. Fellow (Sessional) 

Miss NL E. Collins. Laboratory Assistant 

Miss E. Barr. Secretarial Assistant. $1,100 — $11.25 

Medicine and Clinical Medicine 

Duncan Graham, Professor. $10,000 — $155 

Assistant Professors: 
Part-time: 

H. K. Detweiler 

Goldwin Howland 

J. D. Loudon 

J. A. Oille (paid also $10 in Health Service ) 

E. J. Trow (in charge of Dermatology) 

R. F. Farquharson ((i $3,000. of which $1,000 charged to Thera- 
peutics. $2,000 — $22.50 

W. F. McPhedran (half time) 

Associates: 

W. R. Campbell, $2,500 — $30 

Part-time: 

R. G. Armour (^paid also $40 for Extension Work » 

J. H. Elliott (paid also $700 as Professor of History of Medicine. 
$40 in School of Nursing, and $30 for Extension Work) 

A. A. Fletcher (paid also $20 for Extension Work) 

A. G. McPhedran (paid also $200 in Health Service* 

H. C. Parsons 

F. W. Rnlpil 



$982 50 
4,432 50 



990 00 
990 00 



371 25 
125 00 

495 00 
297 00 

1.000 00 
247 50 
247 50 

1.000 00 
720 00 

1.088 75 



$9,845 00 



300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 

1.977 50 
500 00 

2,470 00 

250 00 

250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 



$34,232 51 



$12,987 00 



226 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Senior Demonstrators (Sessional > : 

Part-time: 

Gordon Bates < paid also §20 in School of Nursing 200 00 

G. F. Boyer 200 00 

A. H. ^. Caulfeild (paid also in Connaught Laboratories and 

SIO in Health Service) 200 00 

E. E. Cleaver 200 00 

H. A. Dixon ( paid also S20 in School of Nursing) 200 00 

Beverley Hannah ( paid also in Connaught Laboratories and $190 

in School of Nursing) 200 00 

J. Hepburn 200 00 

A. J. McKenzie 200 00 

Harris McPhedran 200 00 

W. E. Ogden 200 00 

Half-time: 

W. P. Warner 1.000 00 

G. W. Lougheed. Medicine and Clinical Microscopy 500 00 

Trevor Owen (paid also $150 in School of Nursing ) . 500 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional ) : 

Part-time : 

E. F. Brooks 150 00 

E. A. Broughton 150 00 

W. Hurst Brown 150 00 

J. Gilbert Falconer (paid also $50 for Extension Work) 150 00 

A. R. Hagerman 150 00 

F. Carlyle Hamilton 150 00 

Lawrence ^L Murrav 150 00 

D"Arcy Prendergast .' 150 00 

Half-time: 

H. H. Hyland 1.000 00 

Ian Macdonald. 10 mos 1.000 00 

N. M. Wrong 1.000 00 

Full-time: 

R. A. Cleghorn, §3,000 — $37.50 2.962 50 

J. A. Dauphinee. $2,500 — $30 2,470 00 

H. E. Rvkert. $2,500 — .$30 2.470 00 

E. J. Maltby, $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

Fellows (Sessional) : 

R. B. Kerr 1.000 00 

C. W. J. Armstrong. 10 mos 750 00 

W. A. Doidge. 10 mos 500 00 

Harris Gray. Junior Demonstrator, Clinical Microscopy, (Sessional I 250 00 

Research Assistants: 

H. W. Wakefield. $1,400 — $15 • 1.385 00 

Miss M. I. Hanna. $1,380 — $14.75 1.365 25 

Miss N. R. Hearn. Technician, Applied Physiology. $1,320 — $14 1.306 00 

Miss S. H. Glutton, Secretarial Assistant, $1,440 — $15.50 1,424 50 



Paediatrics 

Alan Brown. Professor — part time (paid also $160 in -School of Nursing) 
Associates: 

F. F. Tisdall. also Director of Paediatric Research Laboratories, 

$2,000 — $22.50 

Part-time: 

A. W. Canfield 

E. A. Morgan 

G. R. Pirie 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

Dr. Gladys L. Boyd 

Part-time: 

A. P. Hart 

George E. Smith 

Jimior Demonstrators (Sessional! : 
Full-time: 

T. G. H. Drake, $2,000 — $22..50 

Dr. Pearl Summerfeldt 

Half-time: 

Nelles Silverthorne. also Research Assistant, Bacteriology 

C. E. Snellins; 

John B. Ross": 



$350 00 



1.977 50 



250 00 
2.50 00 
250 00 


500 00 


200 
200 


00 
00 


1.977 .50 
1.000 00 


500 00 
.500 00 
300 00 



$43,359 50 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 227 

W. W. Barracloiigli. part-time 150 00 

Miss R. M. Herbert. Technician. Chemistry 200 00 

Miss M. L. Cassidy, Secretarial Assistant 500 00 



Surgery and Clinical Surgery 

W. E. Gallic, Professor ( paid also as Dean ) $10,000 — $164 $9,836 00 

Assistant Professors: 

T. A. J. Duff 300 00 

R. R. Graham (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 300 00 

W. W. Jones ( resigned 30 June » 300 00 

Robin Pearse 300 00 

D. E. Robertson (paid also $10 in Health Service, $10 in School of 

Nursing, and $25 for Post Graduate Course) 300 00 

Wallace A. Scott (on leave of absence — resigned 30 June t 300 00 

N. S. Shenstone (paid also $10 for Extension Work and $20 for Post 

Graduate Course ) 300 00 

G. E. Wilson ( paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course ) 300 00 

E. S. Ryerson (see also Administration ) 

Associates: 

R. E. Gaby 250 00 

R. I. Harris (paid also $10 for Extension Work and $20 for Post 

Graduate Course ) 250 00 

A. B. LeMesurier 250 00 

K. G. McKenzie (paid also $20 for Extension Work) 250 00 

H. W. Wookey 250 00 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

Gordon S. Foulds 200 00 

R. M. Janes ( paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

J. C. McClelland 200 00 

R. J. A. McComb 200 00 

J. L. McDonald ( paid also $40 for Extension Work) 200 00 

C. B. Parker (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

Spence Reid 200 00 

T. A. Robinson (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 200 00 

James W. Ross 200 00 

R. H. Thomas (paid also $200 in Health Service) 200 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

H. G. Armstrong 150 00 

J. W. Brennan 150 00 

W. G. Carscadden (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 150 00 

J. H. Couch (paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course) 150 00 

C. R. B. Crompton 150 00 

J. T. Danis ( paid also $30 for Post Graduate Course) 150 00 

Chas. W. Harris 150 00 

J. A. McFarlane (paid also $200 in Health Service and $35 for 

Post Graduate Course ) 150 00 

David R. Mitchell 150 00 

D. W. G. Murrav (paid also $20 for Post Graduate Course) 150 00 

D. W. Pratt ...'. 150 00 

E. E. Shouldice 150 00 

R. M. Wansbrough (paid also $25 for Post Graduate Course) 150 00 

C. H. Watson 150 00 

Fellows (part time — Sessional) : 

E. H. Botterell (see also Physiology ) $1,500 — $18.75 1.481 25 

W. K. Welsh (paid also $99 in School of Nursing and $20 for Post 

Graduate Course) $1,200 — $12.50 1.187 50 

W. S. Keith (paid also $5 in School of Nursing) $1.020 — $10.25. . . 1.009 75 

R. C. Laird. $1,020 — $10.25 1.009 75 

H. F. Mowat (see also Anatomy) $1,020 — $10.25 1.009 75 

S. D. Gordon (naid also $35 for Post Graduate Course) 840 00 

F. I. Lewis (paid also $20 for Extension Work and $50 for Post 
Graduate Course ) 700 00 

A. W. Farmer 600 00 

Fellows (Resident — Sessional • : 

F. G. Kergin 400 00 

T. R. Sarjant -100 00 

S. A. Thomson 400 00 



$9,105 00 



228 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Assistant Fellows < Resident — Sessional) : 

C. Aberhart 300 00 

W. S. Anderson 300 00 

Dr. Jessie Gray 300 00 

J. R. F. Mills 300 00 

T. S. Perrett 300 00 

F. B. Plewes 300 00 

J. F. Roberts 300 00 

F. R. Wilkinson 300 00 

G. F. Pringle. Laboratory Technician, $1,080 — $11 1.069 00 

Miss T. W. McLaren, Secretary, $1,320 — $14 1,306 00 



$31,399 00 



Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

William A. Scott, Professor $1,000 00 

Assistant Professors: 

N. D. Frawley 300 00 

H. B. Van Wyck (paid also $100 in School of Nursing) 300 00 

R. W. Wesley 300 00 

J. A. Kinnear, Associate, Obstetrics 250 00 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

W. G. Cosbie 200 00 

W. W. Lailey 200 00 

Donald M. Low 200 00 

S. J. N. Magwood (paid also $100 in Health Service) 200 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

Lionel T. Armstrong 150 00 

W. A. Dafoe 150 00 

H. W. Johnston 150 00 

Kent Manning 150 00 

W. T. Noonan 150 00 

Frank O'Learv 150 00 

G. Leslie Watt 150 00 

Fellows (Sessional) : 

D. Nelson Henderson. $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

John Mann 1,000 00 

J. C. Goodwin 500 00 

Miss M. Bonham. Laboratory Technician, $1,100 — $11.25 1,088 75 

Miss Hilda Carson. Secretary 900 00 

Ophthalmology 

W. H. LowTy, Professor 700 00 

Associates: 

F. A. AylesAvorth 200 00 

C. E. Hill ( paid also $10 in School of Nursing) 200 00 

Mortimer Lyon 200 00 

W. W. Wright 200 00 

A. E. MacDonald ( part time) $1,200 — $12.50 1,187 50 

J. F. A. Johnston, Assistant ( Sessional — paid also $296.75 in Pharma- 
cology ) $800 — $8 792 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

H. M. Macrae 200 00 

A. L. Morgan 200 00 

W. R. F. Luke (without salary) 

Miss Mary Gray. Secretarial Assistant (<i $1,000, of which half charged 

to Oto-Laryngology ( 500 00 

Oto-Laiyngology 

Perry Goldsmith, Professor (paid also $15 in School of Nursing) $700 00 

G. M. Biggs, Associate Professor " 350 00 

A. A. Campbell, Associate 250 00 

Senior Demonstrators ( Sessional > : 

H. H. Burnham 200 00 

C. A. Rae 200 00 

D. E. S. Wishart 200 00 

Junior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

H. W. D. McCart 150 00 

Gregor McGregor 150 00 

G. C. Snell 150 00 



$8,972 50 



$4,379 50 



150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


1.730 62 


500 00 


500 00 



$8,401 25 
Less paid by Canadian National Committee for Mental Hygiene.... 2.582 50 



Medical Jurisprudence 
M. M. Crawford. Associate (ob. 14 May — salary paid to Estate) $250 00 

Radiology 

G. E. Richards, Professor 

A. C. Singleton, Associate (paid also $35 for Post Graduate Course) . 
Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

M. R. Hall (paid also $35 for Post Graduate Course) 

A. H. Rolph 

A. D. Irvine. Assistant (part time — Sessional) 

Research Professor 
Sir Frederick Banting: ( paid $5,000 in Special Researcl; ) 



$5,530 62 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 229 

W. Berkeley Stark 

J. G. Strachan 

Joseph A. Sullivan 

P. E. Ireland (full time — paid also $5 in School of Nursing) 

$1,750 — $19.38 

A. M. McLeod (half time) 

Miss Mary Gray, Technician (see also Ophthalmology) 

Therapeutics 

R. F. Farquharson. Assistant Professor (see also Department of Medi- 
cine) $1,000 — $15 

H. J. Shields, Associate in charge of Anaesthesia 

W. J. Gardiner, Associate in charge of Physical Therapy (paid also 

$500 for Extension Work) 

C. E. Cooper Cole. Senior Demonstrator, Therapeutics (Sessional) . 
Junior Demonstrators. Anaesthesia (Sessional) : 

W. Easson Brown 

S. M. Campbell 

H. S. Douglas 

S. J. Evelyn 

Ralph Hargrave 

C. H. Robson 

Assistants, Anaesthesia (without salary) : 

G. Rupert Balfour 

Norman B. Clark 

A. Ralph Wilkins 

Assistants, Therapeutics (Sessional) : 

F. C. Heal 

A. J. Kerwin 

J. C. Sinclair 

M. B. McGilli%Tay. Research Fellow, 8 mos 

Psychiatry 

C. B. Farrar, Professor (paid also $100 in Health Service) $5,000 — 

$77.50 $4,922 50 

E. P. Lewis. Assistant Professor, $1,900 — $21.25 1,878 75 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

G. W. Anderson (paid also $100 in Psychology) 150 00 

Dr. Mary V. Jackson 150 00 

B. T. McGhie 150 00 

C. G. Stogdill (paid also $100 in School of Nursing) 150 00 

C. H. McCuaig ( on leave of absence) 

Fellows ( Sessional ) : 

J. A. Hannah. Neuropathology 1.000 00 

K. G. Gray. Forensic Psychiatry (without salary) 

Miss A. F. Abbott. Secretarial Assistant ( without salary ) 



$985 00 


250 00 


250 00 


200 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


150 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


800 00 


$3,535 00 



$.5,818 75 



$2.50 00 
250 00 

200 00 
200 00 
500 00 


$1,400 00 









230 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Special Lectures 

Professor J. H. Elliott, History of Medicine (see also Department of 

Medicine) 700 00 

Special Lecturers (Sessional): 

E. J. Pratt, English (paid also $360 in Dentistry, $300 for Extension 

Work, and $30 in Ontario College of Education » 400 00 

Arnold D. Mason, Dentistry (see also Faculty of Dentistry I $100 — 

$1.86 98 14 

Science and Civilization: 

A. F. Coventry ( paid in Biology ) 

H. Wasteneys ( paid in Bio-Chemistry) 

J. G. Falconer, Life Insurance 

G. S. Young. Medical Ethics and Economics 

1,198 14 



Less charged to: 

Rockefeller Fund $51,979 96 

Eaton Endowment 27,017 00 

$78,996 96 



$331,520 93 



54a. Post Graduate Courses 
Honoraria to Instructors ($530 ) : 
Surgery: 

W. G. Carscadden $20 00 

J. H. Couch 25 00 

J. T. Daniels 30 00 

S. D. Gordon 35 00 

R. R. Graham 20 00 

M. R. Hall 35 00 

R. I. Harris 20 00 

R.M.Janes 20 00 

F. I. Lewis 50 00 

J. A. MacFarlane 35 00 

D. W. G. Murray 20 00 

C. B. Parker 20 00 

D.E.Robertson 25 00 

T. A. Robinson 20 00 

E. H. Shannon 30 00 

N. S. Shenstone 20 00 

A. C. Singleton 35 00 

R. M. Wansbrough 25 00 

W. K. Welsh 20 00 

G. E. Wilson 25 00 

W. E. Gallic, sundry expenses in connection with course: Luncheon to 

class, $24.55; gratuities to assistants, $40 64 55 



$252,523 97 



$594 55 



55. Anatomy 
Anatomical material ($2,918.36) : 

E. E. Bolton $600 00 

Canadian Industrial Alcohol Co 99 76 

E. Cullen 37 10 

Eric Glaesner 140 00 

C. Hunt 80 00 

Lever Bros 148 64 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works 21 78 

F. W. Matthews Co 1,042 95 

Adam Rouilly & Co 426 31 

Robt. Simpson Co 32 52 

Accounts under $10 (4) 20 40 

Prof. J. C. Boileau Grant, models 72 25 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $55.62; labour. $84.24; material, 

$56.79 196 65 

General supplies, equipment and incidentals ($2,589.81) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 141 33 

Art Metropole. drawing paper, etc 30 04 

Associated Screen News, lamps, rewinders and view finders 44 00 

B. J. Bach, film prints 11 45 

W. E. Briggs, drawings 36 25 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



231 



Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory coats 

Eastern Dairies, milk powder 

Eastman Photographic Stores, tissue, shutters, etc 

T. Eaton Co.. oilcloth, paint and utensils 

Fritzsche Bros., oils 

Gevaert Co., films, plates, etc 

Gordon, Mackey & Co., towels and cotton 

B. L. Guyatt, utensils 

Johns Hopkins Press, reprints 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, glassware and micro slides 

Kelley Feed & Seed Co., feed 

La Masurier Bros., rebuilding case 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals, etc 

Thos. Pocklington & Co., pens 

Postage 

Ralston Purina Co., dog biscuits 

Riverdale Lumber Co.. lumber 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 

Stephens Sales Ltd., ink 

Toronto Hydro-Electric System, current 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 25 > 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware, $28.40; medical supplies, $18.19; telegrams and 

stationery, $9.92; food supplies and sundries, $62.39 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $36.60; labour. $328.78; material, 
$334.50 

Less credits: Sale of microscopes. $97.50; sale of material. 
Laboratory deposits. $33 



37 50 


60 59 


12 00 


27 89 


30 05 


16 06 


64 27 


40 38 


37 23 


40 89 


137 91 


27 75 


32 80 


190 07 


10 40 


30 00 


143 72 


17 97 


24 60 


12 24 


10 27 


389 01 


114 36 


118 90 


699 88 



,508 17 
230 50 



56. Pathology and Bacteriology 

Supplies and apparatus ($4,811.63) : 

Academy of Medicine, reprints $17 40 

John Allen, meat 57 16 

American Journal of Cancer, reprints 10 32 

American Medical Association, subscriptions 72 35 

Art Metropole, micro lamp, etc Ill 66 

W. & T. Avery Ltd.. scale 28 42 

British Drug Houses, chemicals, etc 12 83 

Walter A. Carveth. projection apparatus, microscope Camera, etc.. . 1,055 02 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. laboratory coats 36 92 

Diamond Cleanser & Soaps Ltd.. soap 22 68 

Eastman Kodak Stores, prints, chemicals, etc 63 80 

Eastman Photographic Stores, film paper 110 24 

T. Eaton Co., curtains, mats and utensils 63 77 

Wm. F. Fell Co.. reprints 14 90 

Fitzgerald-McAvoy, wire baskets 50 88 

Gevaert Co.. lantern plates, etc 44 25 

Giles. Rice & Peters, refrigerator service 95 75 

J. F. Hartz Co., chemicals, slides and sterilizer controls 123 73 

Hoffman-La Roche Ltd., chemicals 13 43 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, glassware, tubing etc 1,035 62 

O. H. Johns Glass Co.. glassware 14 34 

Journals of Infectious Diseases, reprints 11 66 

Kilgour's Ltd., paper 11 97 

Lea & Febiger. reprints 35 22 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian Corporation, gas 64 00 

Lockhart's Camera Exchange, lantern slides 10 50 

James McTamney Co., redeeming stolen microscope 15 00 

Medical Research Dept.. animals 49 50 

Mimeograph Co.. ink, paper, etc 32 68 

C. V. Mosby & Co.. reprints 20 78 

N. V. A. Oasthocks, prints 19 35 

Postage 64 00 

Robbins & Townsend, rebuilt typewriter, $80; overhauling type- 
writer, and inspection, $59.05 139 05 

S. Simonsky. redeeming stolen microscope 20 00 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. reprints 109 00 



$5,277 67 



232 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



12 00 

120 00 

212 65 

37 40 

30 38 

25 85 

219 42 

86 77 

12 00 

99 60 

297 38 

309 63 

20 52 

350 00 

105 41 

16 75 

37 56 

6 75 

3 10 

225 00 

870 41 



Sterling Rubber Co., rubber gloves 

Stevens Companies, cotton 

Toronto General Hospital, laundry 

Howard Tredale, baskets 

Wilson Scientific Co., micro slides 

Winthrop Chemical Co., chemicals 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under SIO '18) 

Caretakers overtime services, H. Vickery 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery, etc., $13.82; hardware, $39.03; food supplies, $46.75 
Superintendent's Dept., freight. $25.52; labour. $128.93; material. 

$142.93 

Museum supplies ($849.72) : 

Art Metropole. jars 

Wm. Bryce. text books 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., micro camera 

J. F. Hartz Co.. chemicals 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. shelving 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $2.61 ; material, 49c 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss M. Walkden, 3 mos 

Alterations in laboratory: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $544.79; material, $325.62 

Neuropathology : 

Supplies and apparatus ($492.09) : 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 

Dictaphone Sales Corporation, inspection 

J. F. Hartz Co., rubber gloves, glassware and chemicals 

Ingram & Bell, cover glasses, etc 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian Corporation, gas 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., steel cabinet 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend. typevkriter inspection 

Toronto General Hospital, laundry 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 < 7 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $2.64; material, $20.27 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $233.65; sale of material. $61.25 

57. Pathological Chemistry 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundrv- $99 99 

British Drug Houses, chemicals, etc 158 78 

Cambridge University Press, reprints 22 26 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals 16 64 

Canadian Laboratory .Supplies, chemicals, glassware and tubing.... 130 67 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, micro units, etc 609 24 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 60 75 

Dewey & Almy Chemical Co.. chemicals 45 00 

Giles. Rice & Peters Ltd.. refrigerator service 22 64 

Dr. W. Junk, reprints 31 99 

Medical Research Dept.. animals 169 50 

Robt. Mitchell Co.. colorimeter 225 00 

Pfanstiehl Chemical Co.. chemicals 12 71 

Roneo Co.. ink. pads and stencils 16 75 

Arthur H. Thomas Co., slide traps, balance and capsules 25 73 

University Press, printing and stationery 60 67 

Accounts under $10 ( 21 ) 90 57 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Stationery and postage, $21.50; food supplies, $24.46; sundries. 

$29.04 75 00 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $5.33: labour. $182.07; material. 

$148.47 335 87 

$2,148 76 
Less credits: Laboratorv deposits. $64.50; sale of instruction sheets. 

$69.50 .' 134 00 



16 


42 


16 34 


152 


48 


73 06 


44 00 


45 


00 


11 


00 


12 


60 


47 


28 


22 


56 


28 


44 


22 


91 


$7,248 85 


294 00 



5,953 95 



$2,014 76 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



233 



58. Pharmacy and Pharmacology 
Supplies ($1,792.10): 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware $54 51 

Archives Internationales de Pharmacody Namie et de Therapie. 

reprints 

Bakelite Corporation, bakelite 

Barchard Co., sawdust 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., prisms 

B. D. Breiix, frogs 

Allan Brock, animals 

Canadian Industries Ltd., chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 

Central Scientific Co., rheostat 

J. Fontaine, frogs 

F. W. Humphrey Co., fish 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, instruments, etc 

John McGillian. carrots 

National Drug & Chemical Co.. chemicals, etc 

Ontario Rubber Co., rubber tubing 

Payette & Co.. accumulators 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Queen City Dental Mfg. Co., oxygen 

Ralston Purina Co.. feed 

Scientific Glass Apparatus Co.. thermometers and glassware 

Taber Laundry Works 

Toronto Elevators Ltd., feed 

Vail's Laundry 

Waverley Press, reprints 

West Disinfecting Co., disinfectant 

Wholesale Radio Co.. radio parts 

Willard Storage Battery Sales Service, battery 

L'niversity Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 22 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Food supplies. $12.16; hardware. $14.03; sundries, $9.87 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $7.90; labour, $1.55; materia 

$144.63 

Apparatus ($307.92' : 

K. A. Evelyn, colorimeter 

General Electric Co., filter section, etc 

Rubicon Co.. galvanometer 

A. H. R. Smith, electric pulse and motor material 

Wholesale Radio Co., lamp 

59. Bio-Chemistry ( including Zvmology> 

Supplies and apparatus ($4,952.76) : 

Acme Farmers" Dairy $86 (X) 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 23 99 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 36 49 

J. R. Bickerstaff. worms and fish 10 10 

J. Blood, meat, vegetables, etc 158 90 

Borden Co.. milk powder 29 40 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 263 33 

Cambridge University Press, reprints 48 12 

Canada Packers Ltd.. meat 25 35 

Canadian Industries Ltd., acids 261 78 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals 49 41 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 1.424 61 

Canadian Liquid Air Co., gas and rental of cylinders 51 66 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., polarimeter, etc 125 00 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 21 55 

G. E. Charlton, dogs 20 00 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 43 27 

Bruce F. Crocker, dogs 21 00 

Delamere. Williams Ltd., air conditioner 2.S3 80 

T. Eaton Co., casters, oil. battery, etc 31 .58 

J. F. Hartz Co.. needles, catgut, etc 1 10 02 

Journal of Biological Chemistry, subscription 14 06 

Mead, Johnson & Co.. cod liver oil and yeast 11 27 

Merck & Co.. chemical 535 42 



11 04 


13 80 


30 04 


11 16 


35 00 


238 60 


10 00 


209 21 


12 45 


126 00 


12 80 


26 43 


17 25 


100 19 


26 61 


16 50 


81 45 


29 .50 


128 50 


24 60 


33 21 


15 .50 


12 62 


28 25 


39 94 


37 36 


29 96 


65 86 


123 62 


36 06 


154 08 


105 00 


77 60 


70 20 


50 18 


4 94 


$2,100 02 



234 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



National Drug & Chemical Co., capsules and chemicals 

Photographic Service, slides 

Quinte Milk Products, casein and milk powder 

Richards Glass Co., culture tubes 

St. Lawrence Starch Co.. starch 

Dr. I. A. Schoeller, chemical analysis 

Shawinigan Chemical Co., alcohol 

Toronto Elevator Co.. feed 

Wholesale Radio Co., resistors and wire 

Wilson Scientific Co., chemicals and glassware 

Accounts under $10 ( 14 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Collecting expenses. $14.05; food supplies, $10.49; postage, 

$18.42; telegrams, etc.. $18.53; sundries. $66.65 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $42.48; labour. $48.45; material, 
$430.55 

Special equipment, autoclaves < $367.02 I: 

Central Scientific Co.. autoclaves 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., safety valves 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $319.08; sale of material. $349 94 



34 10 


13 20 


28 71 


11 00 


22 88 


79 95 


64 55 


89 43 


42 40 


110 69 


59 63 


128 23 


520 4S 


361 12 


5 90 


$5,319 78 


[ 669 02 



$4^650 76 



60. Physiology 
Supplies: 

Acme Farmers' Dairy, milk $55 33 

Ayerst, McKenna & Harrison Ltd.. cod liver oil. etc 21 07 

Barchard & Co.. sawdust 20 86 

J. Blood, meat 18 45 

W. E. Booth & Co., films and paper 14 72 

British Drug Houses, acid 35 68 

F. J. Burns & Co., frogs and turtles 31 86 

Cambridge University Press, reprints 28 69 

Canada Packers Ltd.. meat 82 59 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., hardware 310 52 

Canadian General Electric Co.. heater units 11 17 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 67 09 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals, etc 37 70 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, etc 93 79 

Canadian Liquid Air Co.. gas and rent of cylinders 47 85 

Canadian National Carbon Co., batteries 17 80 

Carnahan's Ltd.. chemicals 12 50 

Central .Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 307 15 

Warren E. Collins, soda, lime and chart paper 48 38 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co.. glass 15 24 

Joseph Cooper Ltd.. meat 34 62 

E. Cullen, animals 113 50 

T. Eaton Co., crocks, laboratory coats, gauze, provisions, etc 362 35 

J. A. Fontaine, frogs 40 00 

General Motors Sales Corporation, frigidaire service 15 77 

General Radio Co.. radio parts 23 20 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, syringes, etc 222 84 

Arthur Jackson Machine Tool Co., stop watch repaired 12 63 

Johnson, Matthey Co.. chloride, etc 39 90 

Kelley Feed & Seed Co., feed 45 00 

Langley. Harris & Co., dog biscuits 186 25 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, chemicals 125 42 

Mead. Johnson & Co.. yeast powder 12 76 

Pfansteihl Chemical Co.. starch 34 53 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 47 25 

Postage 30 00 

Presto-0-Lite Storage Battery Co., batteries 51 85 

Rainbow Lantern Slide Co.. slides 58 80 

Bobbins & Townsend. typewriter rental and inspection 17 60 

Tordoff Electric Co.. motor 13 00 

Toronto Elevators Ltd.. feed 11 00 

Waverley Press, reprints 12 30 

University Press, printing and stationery 146 83 

Accounts under $10 (27 I 128 21 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



235 



Sundry disbursements by department: 

Laundry. $302.81; postage, telegrams, etc.. $15.51; hardware 

and sundries. $51.68 370 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $69.50; labour. $69.62; material. 

$282.20 421 32 

$3,855 37 
Less credits: Charged to School of Nursing, $200; laboratory 

deposits, $31.75 231 75 



$3,623 62 



61. HY(:lE^E and Preventive Medicine 

Supplies and apparatus ($1,488.89): 

Art Metropole. micrometer $10 00 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. microscope repairs 88 00 

Connaught Laboratories, chemicals, slides, vaccine, etc 623 75 

General Biological Supply House, slides 16 07 

Gray Coach Lines, hire of coaches to Connaught Laboratories Farms 120 00 

Mimeograph Co., ink, paper and stencils 84 32 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., steel cabinet and guides 12 91 

Ontario Laundry Co 21 48 

Postage 16 00 

Screen & Sound Service, lantern slide cabinet and radio mats 39 25 

Harry R. Sparks, field work reports 57 56 

Wilson Scientific Co.. culture tubes 19 11 

University Press, printing and stationery 259 89 

Accounts under $10 (11) 37 77 

Sundry disbursements by department 10 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $1.43; labour, $49.83; material, 

$21.52 72 78 

Cleaner. Mrs. Ada Hall, 165y- days 413 75 



$1,902 64 



62. Medicine 

Supplies and chemicals I $980.41 ) : 

Acme Farmers' Dairy, milk 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 

American Medical Association, reprints 

Beckett & Conroy, laboratory coats 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 

Canadian Paclcers Ltd., meat 

Canadian Dental Association, reprints 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals and filter paper 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 

Wm. J. Dawson, reprints 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, etc 

Lea & Febiger. reprints 

Medical Research Dept.. animals and maintenance 

C. V. Mosby Co., reprints 

C. F. Peters Ltd., paper 

Postage 

Ralston Purina Co.. feed 

Geo. G. Renniker Co., reprints 

W. Lloyd Wood, vaccine 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 6 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Food supplies. $5.14; stationerv, etc.. $5.93; sundries. $16.91... 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $11.02; labour. $2.23; material, 

$109.37 

Apparatus < $298.82 ) : 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware etc 

Ingram & Bell, glassware, chemicals, etc 

Johnson. Matthey Co.. dishes, etc 

Photogranhic .Service, slides 

Arthur H. Thomas Co.. lactic acid apparatus 

Toronto General Hospital, slides, etc 

Accounts under SIO (8) _— • 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. 81c; labour. $79..5.'): material, $27.72 



$24 65 
35 18 
79 21 
10 90 

33 30 

34 59 

13 17 
132 32 

10 10 

15 17 
74 72 

33 37 
132 00 

11 44 

14 80 
10 00 

16 84 
14 17 
16 75 
82 75 

34 38 

27 98 
122 62 



30 53 
32 15 

23 64 

24 00 
26 70 
11 21 
42 53 

108 06 



236 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Books and periodicals < $725.56 ) : 

McAinsh & Co.. reprints 26 20 

Thos. Nelson & Sons, renewal paper 15 17 

H. W. Purver, reprints 19 50 

University Press, printing and stationery 651 21 

Accounts under $10 (3) 13 48 

Laboratory cleaning ($501.20) : 

Miss E. Bailev. 53 weeks, 1 day 334 95 

R. Wilson, 17% weeks 166 25 

( Charged to Eaton Endowment) $2,505 99 

63. Paediatrics 

Supplies and cliemicals i $942.07 ) : 

American Medical Association, reprints $29 09 

Borden Co., milk powder 12 55 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 48 34 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 183 34 

Canadian Medical Association, reprints 11 40 

L. J. Cartwright. prints and slides 93 40 

Matheson Co., chemicals 38 84 

Mead, Johnson & Co.. yeast powder 63 70 

C. V. Mosby Co., reprints 62 75 

Quinte Mill Products, casein 72 50 

St. LawTence Starch Works, starch 13 13 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, reprints 11 84 

L^niversity Press, printing and stationery 37 56 

Accounts under $10 (9l 48 94 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Express and postage. $8.20; stationery, etc.. $6.40: food supplies 

and sundries, $25.36 39 96 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $33.13; labour, $8.35; material, 

$233.25 174 73 

Apparatus ($762.01 1 : 

Aluminum Goods Ltd.. dishes 30 00 

Art Metropole, oculars 11 76 

W. E. Booth Co., meter 16 00 

Breeding & Laboratory Institute, feeding jars 14 42 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware and chemicals 399 20 

Central Scientific Co.. bottles 4 90 

Frober-Faybor Co.. bio-photometer and stand 238 36 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $28.87; material. $18..50 47 37 

$1,704 08 

Less credits for sale of material 243 20 

(Charged to Eaton Endowment i $1,460 88 

64. Surgery 
Supplies and apparatus (1868.87) : 

Academy of Medicine, postcards and printing re meetings $13 74 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 19 34 

Burke Electric & X-Ray Co., repairs 14 25 

Connaught Laboratories, maintenance of animals 22 95 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 64 95 

T. Eaton Co., photographic supplies 44 77 

Grand & Toy, stationery 13 90 

J. F. Hartz Co., chemicals, glassware, etc 19 05 

International Books Ltd., subscription 20 00 

Julian Sales Ltd., brief case 11 00 

Lockhart's Camera Exchange, films, plates, etc 37 23 

H. McCormick, preparing material for class work 15 00 

Medical Research Dept.. animals 127 00 

Mimeograph Co., stencil paper 11 03 

C. V. Mosby Co., subscription 10 66 

Price Teller Machine Mfg. Co.. nail driver and nails 54 51 

Seemor-Selmor System Ltd.. showcase 20 79 

St. Michael's Hospital, surgical supplies 45 40 

Stephens Sales Ltd., paper and roller 22 80 



21 


75 


89 


74 


15 


15 


58 


29 


65 


57 


30 


00 


177 


24 


20 00 


20 


27 


3 


59 


S281 


48 


65 


00 


57 


98 


15 


00 


15 00 


33 


15 


17 


71 


45 56 


2 


06 



$11 31 


82 


45 


30 00 


21 


00 


$78 00 


15 


04 


82 


50 


2 


42 


15 00 


14 


17 


3 


42 


32 


59 


6 20 



$532 94 



$3 50 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 237 

Taylor Instriinient Co.. inslninient repairs 

Toronto General Hospital, surgical supplies 

W. R. Woodruff, mounts 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (15) 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Stationery, telegrams, etc.. $12.98; sundries, $17.02 

Museum of Applied Anatomy ($221.10) : 

Lockharts Camera Excliange, plates, paper, synchronizer, etc. 

Pathology Dept., auto focus enlarger 

Accounts under $10 (3) 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

$1,089 97 

65. Obstetrics and Gynaecology 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Ingram & Bell. X-Ray machine, slide boxes and repairs to model. 

Stephen Jones, films, etc 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., cabinet and guides 

Photographic Service, lantern service and slides 

Postage 

W. R. Woodruff, copies of lectures 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 7 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

66. Ophthalmology 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Thos. W. Andrews, typewriter repairs $3 50 

67. Oto-Laryngology 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Central Scientific Co.. slide boxes 

Connaught Laboratories, animals and maintenance 

Photographic Service, slides 

Accounts under $10 (6* 

68. Therapeutics 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., slide cabinet 

Postage 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. rebuilt typewriter 

University Press, printing and stationery 

69. Psychiatry 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Canadian Medical Association, reprints 

Geo. G. Renneker Co., reprints 

Accounts under $10 (2) 

Less credits for sale of reprints 

70. Medical Jurisprudence 
(Nothing spent) 

71. Radiology 
Supplies and apparatus: 

Toronto General Hospital, X-Ray supplies $1,000 00 

.Art Service 
(a) Salaries: 

Miss M. T. Wishart, Director, $2,500 — $30 $2,470 00 

Miss D. Foster, Assistant Artist, $1,300 — $13.75 1.286 25 

(bl Expenses: 

Part-time assistance ($100): 

Miss E. Blackstock, 179 hours 89 50 

Miss A. Cartwright. 35 hours 10 .50 



$144 76 



$177 96 



$26 39 



$1,000 00 



238 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



56 09 
19 20 
33 32 
24 20 
10 49 

47 00 
18 23 


$4,064 78 
17 29 



Supplier. ( $208.53 i : 

Art Metropole. table achro and drawing paper 

N. Hornyansky. copper plate 

Kern & Co.. negocoll 

University Press, printing and stationery , 

Accounts under $10 ( 3 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Laundrv. $10.88; stationery, art supplies and sundries, 

$36.12 ._. 

Superintendents Dept.. labour, $(.45: material, $10.78.... 

Less sundry credits 



73. General Expenses 

Office supplies, stationery, printing, etc. ( $1,923.44 ) : 

Photographic Service, prints and slides $86 46 

Postage 353 70 

Remington-Rand Ltd.. tube inserts 26 25 

Robbins & Townsend. overhauling typewriters, etc., and inspection.. 62 50 

Simmons c& Sons, funeral wreaths 50 00 

Trans-Canada Press. "Canadian Who's Who" 15 00 

Lnderwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. typewriter rental 10 00 

Universitv Press, printing and stationery 942 41 

Accounts' under $10 (10 I 56 42 

Sundry disbursements by Secretary: 

Carefare and postage. $5.78; telegrams, etc., $13.89: sundries, 

$15.33 35 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $20.94; material, $16.01 36 95 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss D. Waugh, 9 weeks (paid also $100 from Medical Research. 

Best Fund) 225 00 

Mrs. F. P. Lloyd, 5 hours 3 75 

A. McClary, messenger service. 2 weeks 20 00 

Publications. Callendar. Dean's Report, Medical Bulletin and Lister 
Lecture ( $930.58 1 : 

Postage 104 40 

University Press, printing and stationery 826 18 

Maintenance and equipment of Lecture Theatre ($23.34) : 

Art Metropole. lens 1 81 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 21 53 

Medals (36.41): 

Birks. Ellis, Ryrie Ltd.. engraving 6 69 

John Pinches, medals 29 72 

Association of American Colleges: 

Membership fees 150 44 

74. Medical Buld:nc 

Heat and light $4,387 27 

Gas. water and occasional fuel ($1,628.83) : 

Gas. .$649.80; water. $922.56 1.572 36 

Central Coal Co 56 47 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 146 46 

Cleaning ($2,031.90): 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 76 44 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 21 12 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1.934 34 

Repairs and renewals ($3,054.22) : 

"T.G."' Engineering Sales, grates $36 00 

Accounts under $10 (5) 32 03 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $2,225.17; material. $761.02 2.986 19 

Caretaker. F. P. Mottram. 12 mos. (including attendance at Council 

meetings) $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

$12,633 68 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 4,387 27 



$4,047 49 



,064 21 



i,246 41 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 239 

75. Banting Institute 

Heat. Dept. of Public Works. Province of Ontario $6,000 00 

Gas. $741.04; electric current, $4,785.22; water. $482.38 6.008 64 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 453 54 

Cleaning ($5,197.33 I: 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 107 80 

Allen -Mfg. Co.. laundry 57 36 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 5,032 17 

Repairs and renewals (S2. 770.08 I : 

Canadian Ice Machine Co.. repairs 35 31 

City Treasurer, elevator license 15 00 

Accounts under $10 < 4 1 23 01 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $2,106.53: material. $590.23 2.696 76 

Caretaker. H. L. ^ ickerv. 12 mos.. $1,500 — $16.25; (and overtime. 

$12.00 ) ; 1,483 75 

821.913 34 

Less credit for cleaning, etc 78 85 

$21,834 49 

76. An.atomical Building 

Heat and light $2,265 96 

Gas, $18 : water. $45.92 63 92 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 259 68 

Cleaning (S 1.800.22): 

Advance \^ indow Cleaning Co 34 30 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 21 48 

Superintendents Dept.. labour 1,744 44 

Repairs and renewals ($675.78^ : 

Art Window Shade Co.. shades 65 

City Treasurer, elevator license 10 00 

Johnson Temperature Regulating Co.. repairs 11 88 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $493.14; material $160.11 653 25 

Caretaker. M. J. Shepherd. 12 mos., $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

$6,450 56 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . . $2,265 96 

Credit for cleaning 5 00 

2.270 96 

$4,179 60 

77. Hygiene Building 

Heat and light $13,857 23 

Gas. $1,041.68; water, $2,552.71 3.594 39 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 688 69 

Cleaning ($7,555,771 : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 69 60 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 60 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 7.426 17 

Repairs and renewals ($2,012,311 : 

Art Window Shade Co.. repair 75 

City Treasurer, elevator license 20 00 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co.. tiling 50 95 

Johnson Temperature Regulating Co.. repairs 19 64 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,440.33: material. $480.64 1.920 97 

Caretaker. J. Irwin. 12 mos.. $1.400 — $15; (and overtime. $10.50 > 1.385 00 

$29,093 39 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . $13,857 23 
Credits for cleaning, and for share of gas, water 

and electric current 5.800 06 

19.657 29 

$9,436 10 

Charged to Revenue. 1936-37 $333,425 76 

Charged to Eaton and Rockefeller Funds 82.963 83 

$416,389 .59 



240 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

VII. SCHOOL OF HYGIENE 

78. Salaries 

(1) Administration: 

J. G. Fitzgerald, Director. # $5,000 (on leave of absence without 

salary from 1 Oct.) $1,250 — $19.38 $1,230 62 

J. Craigie. Secretary (paid also $495 as Assistant Professor (see 

below) and in Connaught Laboratories) $500 ^ $5 495 00 

Keith M. Kerns, Office Assistant (part time — paid also $350 as 

Laboratory Assistant — see below ) 350 00 

( 2 ) Epidemiology and Biometrics : 

R. D. Defries, Associate Director, School of Hygiene, and Professor 
of Hygiene and Epidemiology (see also Department of Hygiene) 

$2,500 — $30 2,470 00 

N. E. McKinnon. Associate Professor, Hygiene and Epidemiology 

( paid also in Connaught Laboratories » $1,000 — $10 990 00 

J. Craigie. Assistant Professor, Epidemiology (see Administration 

above ) $500 — $5 495 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Miss Mary A. Ross, Biometrics. $2,400 — $28.50 2,371 50 

A. E. Berrv. Public Health Engineering (see also Civil Engineer- 
ing : Municipal and Structural ) $500 — $5.45 494 55 

Special Lecturers ( Sessional) : 

F. Adams 26 45 

R. E. Holmes 22 85 

D. V. Currey 20 00 

K. F. Brandon, Fellow, Epidemiology, @ $2,000, 5 mos. to 30 Nov. 

(resigned) $833.33 — $9.37 823 96 

Clinical Associates, Epidemiology (Sessional — part time): 

J. T. Phair (paid also $40 in School of Nursing and $10 for 

Extension Work) 300 00 

A. L. McKay 250 00 

A. H. Sellers. Demonstrator. Biometrics (Sessional — paid also in 

Connaught Laboratories ) $350 — $3.50 346 50 

Laboratory Assistants, Biometrics: 

S. Raven 890 00 

Miss S. R. McCausland 768 00 

Walter Moore 660 00 

Keith M. Kerns (see also above) 350 00 

Robert Randall, Secretary, $1,050 — $10.63 1,039 37 

(3) Physiological Hygiene: 

C. H. Best, Acting Head of Department (without salary — see also 

Department of Physiology) 

Assistant Professors (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) : 

D. L. McLean. $2,900 — $36 2,864 00 

E. W. McHenry, $1,100 — $11.25 1,088 75 

J. G. Cunningham, Lecturer, Industrial Hygiene (Sessional) 1,000 00 

Research Associates: 

H. M. Barrett. $2,600 — $31.56 2,568 50 

Mrs. Ruth C. Partridge, fft $2,100 of which $1,100 charged to 

Medical Research, Best Fund, $1,000 — $12.75 987 25 

Research Assistants: 

Miss E. G. Gavin. $1,600 — $17.50 1,582 50 

A. P. Hands, Industrial Hygiene, 7 mos 400 00 

Miss E. L. Mahon. Secretary, $1,200 — $12.50 1.187 50 

C. R. Cowan. .Senior Technical Assistant, (n^ $1,900, of which $400 

charged to Medical Research, Best Fund, $1,500 — $17.25 1.482 75 

Technical Assistants: 

W. Staples 950 00 

Miss N. Thompson 850 00 

J. Scattergood (paid also $42.81 from Medical Research, Best 

Fund) 500 00 

C. L. Skelding (paid also $250 from Medical Research, Best 
Fund) 500 00 

(4) Chemistry in Relation to Hygiene: 

P. J. Moloney. Associate Professor (paid also in Connaught 

Laboratories) $4,000 — $57.50 3,942 50 

Miss E. M. Taylor. Demonstrator (part time — Sessional; paid also 

in Connaught Laboratories) $500 — $5 495 00 

Miss M. D. Smith, Class Assistant (part time — Sessional; paid also 

in Connaught Laboratories) $200 — $2 198 00 

Carlton Marter. Secretary and Technical Assistant 540 00 

George Kimm. Technical Assistant 780 00 

$36,310 55 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 241 

79. Maintenance OF Department 

( 1 ) Administration ( $596.06 1 : 

Canadian Public Health Association, advertising $39 51 

Postage 30 00 

Telephone service 388 80 

University Press, printing and stationery 118 82 

Accounts under $10 (31 18 93 

(2.) Epidemiology and Biometrics ($434.31) : 

Canadian Public Health Association, reprints, etc 17 38 

John W. Garlock. paper cutter 15 30 

International Business Machines, maintenance service 30 20 

Mimeograph Co., stencils, paper, etc 70 18 

Postage ^ 40 00 

Screen & Sound Service, cabinet 37 00 

Lniversity Press, printing and stationery 195 13 

Accounts under $10 ( 6 > 29 12 

(3) Physiological Hygiene ( $417.84 >: 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals 23 78 

Connaught Laboratories, animals, glassware, etc 357 95 

Accounts under $10 ( 5 » 20 30 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $7 ; material. $8.81 15 81 

(4» Chemistry in Relation to Hygiene I $716.66) : 

British Drug Houses, chemicals, etc 28 38 

Central Scientific Co.. glassware, etc 34 70 

R. H. Chappell. glassblowing 45 25 

Mimeograph Co.. paper 12 15 

Wilson Scientific Co.. chemicals and glassware 299 12 

University Press, printing and stationery 18 00 

Accounts under $10 (2 ) 6 12 

Cleaner, Mrs. Ada Hall, 97 days 242 50 

Sundry disbursements by department 10 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, .09c; labour. $12.78; material. $7.57 20 44 



$2,164 87 
Paid by School of Nursing 400 00 



VHI. FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE 
80. Salaries 

Dean's Office 
C. H. Mitchell. Dean, $6,000 — $102..50 $5,897 50 

Electrical Engineering 

H. W. Price. Professor, $5,500 — $90 $5,410 00 

A. R. Zimmer, Associate Professor. $4,200 — $61.50 4,138 50 

Assistant Professors : 

V. G. Smith. $3,450 — $46.50 3.403 50 

B. deF. Bayly. $2,850 — $35.25 2.814 75 

R. J. Brown. Lecturer ( Sessional I $1,900 — $21.25 1.878 75 

J. E. Reid, Instructor (Sessional ) $1,500 — $16.25 1.483 75 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

J. W. Bell. $1,050 — $10.63 1.039 37 

C. A. Norris. $1,050 — $10.63 1.039 37 

E. A. Ricker, $1,050 — $10.63 1.039 37 

R. E. Santo 1.000 00 

S. H. Galloway 9.S0 00 

A. U. Houle 950 00 

W. B. Morrison 950 00 

J. W. Lawson. Mechanician, $2,000 — $22.50 1,977 50 

W. R. McKee. Electrician, $2,000 — $22.50 1.977 50 

W. L. Bakewell. Assistant Electrician. $1.0.50 — $10.63 1.039 37 

Office Assistant and Librarian: 

Mrs. G. E. Hammersley, <fi $1,1.50. of which half charged to Civil 
Engineering: Municipal and Structural, 2 mos. to 31 Aug. 

(resigned I $95.84 — $1.00 94 84 

Miss H. L. Redmond. T/ $1,000, of which half charged to Civil 

Engineering: Municipal and Structural. 10 mos. from 1 Sept 416 66 



1,764 87 



(Charged to Rockefeller Fund. Hygiene) $38,075 42 



$5,897 50 



$31,603 23 



242 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Mechanical Engineering 
Professors : 

R. W. Angus, $6,000 - $102.50 $5,897 50 

E. A. Allcut (paid also $420 for Extension Work) $4,500 — $67.50 . . 4.432 50 

Ross Tavlor. Associate Professor. $3,600 — $49.50 3,550 50 

W. G. Mcintosh, Assistant Professor, $3,300 — $43..50 3,256 50 

Lecturers (Sessional f : 

G. R. Lord. $2,350 — $27.75 2,322 25 

T. C. Graham. $L950 — S2L88 L928 12 

R. C. Wiren. $1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

G. H. Hally, $1,800 — $20 1,780 00 

Demonstrators. Thermodynamics (Sessional ) : 

F. G. Ewens ' paid also $862.50 in Special Research — resigned 15 

Apr. I $1.114.30 — $16.52 1,097 78 

C. G. Campbell 1,000 00 

E. B. McRobie (resigned 31 Dec. ) 428 57 

C. A. Miller, 4 mos. from 1 Jan 571 00 

Demonstrators. Hydraulics ( Sessional i : 

E. G. Gallagher 1,000 00 

J. V. Kurtz 1.000 00 

W. R. Sirman (resigned 31 Mar. ) 857 15 

T. J. Brant. ?>V-2 mos. from 8 Jan. (paid also $550 in Special 

Research ) 507 50 

S. C. D. Lawson. Demonstrator, Machine Design (Sessional) $1,150 — 

$11.88 1,138 12 

F. Hickey. Engineer and Machinist. $2,000 — $22.50 1,977 50 

Edward Johnson. Assistant Machinist, 1.140 hrs. (a 70c 798 00 

Earl Burt. Fireman. 1..528 hrs. <a .50c 764 00 

W. Odd. Laboratory Attendant. $1,200 — $12.50 1,187 50 

Miss M. Burt, Office Assistant and Librarian. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 



$38,363 24 



Civil Engineering: Municipal and Structural 

Professors : 

C. R. Young. Civil Engineering. $5,500 — .$90 $5,410 00 

T. R. Loudon. Applied Mechanics. $4,900 — $75.-50 4,824 50 

Lecturers (Sessional' : 

C. F. Morrison. $2,400 — $28.50. Civil Engineering 2,371 50 

W. L. Sagar. $2,400 — $28.50. Civil Engineering 2,371 50 

M. J. C. Lazier. Applied Mechanics. $2,300 — $27 2.273 00 

A. E. Berrv. Special Lecturer. Municipal Engineering (.Sessional — paid 

also $494.55 in School of Hvgiene i $1,000 — $10.80 989 20 

C. E. Helwig. Demonstrator (Sessional I $1,200 — $12..50 1,187 50 

V. Kubbinga. Mechanician 1,000 00 

J. Brown. Laboratory Assistant, 10 mos.. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

Office Assistant and Librarian (see also Electrical Engineering) : 

Mrs. G. E. Hammersley, 2 mos. to 31 Aug. (resigned! .$95.84 — 98c 94 86 

Miss H. L. Redmond, 10 mos. from 1 Sept 416 66 



$22,027 47 



Civil Engineering: Surveying and Geodesy 

W. M. Treadgold. Professor (paid also $562.50 for Summer Camp) 

$4,500 — .167.50 $4,432 .50 

Associate Professors: 

S. R. Crerar (paid also $500 for Summer Camp I $4.000 — $57.50. . . 3,942 50 

E. W. Banting (paid also $475 for Summer Camp i $3,800 — $53.50. 3,746 50 
J. W. Melson (paid also $4.50 for Summer Camp) $.3,600 — $49.50 . . 3,550 50 

T. L. Rowe. Instructor (Sessional — paid also $100 for Summer Camp) 

$1,400 — $15 1,385 00 

E. V. Tidman. Demonstrator, 3 mos 375 00 

C. T. Harding. Mechanician, fa $87.5. of which $450 charged to Applied 

Phvsics (paid also $249.75 in Special Research) $425 — $4.40 420 60 

Miss'R. Cave. Office Assistant and Librarian, (a $1,225. of which $.500 
charged to Applied Phvsics and $100 to Photographic Service) $625 — 
16.52 ' 618 48 

Mining Engineering 

H. E. T. Haultain, Professor, $6,000 — $102.50 $5,897 50 

Associate Professors: 

F. C. Dyer, $4,000 — $57..50 3,942 50 

J. T. King, $4,000 — $57.50 3,942 50 



$18,471 08 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 243 

S. E. Wolfe. Instructor (Sessional » $1,700 — $18.75 1.681 25 

Demonstrators (Sessional): 

S. A. J. Hopper. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

L. F. Gauvreau ( paid also $150 in Special Research » 1.000 00 

E. Tozer. Laboratory Assistant and Mechanician. $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

C. Waybrant. Laboratory Attendant, Assaying. $1,250 — $13.12 1.236 88 

H. J. Reilly, Assistant Mechanician, 32 weeks from 1 Sept 960 00 

Laboratory Helpers @ $12.50 per week : 

D. Edwards. 27 weeks 337 50 

C. Rickard, 27 weeks 337 50 

Office Assistant and Librarian <(i $1,100 per annum: 

Miss V. A. Jordan. 3 mos. to 30 Sept. (resigned* $275 — $2.81 272 19 

Miss J. Bradshaw, 9 mos. from 1 Oct.. $825 — $8.44 816 56 

Miss L. Graydon. 3 weeks '^r $20 60 00 



$22,958 13 



Metallurigcal Engineering 

G. A. Guess, Professor. $5,700 — $95 $5,605 00 

Associate Professors : 

J. A. Newcombe (paid also $360 for Extension Work) $3,600 — 

$49.50 3,550 50 

R. J. Montgomery. Ceramics, $3,600 — $49.50 3,550 50 

J. E. Toomer. Assistant Professor, $3,450 — $46.50 3,403 50 

Hector Ross Laboratory Attendant, 10 mos. (paid also $40 as Messenger) 650 00 
Miss V. M. Johnston, Office Assistant and Librarian, 21 Sept. to 31 May 

(o $65 per month, of which 3/5ths charged to Secretary's Office 218 00 

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry 
Professors : 

J. Watson Bain, Chemical Engineering, $5,500 — 90 $5,410 00 

M. C. Boswell, Organic Chemistry, $4,900 — $75.50 4,824 50 

E. G. R. Ardagh, Applied Chemistry, $4,500 — $67.50 4,432 50 

Assistant Professors : 

E. A. Smith. Chemical Engineering, $3,250 — $42.50 3,207 50 

R. R. McLaughlin. Applied Chemistry. $2,950 — $36.75 2,913 25 

A. M. FitzGerald, Instructor (Sessional) $1,600 — $17.50 1.582 50 

Senior Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

G. P. Beal (paid also $150 in department and $150 in Special 

Research) $1,300 — $13.75 1,286 25 

J. G. Breckenridge (paid also $100 in department) $1,200 — $12.50 L187 50 

W. C. Macdonald (paid also $150 in department) $1,200 — $12.50. 1.187 50 

Demonstrators (Sessional) : 

W. H. Bowman (paid also $445.50 in Special Research) $1,150 — 

$13 : $1,137 00 

G. T. Eaton. $1.150 — $11.88 1,138 12 

G. V. Jansen (paid also $445.50 in Special Research) $1,150 — $13 1.137 00 
W. H. Rapson (paid also $445.50 in Special Research) $1,050 — 

$11.75 1,038 25 

H. Boeschenstein. Instructor, Technical German (Sessional — part time; 

see also German) $700 — $8.40 691 60 

A. S. Hunt, Lecture Assistant and Glassblower. $1,600 — $17..50 1.582 50 

F. Westhead, Laboratory Assistant. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

M. L. Hammond, Lecture Assistant 950 00 

Laboratory Attendants f(i $10 to $15 per week: 

T. .Storton, 52 weeks. 1 day 782 .50 

J. Seymour, 42 Mj weeks 467 50 

E. Livingston. 29% weeks 325 00 

Kitchener Haste. 24 weeks 240 00 

R. Overhoh, 7 weeks 70 00 

R. Obee, 3 weeks 30 00 

Special Lecturers (Sessional) : 

T. Linsey Crossley. Pulp and Paper 100 00 

A. V. DeLaporte. Sanitary Chemistry 100 00 

Miss D. Birkett, Office Assistant and Librarian, ffi $1,200, of which $200 

charged to Secretary's Office. $1,000 — $10.10 989 90 



$16,977 50 



$37,899 62 



244 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

School of Architecture 
Professors : 

H. H. Madill. $4,500 — $67.50 $4,432 50 

E. R. Arthur, Architectural Design. $4,300 — $63.50 4.236 50 

H. J. Burden. Assistant Professor. $3,000 — $37.50 2,962 50 

W. E. Carswell, Lectiuer ( Sessional I $2,350 — $27.75 2,322 25 

Miss J. C. Laing. Librarian and Instructor. Architectural History and 

French, S1.850 — $20.63 '. 1,829 37 

Instructors < Sessional — part time • : 

C. W. Jefferj s. Painting < paid also $40 from University Press) 
$1,500 — $16.25 1.483 75 

F. Coates, Modelling 950 00 

Mackenzie Waters. Special Instructor, Architectural Design, 6 mos 1,000 00 

Special Lecturers ( Sessional — part time) : 

A. S. Mathers, 7 mos 900 00 

W. S. Wilson. Architectural Economics (see also Secretary's Office) 

$250 — $5 245 00 

A. Wardell. Heating and Ventilation (see also Engineering Drawing) 

$200 — $2.40 197 60 

H. B. Dunington-Grubb. Landscape Architecture 200 00 

G. A. Arksev. Attendant in Drafting Rooms. 8 mos 800 00 

Miss E. W. Dyer. Office Assistant, ^CL $780 for 9 mos., of which $330 

charged to Engineering Drawing 450 00 

$22,009 47 



Engineering Draicing 

J. R. Cockburn. Professor. Descriptive Geometrv ' paid also $10 for 

Senate Elections » $4,900 — $75.50 .' $4,824 50 

Associate Professors: 

W. J. Smither. Structural Engineering. $4,000 — $57.50 3,942 50 

W. J. T. \\ right (paid also $295.68 as Special Lecturer. Technical 

English I $3,900 — .$57.18 3.842 82 

Assistant Professors: 

W. B. Dunbar. $2,700 — $33 2,667 00 

A. Wardell. ^/ $2,700. of which $200 charged to School of Archi- 
tecture, $2..500 — $30.60 2,469 40 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

P. V. Jermvn. $2,400 — $28.50 2.371 50 

J. J. Spence, $1,950 — $21.88 1.928 12 

Instructors ( Sessional ) : 

R. M. Clark. $1,475 — $15.92 1.459 08 

G. R. Edwards. $1,475 — $15.92 1,459 08 

Demonstrators ' Sessional ) : 

J. M. Carswell, $1,375 — $14.70 1.360 30 

M. B. Watson, $1,100 — $11.25 1,088 75 

F. T. Taylor 1.000 00 

G. Brown. Attendant in Drafting Rooms. 9 mos.. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

Miss E. W. Dver. Office Assistant (see also School of Architecture) .... 330 00 



$29,831 80 



Applied Physics 

K. B. Jackson, Assistant Professor, $3,250 — $42.50 $3,207 50 

Instructors (Sessional): 

C. A. Booth. $1,500 — $16.25 1.483 75 

V. L. Henderson. $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

Demonstrators: 

W. J. Jackson, $1,300 — $13.75 1.286 25 

L. E. Jones. 3 mos 550 00 

D. H. Hamlv (part time — paid also $519.50 in Botanv and $378.60 

Special Research ) $350 — $3.60 346 40 

Miss R. Cave. Office Assistant and Librarian (see also Civil Engineering: 

Surveying and Geodesy) $500 — $5.30 494 70 

C. T. Harding. Mechanician (see also Civil Engineering: Surveying and 

Geodesy) $450 — $4.65 445 35 



$9,297 70 



Special Lectures 
Special Lecturers (Sessional ) : 

R. R. Grant. Accountancy and Business (paid also $400 for Extension 

Work ) 300 00 

R. E. Laidlaw. Engineering Law 250 00 



< 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



245 



W. J. T. Wright. Technical English (see also Engineering Drawing) 
$300 — S4.32 295 68 

F. H. Kirkpatrick, Public Speaking (paid also |200 for Extension 
Work I 250 00 



Secretary's Office 

^'. S. Wilson. Secretary (paid also $245 in School of Architecture) 

$3,100 — $39.50 ' $3,060 50 

Miss E. Birkett. Assistant Secretary. $1,600 — S17.50 1.582 50 

Miss M. Fenton, Assistant. $1,150 — 811.88 1,138 12 

Stenographers: 

Miss D. Birkett (see also Chemical Engineering I S200 — $2.40 19 1 60 

Miss V. M. Johnston (see also Metallurigcal Engineering) 327 00 



$1,095 68 



81. Electrical Engineering 

Supplies ($2,377,941 : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware $117 96 

Allegheny Steel Co., stampings 164 60 

Aluminum Co.. metal 87 90 

B. C. Ames & Co.. gauge 13 84 

Canada Metal Co.. solder 11 70 

Canada Wire & Cable Co., wire 51 55 

Canadian Durex Abrasives. Ltd., water-proof paper 10 02 

Canadian General Electric Co., mirrors and carbons 42 66 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. dues 23 65 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware 17 46 

Canadian National Carbon Co.. batteries and carbons 98 65 

Canadian Westinghouse Co., tubes and radiotrons 24 21 

Darnell Corporation, casters 19 47 

Diamond State Fibre Co.. tubing, panels, etc 34 98 

Dominion Carbon Brush Co., brushes 20 21 

Driver-Harris Co., wire 149 76 

T. Eaton Co.. brushes and sheeting 24 41 

Electric Insulation & Fibre Co., insulating paper 30 63 

Exide Batteries of Canada, batteries and plates 106 70 

Garage Supply Co., spray gun 10 00 

General Radio Co.. condensers and resistors 289 52 

D. Gestetner Ltd.. stencils 11 30 

George Gorton Machine Co.. tools 16 13 

Hammond Mfg. Co., transformers 19 60 

Leeds & Northrup Co., posts and shield caps 86 98 

Peckover's Ltd.. steel 30 18 

Phillips Electrical Works, wire 58 47 

Photographic Service, prints, slides, etc 25 52 

Postage 17 00 

Pratt, Whitney Co., drills and taps 35 61 

Sangamo Co.. motor repairs 31 10 

Weston Electric Instrument Corporation, terminals, etc .36 78 

Wholesale Radio Co.. radio parts 109 90 

Worr Foundry, castings 16 98 

University Press, printing and stationery 50 38 

Accounts under SIO (21 1 '. 108 97 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Hardware. $15.42; stationery, etc.. S6.54: sundries, $5.49 27 45 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $54.36; labour. $167.22; material. 

$124.13 345 71 

Apparatus ($501.83 i : 

General Radio Co.. condensers 119 64 

Leeds & Northrup Co.. ratio box. etc 160 23 

Weston Electric Instrument Corporation, ammeters, transformers. 

etc 214 62 

Accounts under $10 (2) 7 34 

Furniture, printing and incidentals: 

University Press 97 41 

$2,977 18 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 49 85 



$6,305 72 
$262,738 14 



$2,927 33 



246 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



117 


74 


10 


70 


31 


65 


10 


20 


18 


75 


64 02 


24 00 


18 


74 


34 51 


30 


70 


10 00 


262 02 


19 


17 


24 


57 


75 


10 


63 34 


30 


24 


32 


25 


50 03 


48 


02 




63 


884 53 


18 00 


21 


31 


109 


21 


$2,009 43 


82 


15 



82. Mechanical Engineering 
Supplies ($633.03): 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 

Canadian General Electric Co., rheostat 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, etc 

Central Scientific Co., rheostats 

Arthur S. Leitch, indicator spring 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Co.. oil grease 

Postage 

Scythes & Co., polish cotton 

Thomason-Gordon Ltd., packing 

Accounts under $10 ( 6 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $65.90; material, $1%.12 

Apparatus — Thermodynamics and Aerodynamics ($182.18) : 

American Society of Mechanical Engineers, text books, etc 

Taylor Instrument Co 

Worr Foundry, grate bars 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, 57c; labour, $43.30; material, $19.47 
Apparatus — Hydraulics ($161.17 ) : 

Dominion Bridge Co., plates and angles 

Monarch Belting Co., belting 

Sheldon's Ltd.. exhauster 

Trane Co.. coils 

Superintendent's Dept., freight 

Proportion of fuel for Experimental Plant: 

P. Burns & Co 

Furniture, printing and incidentals ($148.52) : 

Johnson Office Furniture Co., book case 

Photographic Service, blue-prints 

University Press 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits. $2.30; sale of material. $79.85. 



83. Civil Engineering: Municipal and Structural 

Supplies ($482.37): 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware $36 71 

Baldwin, Southwark Corporation, arms targets 47 74 

Photographic Service, blue-prints 31 07 

Postage 36 00 

Llniversity Press, printing and stationery 183 70 

Accounts under $10 (9) 55 71 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $12.47; labour, $14.21; material, 

$M.76 91 44 

Apparatus ($599.40) : 

American Machine & Metals Inc., machine grips 62 28 

B. C. Ames & Co., gauges 112 89 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., scale 124 85 

Dominion Bridge Co., testing frame, etc 114 59 

Garage Supply Co., jacks 11 42 

Hamilton Gear Machine Co., spur 26 00 

McBain Foundry, weights 40 75 

Norton Co., discs 11 35 

Thos. Pocklington Co., sieves 17 00 

Sully Brass Foundry, castings , 17 33 

Accounts under $10 (5) 25 94 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $25.73 ; material, $9.27 35 00 

$1,081 77 

Less credits for sale of manuels 15 40 



84. Civil Engineering: Surveying and Geodesy 
Supplies ($405.19) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 

Art Metropole. steel tapes and folding rules 

Thos. Pocklington Co., transit repairs 

Receiver-General of Canada, prints 

llniversity of Toronto Engineering Society, field books and supplies 
Accounts under $10 (4) 



$1,927 28 



$49 68 


$1,066 37 


190 93 




18 80 




41 88 




; 47 10 




22 24 





UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



247 



Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $7.28; labour. $3.30; material, 

$13.98 

Apparatus: 

Receiver-General of Canada, transits 

Summer Survey Camp — Equipment and Improvements ($172.97) : 

Gurney Foundry Co., range 

J. E. Minto, boat and wharf repairs 

A. R. Moore, lumber for wharf 

Summer Survey Camp — Maintenance ($4,494.70) : 
Instructional Staff ($2,467.65* : 

W. M. Treadgold. services, $562.50; living expenses, $65.95; 

travelling expenses, $20; supplies, $1.60 

S. R. Crerar. services, $500; living expenses, $42.50; travelling 

expenses. $20 ; supplies, $2.60 

E. W. Banting, services. $475; living expenses, $68.75; travelling 

expenses. $20 

J. W. Melson. services, $450; living expenses, $68.75; travelling 

expenses. $20 

T. L. Rowe. services. $100; living expenses, $50 

Sundry expenses ($1,332.05^: 

Harvey Barker, meat 

Britnells Bakeries, bread 

Coleman Lamp & Stove Co., mantles and generators 

T. Eaton Co.. oilcloth, dishes, etc 

A. Fisher, vegetables 

Hewitt Bros., express and cartage 

A. Langdon, stakes 

W. A. Lindop, gas and oil 

Loblaw Groceterias, provisions 

Mrs. J. E. Minto. milk 

T. L. Rowe, cartage 

Mrs. J. C. Turnbuil. milk 

S. W. Welch, provisions and hardware 

Accounts under $10 ( 3 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $2.77; labour, $22.53; material. 

$95.78 

Payments to help ($695) : 

J. E. Minto. caretaker. 12 mos.. $240; ice supply, $35; cutting 

wood. $75 

Mrs. J. E. Minto. cook 

D. Campbell, making fires 

R. Hewitt, making fires 

Less credits: Board at Summer Camp. $1,494.75; laboratory 
deposits, $283 

85. Mining Engineering 
Supplies ($1,967.30) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 

Birks. Ellis, Ryrie Ltd.. repairs to stop watches 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals, glassware, etc 

Codex Book Co.. graph paper 

Denver Fire Clay Co.. chemicals, etc 

T. Eaton Co., stools, step-ladder, utensils, etc 

Fletcher, Russel & Co.. furnace parts 

Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co., rubber belting 

A. S. Hunt, glassware repairs 

Imperial Oil Ltd.. fuel oil 

Johnson, Matthey & Co.. alloys and silver foil 

Morgan Crucible Co.. scorifiers 

Ontario Rubber Co., sheet rubber and tubing 

Postage 

Railway Power Engineering Corporation, cement 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 

Sturtevant Mill Co.. discs 

W. S. Tyler Co.. blotting paper and screens 

University Press, printing and stationery 



10 00 


24 


56 


375 00 


82 08 


63 65 


27 


24 


650 05 


565 


10 


563 


75 


538 


75 


150 00 


14 


40 


30 85 


16 


40 


79 31 


71 


65 


63 


15 


12 


15 


54 95 


607 


61 


72 00 


25 


00 


49 00 


109 


90 


4 60 



121 08 



350 00 

325 00 

10 00 

10 00 



J5.447 86 
1,777 75 



$74 03 

11 50 
19 46 

263 53 

117 78 

10 14 

208 64 

63 70 

94 98 

22 99 

12 25 
29 85 
38 93 
71 07 
24 40 
40 00 
10 00 
21 00 
16 67 

23 84 
303 45 



,670 11 



24S 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Accounts under $10 113) 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Carfare, $6.25; hardware, $8.27; stationery, $21.39; sundries 

$10.82 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $111.06; labour. $90.39; material 

$185.51 

Apparatus ( $2,-538.48) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

Wm. Ainsworth & Son, weights 

Baird & Tatlock, balance 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., photomicrographic outfit 

Central Scientific Co., balances, etc 

Corman Engineering Co., electric cast mills 

Denver Fire Clay Co., crucibles, lead, etc 

T. Eaton Co., linoleum 

Gas Accumulator Co., lenses, magnifier, etc 

Leland Electric Ltd.. motors 

Lyman Tube & .Supply Co., steel tube 

W. R. McKee. prometer repairs 

North American Cyanamid Ltd.. flotation machine 

Ronald & Coventry, pulleys, gears, etc 

Schatz Mfg. Co., ball bearings 

Thompson Balance Co., assay weights 

Toronto Welding Co.. castings 

W. S. Tyler Co., testing sieves 

Accounts under $10 1 2 I 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $56.39; material. $32.18 



Less credits: Part payment of photomicrographic outfit by Prof 
Haultain, $250: laboratory deposits. $171.35: sale of material. $10 



86. Metallurgical Engineering 
Supplies ($413,621 : 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., carbons, springs, etc 

Canadian Industries Ltd., acids 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals, glassware, etc 

Eastman Photographic Stores, plates and papers 

Fisher Scientific Co., abrasive powder 

University Library, replacement of books lost 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 10 1 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $1.50; labour, $18.25; material 

$18.15 

Apparatus (.$661,331 : 

Art Metropole. micro lamps 

Adolph I. Buchler, polishing machine 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, crucibles, etc 

Canadian Liquid Air Co., gas 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., microscope parts 

Ontario Research Foundation, ball bearings 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $5: labour. $116.19: material, $80.44 

Less credit for sale of material 

87. Chemical Engineering and Applied Chem strv 
Supplies ($7,459.17) : 

Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co.. corks 

British Drug Houses, chemicals, etc 

Canadian Hanson & Van Winkle Co.. chemicals 

Canadian Industries Ltd., chemicals 

Canadian Kodak Co., chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware, tubing and chemical 

Canadian Liquid Air Co.. rental of cylinders and gas 

Central Scientific Co.. glassware, etc 

Consumers' Gas Co., gas meter rental 

Dominion Oxygen Co., rental of cylinders and gas 

0. W. Herzberg. acids and chemicals 

Ingram & Bell, gylcerine, etc 



55 40 



46 73 


386 % 


36 29 


14 30 


196 93 


644 80 


775 08 


64 80 


34 75 


36 77 


25 00 


169 45 


10 19 


19 85 


85 00 


42 78 


13 22 


120 21 


12 00 


139 28 


9 21 


88 57 


$4,505 78 


) 431 35 


SH 071 l"^ 


$12 78 


65 41 


134 95 


64 74 


12 42 


16 30 


18 96 


50 16 



37 90 



.58 80 


127 48 


55 % 


11 00 


190 50 


15 96 


[ 201 63 


$1,074 95 


19 06 


$1 n5'i RO 


RV 

$59 14 


172 32 


11 00 


949 38 


83 28 


2.329 67 


109 77 


580 71 


12 50 


55 58 


175 95 


13 63 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 249 

Johnson. Matthey Co., platinum wire 1.3 9.5 

Lake Simcoe Ice & Fuel Ltd., ice 49 42 

Liquid Carbonic Canadian Corporation, gas 18 00 

Mclntyre & Taylor, tripods, plates, etc 77 00 

W. R. McKee, motor repairs 25 05 

Merck & Co.. chemicals, etc 424 49 

Milton-Thompson Electric Co., motor 27 50 

National Stationers Ltd.. paper, carbons, etc 30 25 

Nichols Chemical Co.. acids 27 85 

Photographic Service, slides and prints 36 20 

Thos. Pocklington Co.. overhauling balance 15 00 

Standard Chemical Co.. spirits .54 00 

Textile Products Co.. towels 55 89 

Twisswire Brushes Ltd.. brushes 19 80 

Wilson Scientific Co.. glassware, etc 201 87 

Wood. Alexander & James, tools 98 08 

University Press, printing and stationery 267 46 

Accounts under SIO (19 i 99 69 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Hardware. S20.94: stationery, postage, etc.. S28.16; sundries. 

$31.73 ..........'.._. 80 83 

Superintendents Dept.. freight. J45.55; labour. S698.91 : material. 

$539.45 L283 91 

Apparatus ($3,403 83 • : 

Ajax Engineers Ltd.. tanks 117 00 

Art Metropole. repairs to refractometer 42 50 

W. T. Avery Ltd.. platform scale 44 10 

Canadian Johns-Manville Co.. installing still 23 00 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemical balance 274 40 

Consumers" Gas Co., rental, etc.. of steam boiler 15 00 

Corning Glass Works, glassware 30 76 

Coulter Copper & Brass Co.. gaskets 180 00 

J. P. Devine Mfg. Co.. jacketed sulphonator 163 26 

W. & J. G. Greey Ltd., mixer 125 00 

Francis Hankin & Co., calorimeter 139 00 

Maurice A. Knight, parts for absorption tower 108 51 

Milton & Thompson Electric Co., motors 65 00 

Palmer Thermometer Co.. thermometers and cylinder case 29 29 

D. R. Sperry & Co.. filter press 308 45 

L nderwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. type^\Titer 145 80 

West CO Pump Engineering Ltd.. pumps 138 78 

Honoraria re installation of apparatus: 

G. P. Beal 150 00 

J. G. Breckenridge 100 00 

W. C. Macdonald 150 00 

Accounts under SIO ( 3 > 14 .56 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $33.15; labour. $549.73: material. 

$456..54 L039 42 

$10,863 00 
Less credits: Laboratory deposits. $1,1,52: sale of material. $5.25: 

containers returned. $49.50 1.206 



88. School of Architectuhe 

•Supplies ($451.49): 

Artists' Supply Co.. paints, brushes, etc $10 02 

Beaux-Arts Institute of Design, programme service 25 18 

Wm. Dawson Subscription Service, subscription 11 25 

T. Eaton Co., wall board, stools, etc 20 65 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 150 73 

Postage 20 00 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 15 45 

C. L. Todd, subscriptions 11 00 

L^niversity of Toronto Engineering Society, drawing supplies 10 00 

Universitv Press, printing and stationery 73 44 

Accounts' under $10 ( 12 1 ,57 83 

Sundry disbursements by department 17 65 

Superintendent"? Dept.. labour. $12.04: material. $46.25 .58 29 

Apparatus including books ) $185.86: 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. saw motor 60 33 

H. M. .Stationery Office, report 1 48 



$9,656 25 



250 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Robbins & Townsend, typewriter, $95; less allowance on old 
machine. $10 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $24.20; material, $14.85 

Models for Life Class : 

Prof. H. H. Madill. reimbursement for payments made 

Staff expenses — outdoor sketching classes: 

Prof. H. H. Madill, expenses (four members of staff) 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 

89. Engineering Drawing 
Supplies (S358.71I : 

D. Gestetner Ltd.. ink, paper and stencils 

Photographic Service, prints 

University of Toronto Engineering Society, drawing supplies 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under SIO < 10 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $58.51; material, $23.41 

Printing Instruction Sheets ($70.52) : 

D. Gestetner Ltd., paper and stencils 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 

90. Applied Physxs 
Supplies ($.534,301: 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

W. E. Booth Co.. meter, plates and filters 

British Aluminum Co., metal 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware 

Canadian S. K. F. Co., bearings 

T. Eaton Co.. meter, etc 

Imperial Optical Co.. lenses 

Photographic Service, slides, prints and chemicals 

Wholesale Radio Co., radio parts 

Lfniversity of Toronto Engineering Society, drawing supplies 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 11 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $8.38; labour. $53.79; material, 

$49.02 

Apparatus ($1,015.16) : 

Art Metropole. photometer parts and magnifier 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., objectives 

Roy F. Cain, lens 

Canadian General Electric Co., light meter and cell 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. microscope 

General Radio Co.. resistance box, plugs, etc 

Dr. D. H. Hamly. microscope lamp 

Leeds & Northrop Ltd., galvanometer 

W. R. McKee, photronic cell 

Photostat Corporation, lens prism 

Wholesale Radio Co.. radio parts 

L. J. Workman, cameras 

Accounts under $10 (3) 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 

91. General Expenses 

Stationery, printing. Calendar, office supplies and incidentals ($2,096.31) : 

Canadian National Telegraphs 

Roy McCann Typewriter Co.. overhauling typewriter 

Might Directories Ltd., city directory 

National Stationers Ltd.. coupons and chair pad 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Postage 



85 


00 


39 05 


22 00 


101 


75 


$791 


10 


7 00 


$56 


12 


23 


73 


107 


90 


52 21 


36 83 


81 


92 


45 


46 


25 


06 


$429 23 


16 


20 


$44 15 


49 59 


34 65 


12 


68 


16 


80 


24 


70 


16 


00 


97 


33 


10 91 


35 


00 


22 


00 


49 


30 


10 


00 



111 19 



441 


27 


16 


68 


25 


00 


17 


31 


267 20 


56 68 


20 


00 


40 09 


19 80 


60 


43 


13 


46 


25 00 


12 24 


$1,549 46 


62 


80 



$14 31 

13 20 

21 60 

24 55 

278 51 

145 00 



$784 10 



$413 03 



$1,486 66 



UNIVERSITY OF TOROlNTO FOR 1937 251 

Chas. Potter, slide boxes 13 50 

Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd.. typewriter repairs 17 06 

University Press, printing and stationery 1,395 16 

Accounts under SIO ( 5 i 26 75 

Sundry disbursements by Secretary 15 69 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, 50c ; labour, $102.81; material, 

$27.67 ._ 130 98 

Clerical assistance (S78.35I: 

Miss M. V. Johnston. 4-1/3 weeks 65 00 

Mrs. N. Nixon, 2 3 weeks 13 35 

Messenger Service ( S822.50 I : 

A. C. Dvkeman. 52-1 6 weeks 782 50 

H. Ross. 4 weeks 40 00 

$2,997 16 

Less credit from laboratory deposits 125 55 

$2,871 61 

92. Photographic Service 

(a) Salaries: 

Prof. G. R. Anderson, Manager (without remuneration ) 

Photographers : 

C. Crowther. S1.450 — S15.62; (and overtime. 15 ) 1,434 38 

Mrs. Muriel Milne. $1,200 — $12.50 ( and overtime, $9 ) 1.187 50 

Frank Stark, 10 mos. (and overtime. $3 ) 1.000 00 

W. Vance 950 00 

Mrs. R. E. Morley. Bookkeeper. 81,100 — S11.25 1,088 75 

Miss R. Cave, Office Assistant (see also Civil Engineering: Survev- 

ing and Geodesy) $100 — SI .'. 99 00 

Fred Sayer. Messenger and Studio Assistant 600 00 

■ $6,359 63 

(b) Expenses: 
Supplies ($1,573.63) : 

Eastman Kodak Stores, photo supplies and plates $584 40 

Eastman Photographic Stores, photo supplies 201 12 

Gevaert & Co.. chemicals, paper and plates 233 35 

Instruments Ltd.. blue-prints paper 54 80 

National Drug & Chemical Co., chemicals, etc 20 57 

J. Frank Raw Co.. paper and envelopes 34 69 

Rectigraph Co.. paper 225 75 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 79 80 

University Press, printing and stationery 89 85 

Accounts under $10 ( 6 ) 28 09 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $7; material. $14.21 21 21 

Apparatus: 

T. Eaton Co.. camera 51 75 



$1,625 38 
Less credit from material returned 14 32 



NOTE: Receipts for photographic work done for various departments 
(including Accounts Receivable. $178.47 i amounted to $4,493.33. 



93. Mining Building (including Mill Bu'lding) 

Heat and light $7,454 53 

Gas. $926.23 ; water. $384.26 1,310 49 

Caretakers supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 292 59 

Cleaning ($3,5.50.52) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 19 60 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry .38 52 

New York Window Cleaning Co 31 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 3.461 40 

Repairs and renewals ($2,820.28) : 

Art Window Shade Co.. cloth 14 70 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 15 00 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 17 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $1,929.88; mateiial. $843.20 2.773 08 



$1,611 06 
$7,970 69 



252 REPORT OF THE No 12 

Replacement of elevators ($2,320.94 1 : 

Roelofson Elevator Co., elevator 2,192 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $106.48: material. $22.46 128 94 

Caretaker, A. Clarke, Sl,400 — S15 ; (and overtime, $162 I 1,38.5 00 

$19,134 3.5 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . . $7,454 53 

Credit for cleaning, etc 23 38 

■ 7.477 91 

$11,656 44 



94. Engineering Building 

Heat and light $3,262 52 

Gas. 185.99; water, $142.93 228 92 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 198 57 

Cleaning ($1,801.16): 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 19 98 

New York Window Cleaning Co 80 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1,701 18 

Repairs and renewals ($1,923.47) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son, shades 18 65 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $1,257.14; material. $647.68 1,904 82 

Caretaker, F. Baker, 12 mos.. $1,400 — $15; (and overtime. $151.63* 1.385 00 

$8,799 64 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant... $3,262 .52 

Credit for cleaning 191 84 

3.454 36 



95. Electrical Building (including Mechanical Building 
AND Wind Tunnel) 

Heat and light $4,092 98 

Fuel for Experimental Plant ( $1,200 j : 

P. Burns & Co 1,198 91 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1 09 

Gas, $80; water. $398.23 478 23 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 126 88 

Cleaning (Sl.933.21l: 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 22 40 

New York Window Cleaning Co 46 50 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 20 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1.844 31 

Repairs and renewals ($1,821.91): 

Canadian Powers Regulating Co., installing thermostat 71 82 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 10 00 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., tiling 15 19 

Accounts under $10 (3) 4 54 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $1,163.62; material, $556.74 1,720 36 

Caretaker, F. F. Hitchcock, 12 mos.. $1,450 — $15.62 1.434 38 

$11,087 59 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant . . . $4,092 98 

Credit for cleaning 22 50 

4,115 48 



96. Geodetic Observatory Building 

Heat and light S266 13 

Water 16 20 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 12 08 

Cleaning ($125.02) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 4 90 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 120 13 



$5,345 28 



$6,972 11 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 253 

Repairs and renewals (§202. 78 > : 

Routerj- Bros., plaster repairs 4 6.5 

Superintendent"? Dept., labour. $186.64; material, $11.49 198 13 

$622 21 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 266 13 

$3.56 08 

Charged to Revenue, 1936-7 $316,288 36 

Charged to Wallberg Fund 8,683 44 

$324.971 80 
IX. FACULTY OF DENTISTRY 

97. Salaries 
(a) Regular Staff 

A. D. A. Mason, Dean (paid also as Professor i $1,000 — $18.48 $981 52 

Professors : 

A. D. A. Mason, Operative Dentistry <paid also $98.14 in Facultv 

of Medicine and $30 for Extra Mural Lectures) $5,000 — $92.16. '. 4.907 84 

F. M. Lott. Prosthetic Dentistrv (paid also $6 for Post Graduate 

Course I $5,000 — $77.50 4.922 .50 

T. Cowling, Dental Technology and Metallurgy ( paid also $25 for 
Extra Mural Lectures and $6 for Post Graduate Course) $2,000 — 
$22.50 1.977 50 

G. C. Cameron. Dental Pathology and Bacteriology' (^paid also $6 for 

Post Graduate Course) $3,000 — $37.50 2.962 .50 

C. A. Corrigan. Orthodontia (^paid also $98 for Post Graduate 

Course) $2,.500 — $30 2,470 00 

S. S. Crouch. Dental Anatomy (paid also $76 for Post Graduate 

Course and $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) 700 00 

E. W. Paul. Dental Surgery and Anaesthesia 680 00 

F. J. Conboy. Dental Praxis 400 00 

R. Gordon McLean. Dental Praxis 200 00 

I. H. Ante, Crown and Bridge Prosthesis (without salary) 

Associate Professors: 
Dentistr>': 

W. G. Switzer. $4,000 — $57.50 3.942 .50 

H. A. Hoskin, $4,000 — $57.50 3.942 .50 

R. J. Godfrev, ( paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures • $3,800 

— $53.50 3,746 50 

R. G. Ellis. $3,600 — $49.50 3,550 50 

C. A. Kennedy. Orthodontia, also Librarian and Curator of Museum 
(paid also $80 for Post Graduate Course and $99 from Child 

Research I $1.100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

F. A. Clarkson. Medicine 360 00 

Fulton Risdon. Oral Surger>' 180 00 

E. S. Ryerson. Assistant Professor, Surgery (see also Faculty of Medi- 
cine) $400 — $6.50 393 50 

Associates: 
Dentistry: 

S. M. Richardson (paid also $15 for Extra Mural Lecture-^ and 

$6 for Post Graduate Course ) $3,300 — $43..50 3.256 50 

L. F. Krueger (paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) 81.500 

— $16.25 1.483 75 

G. H. Coram. $1,400 — $15 1..385 00 

H. A. Ross .500 00 

G. D. Beierl 750 00 

F. L. Cole (paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) 670 00 

J. H. Duff (paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) 945 00 

W. T. Holmes 1.000 00 

W. L. Hugill 670 00 

G. V. Morton (paid also $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) 670 00 

J. M. Sheldon 670 00 

R. R. Walker 670 00 

R. S. Woollatt (paid also $35 for Extra Mural Lectures) 670 00 

D. M. Tanner ( paid also $292 as Demonstrator, and $25 for 

Mural Lectures ) 50 00 

Miss W. C. Riddle. Histology, Bacteriology and Pathology (paid also 

$15 for Extra Mural Lectures) $2,160 — $24.90 2.135 10 



1.780 


00 


900 


00 


495 00 


292 00 


1.187 


50 


296 


10 


360 00 



254 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

M. A. Cox. Preventive Dentistry 600 00 

J. H. Johnson. Dental Surgery and Anaesthesia (paid also $40 for 
Extra Mural Lectures and $6 for Post Graduate Course) $3,100 — 

$39.50 3,060 50 

C. H. M. Williams. Periodontia i half time — paid also $235 for 

Extra Mural Lectures) $1,208 — $12.60 1,195 40 

Demonstrators. Assistants, etc. i Sessional i : 
Demonstrators: 

G. B. Shillington. Preventive Dentistry (paid also $39.60 in 
School of Nursing and $25 for Extra Mural Lectures) $1,800 

— $20 

J. Kreutzer. Operative and Prosthetic Dentistry 

P. G. Anderson. Dentistry 

D. M. Tanner. Periodontology (see also above ) 

Miss D. F. J. Berry. Preventive Assistant, $1,200 — $12.50 

C. C. Rous. Lecturer. Applied Chemistry and Metallurgy (see also 

Office Staff I S300 — $3.90 

E. J. Pratt. Special Lecturer, English (see also Faculty of Medicine) 
Instructors: 

E. .\L Rigsby. Dental Technology 240 00 

R. S. Hosking. English Expression (paid also $15 in Social 

Science and S200 for Extension Work ) 100 00 

G. L. Assie. French < without salary — paid in Faculty of Arts ) 

Laboratory Assistants : 
Technicians: 

W. V. Byrne, Dentistry, 10 mos., $1,900 — $21.25 1,878 75 

Miss Inez A. Bumby. Bacteriology and Pathology. $1,020 — 

S10.25 

H. F. Whittaker. Histology (part time — see also Anatomy) . 

Mrs. M. Gratton. Histology ( part time I 34 weeks (S' $9 

. H. Aylward, Infirmary. $1,200 — $12.50 

<b* Infirmary Staff (including Nurses) 
Nurses : 

Miss L. A. Cameron. Supervisor. Dental Nurses in Training. 10 

mos.. S1.300 — $13.75 $1,286 25 

Miss L. E. Tutt. 10 mos 900 00 

Miss A. H. Rose. 9 mos 840 00 

Miss F. G. Whitehead. 8 mos 800 00 

Miss M. E. Crerar. 10 mos 700 00 

Miss Muriel Graham. 10 mos 700 00 

Miss A. E. Phipps. 10 mos 700 00 

Miss M. M. Brown. 10 mos 700 00 

R. M. Turner. Instructor in TypewTiting for Dental Nurses 100 00 

Mrs. L. Barracloueh. Laundress, 42 weeks @ $16.45 690 90 

$7,417 15 



1.009 75 




120 00 




306 00 




1.187 50 






$67,939 96 



(c) Office Staff 

C. C. Rous. Secretary (paid also $296.10 as Lecturer I $3,000 — $39.60 . . $2,960 40 

Miss F. A. Cook. Secretary to the Dean. $1,700 — $18.75 1.681 25 

Miss R. C. Hopkins. Assistant to the Secretary. S1.300 — $13.75 1.286 25 

Miss E. B. Mimms. Assistant in Library. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

Miss L. Park Cashier in Infirmary. 10 mos.. $1,100 — $11.25 1.088 75 

Miss Flora Ward. Stenographer 1.000 00 



97a. Post Graduate Coltr-ses 
Honoraria to Instructors: 

C. A. Corrigan, $98; expenses, $2.80 

S. .S. Crouch 

C. A. Kennedy 

Sundry persons 

Hart House, luncheon 



98. Laboratory and Infirmary Supplies. Etc. 



Adam. Rouilly & Co.. skulls 

.\ikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware. 
Art Metropole, drawing paper, etc 





$9,105 40 




$84,462 51 


$100 80 

76 00 

80 00 

36 00 

7 20 


$300 00 


134 13 
11 44 


51 70 





UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



255 



Art Window Shade Co., shades 

Ash Temple Co., dental supplies 

Bausch & Lomb, microscope repairs 

Bio-Chemistry Dept., laboratory supplies 

L. D. Caulk Co., dental compound, etc 

Central Scientific Co., glassware, chemicals, etc 

Chemistry Dept., laboratory and sundry supplies 

Cheney Chemicals Ltd., gas 

Columbus Dental & X-Ray Corporation, dental supplies 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., glass 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 

Denco Ltd., gold 

Dental Co., models 

H. S. Dodd, electrical work, etc 

Dominion Dental Co., sterilizer, etc 

Eastman Kodak Stores, films, chemicals, etc 

T. Eaton Co., chair, scissors, cotton, etc 

Florentine Co., models, etc 

Grand & Toy, desks 

Ed. Green Dental Supplies, dental supplies 

Hall Mfg. Co., laboratory coats 

J. F. Hartz Co., chemicals, glassware, etc 

Hotel & Hospital Supply Co., towels 

Ingram & Bell, sterilizer, stand, etc 

Literlake Tissue Mills, paper napkins 

Johnson & Johnson, absorbent cotton 

Lavoris Chemical Co., lavoris 

Lehn & Fink, lysol 

Dr. F. M. Lott. lettering cards 

W. R. McKee, furnace repairs 

Medico Co., syringes 

Merck & Co., chloroform 

Might Directories Ltd., city directory 

Minneaapolis Honeywell Regulator Co., potentiometer, thermocouples, etc. 

National Drug & Chemical Co., chemicals, etc 

National Refining Co., gold, furnace castings, porcelain, etc 

Ofl&ce Specialty Mfg. Co., cabinets 

Ontario Research Foundation, castings 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Physyics Dept., laboratory supplies 

Thos. Pocklington & Co., paper 

Prophylactic Brush Co., brushes 

Remington-Rand Ltd., typewriters, $245; less allowance on old machines, 

$20 

Miss M. Sewell, wall charts 

Ella Skinner, uniforms 

Smith & Chappie Ltd.. dental plaster 

Wallace C. Sproule, lettering cards 

Stevens Co., surgery light and cotton 

Toronto Dental Dealers, dental supplies 

Ward's Natural Science Establishment, skulls 

University of Toronto Engineering Society, T squares, pencils, paper, etc. 
S. S. White & Co., syringes, dental supplies, connections for operating 

unit, etc 

White X-Ray Surgical Supply Co., mounts 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 27 ) 

Sundry disbursements by Secretary': 

Laundry, $134.35; sundry supplies, $67.66 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $113.60; labour, $2,530.46; material, 

$1,.351.15 



16 00 


1,651 


39 


36 00 


10 


54 


99 03 


296 02 


316 26 


20 00 


84 


72 


12 


82 


251 


73 


2,637 


67 


345 60 


254 


11 


535 


18 


124 69 


233 06 


65 08 


71 


00 


167 64 


42 


46 


272 


58 


32 


62 


93 


24 


250 


50 


257 24 


67 20 


17 


14 


29 00 


14 85 


21 62 


12 


13 


21 60 


162 


26 


366 


79 


3.198 


01 


127 


25 


22 


50 


292 05 


35 85 


16 00 


19 


58 


225 00 


35 00 


512 69 


188 


53 


21 


50 


210 57 


346 


77 


57 


78 


66 45 


2,239 47 


15 


00 


572 


10 


125 


40 



202 01 



3,995 21 



Less credits: Laboratory deposits, $1,644.48; gold sweepings. $49.48 



522,0.50 14 
1,693 93 



$20,356 21 



99. General Expenses 

Stationery, printing. Calendar, office supplies and incidentals ($1,903.39) : 

Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., postal scale $14 37 

C. P. R. Telegraphs 13 18 

Grand & Toy, record book and paper 12 55 



256 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. files, guides, etc 66 98 

Postage 225 24 

Remington-Rand Ltd., typewriter 100 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection and carbon paper 48 80 

University Press, printing and stationery 1.360 04 

Accounts under $10 (4) '. 22 97 

Sundry disbursements by Secretary: 

Telephone calls and stationery supplies 39 26 

Extra Mural Lectures ($1,462.98) : 

Remuneration Expenses 

P. G. Anderson $2.5.00 $ 7.75 

F. L. Cole 25.00 24.10 

T. Cowling 25.00 3.05 

S. S. Crouch 25.00 6.40 

J. H. Duff 25.00 7.65 

R. J. Godfrey 25.00 15.50 

W. L. Hueill 200.00 151.75 

J. H. Johnson 40.00 29.30 

L. F. Krueger 25.00 9.44 

F. M. Lott 15.00 13.25 

A. D. Mason 15.00 16.90 

G. A. Morgan 25.00 11.00 

G. V. Morton 25.00 6.60 

S. M. Richardson 15.00 6.20 

Miss W. C. Riddle 15.00 5.28 

G. B. Shillington 2.5.00 24.50 

D. M. Tanner 25.00. 10.80 

C. H. M. Williams 260.00 180.26 

R. S. Woollatt 35.00 13.25 

American Association of Dental Schools, dues 



Less received from Royal College of Dental Surgeons, account extra 
mural lectures 



100. Dental Building 
Fuel ($1,443.13): 

Elias Rogers Co 

Lyons- Wright Ltd 

Gas, $483.45; electric current, $2,814.15: water. $315.32 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Cleaning r $2,179.40 I : 

New York Window Cleaning Co 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 

Repairs and renewals ($2,383.13) : 

City Treasurer, elevator licenses 

Drummond, McCall & Co., tubes 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co.. tiling 

N. Quesnel, boiler repairs, etc 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 

Accounts under $10 (2 I 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $1..582.07: material. $.583.47, 

Caretaker. Robt. Fades, 12 mos.. $1,400 — $15 

Fireman. .Superintendent's Dept., labour 



Less credit for fuel . 



32 75 


49 10 


28 05 


31 40 


32 65 


40 50 


351 75 


69 30 


34 44 


28 25 


31 90 


36 GO 


31 60 


21 20 


20 28 


49 50 


35 80 


440 26 


48 25 


50 00 


$3,366 37 


1.112 98 


$2,253 39 



$786 40 




656 73 




3.612 92 




585 58 




30 00 




2.149 40 




10 00 




29 16 




13 09 




33 12 




118 90 




13 32 




2.165 54 




1.385 00 




778 37 




$12,367 .53 




3 90 






$12,363 63 




$119,735 74 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



257 



X. FACULTY OF HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

101. Salaries 
( a ) Household Science : 

Professor (with rooms, heat and light valued @ $280 per annum I : 
Miss A. L. Laird. 2 mos. to 31 Aug. @ $4,200 (resigned) 

$700 — $10.25 $689 75 

Miss Jessie Brodie, 10 mos. from 1 Sept. @ $3,800, $3,166.66 — 

$44.58 3.122 08 

Assistant Professors: 

Miss Alice C. Willard, $3,450 — $46.50 3.403 50 

Miss E. W. Park, $2,700 — $33 2.667 00 

Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Miss K. E. Bennett, $2,500 — $30 2.470 00 

Miss J. S. Roberts, $2,200 — $25.50 2.174 50 

Miss G. R. F. Rose, $2,050 — $23.25 2.026 75 

Miss H. R. Coatsworth (part time) 1.000 00 

Assistants (Sessional) : 

xMiss D. E. Mulholland 900 00 

Miss F. E. Lamon 800 00 

Miss G. H. Donald, Research Assistant 1.000 00 

$20,253 58 
Charged to Massey Treble Bequest 2,977 50 

(b) Food Chemistry: 

Dr. C. C. Benson, Professor, also Secretary to Faculty (with rooms. 

heat and light valued @ $280) $4,200 — $61.50 $4,138 50 

Miss J. R. Panton. Lecturer (Sessional) $2,150 — $24.75 2.125 25 

Miss E. I. Walker. Instructor (Sessional) $1,550 — $16.88 1,533 12 

Assistants (Sessional) : 

Miss E. J. Reed 1.000 00 

Miss D. Chapman 850 00 

Miss Marion A. Wharton (resigned 30 Apr.) 700 00 

Miss F. I. Honey (part time — paid also $594 as Clerical 
Assistant t $500 "— $5.25 494 75 



102. Household Science Department 

Laboratory supplies ($1,330.85) : 

Acme Farmers' Dairy, milk 

Borden Co., milk powder 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. chemicals 

(Canadian Laboratory Supplies, chemicals and filter paper 

T. Eaton Co., utensils, etc 

Eddy Match Co.. matches 

Lever Bros., soap 

Alex. Provan, provisions 

F. Simpson & Sons, meat 

Robt. Simpson Co., materials 

Accounts under $1() (4) 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendents Dept.. material 

Laboratory attendance ($1,507.00) : 

Miss A. Conacher. 43 weeks 

Mrs. E. Stroud. 42 w eeks 

Miss M. Martin, 11 weeks. 2 days 

Mrs. C. Brown, 13 weeks 

Mrs. I. Driscoll. 5 weeks 

Equipment and incidentals ($113.73) : 

Canadian General Electric Co.. icing unit service and repairs 

Toronto Hydro Electric System, irons 

Accounts under $10 (4) 

.Superintendent's Dept.. freight. $12.13; labour. $51.40; material 

$9.45 

Books and special equipment ($1,425.39) : 

T. Eaton Co.. waffle iron and rug 

Nutrition Abstract & Review, subscription 

Alfred Suter, testing apparatus and autographic recorder 

Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology, subscription 



7,276 08 



$10,841 62 


$28,117 70 


$183 28 


12 74 


18 90 


204 44 


103 27 


12 20 


10 60 


624 45 


108 39 


10 06 


16 62 


18 38 


7 52 


688 00 


672 00 


57 00 


65 00 


25 00 


17 50 


11 40 


11 85 


72 98 


106 74 


10 44 


205 92 


11 16 



258 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



53 50 

43 48 

994 15 



$193 39 
1,425 39 


$4,376 97 
1,618 78 





University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (12 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $792.60; material, $201.55 

Less credits: Laboratory deposits 

Charged to Massey Treble Bequest 



103. Food Chf.m:stry Department 

Maintenance ($847.95) : 

Akotos Inc., sodium lamp $100 06 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., halopticon, etc 75 30 

Canadian Industries Ltd., acids 43 79 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware 139 18 

Central Scientific Co., glassware, etc 100 22 

T. Eaton Co., soap, towels, etc 41 83 

Leeds & Northrup Co., indicator 40 16 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, acids 26 87 

Merck & Co., chemicals 35 87 

Thos. Pocklington Co., overhauling and adjusting balances 23 25 

Arthur H. Thomas Co., supports, filters, etc 12 35 

University Press, printing and stationery 12 60 

Accounts under $10 (9 » 32 33 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Stationery, utensils, etc., $28.41; food supplies, $21.59 50 00 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $9.08; labour, $75.80; material, 

$29.26 114 14 

Laboratory attendance ($1,097.50) : 

Mrs. I. Scott, 42 weeks, 2 days 700 00 

Mrs. R. Berry, 39 weeks, 4 days 397 50 

11,945 45 

Less credits from laboratory deposits 188 02 



104. General Expenses 

Stationery, printing, office supplies and incidentals ($219.16) : 

T. Eaton Co., typeAvriter 

Postage 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 ) 

Sundry disbursements by secretary 

Clerical assistance ($1,682.75) : 

Miss E. E. Cross, 10 mos., $1,100 — $11.25 

Miss F. I. Honey, 12 mos. (paid also in Food Chemistry) 

105. Household Science Bu lding 

Heat and liglit 

Gas, $229.70; water, $361.84 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Cleaning ($1..5.58.32 ) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 

Repairs and renewals ($1,159.29) : 

Accounts under $10 (6 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $654.19; material, $463.47 

Caretaker, A. J. Maycock, 12 mos. (with rooms, heat and light valued ((t 
$420) $1,100 — 111.25; (and overtime, $79.50) 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant... $2,564 81 
Credit for cleaning 10 85 



$41 


85 


32 00 


121 


43 


13 


88 


10 


00 


1,088 


75 


i 594 


00 


$2,564 81 


591 


54 


141 


06 


26 46 


1,531 


86 


41 


63 


1,117 


66 


1,088 


75 



7,103 77 



2.575 66 



2,7.58 19 



.757 43 



$1,901 91 



$4,528 11 
$39,063 34 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 259 

XI. FACULTY OF FORESTRY 

106. Salaries 
Professors : 

C. D. Howe, Dean of the Faculty. S6.000 — $102.50 S5.897 50 

J. H. White, S4.700 — $71.50 4.628 50 

Associate Professors: 

T. W. Dwight. $4,200 — $61.50 4.138 50 

Gordon G. Cosens (paid also $19 as Special Lecturer) $3,700 — 

$51.50 3.648 50 

R. C. Hosie, Assistant Professor, $2,900 — $36 2.864 00 

G. L. Assie, Instructor. French (Sessional — without salary; paid in 

Faculty of Arts t 

Special Lecturers: 

F. S. Newman 20 00 

Gordon G. Cosens ( see also above I 19 00 

Miss G. McAree, Secretary in Dean's Office, $1,130 — $11.63 1.118 37 

$22,334 37 



107. Maintenance of Department 

Laboratory supplies and apparatus ($279.22) : 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co.. lenses and reflector :?26 5T 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. binoculars 38 50 

National Defence Dept.. prints 26 76 

Photographic Service, prints 36 83 

Rippon Art, frames 17 15 

University Press, printing and stationery 25 74 

Accounts under $10 ( 12 ) '. 25 33 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Stationery and subscriptions. $15.94; sundries. $19.70 35 61 

Superintendents Dept.. freight. $10.73: labour. $32.74; material. 

$3.29 46 76 

Office supplies, printing. Calendar, postage and incidentals ^$382.87) : 

N. S. Houghton, filing section and cases 67 10 

Postage 50 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 10 85 

University Press, printing and stationery 215 38 

Accounts under $10 (2) 12 03 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Telegrams, etc., $22.33; stationery and sundries. .$1.18 26 51 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 1 00 

Collecting material for class work: 

R. C. Hosie, travelling expenses 33 25 

Laboratory assistance: 

Hugh' Campbell, 40y2 weeks 324 00 

Practice Camp supplies, travel, etc. ($1,548.09 I : 
Disbursements through the Dean: 

Travelling and hotel expenses, $222.95; telephone. $6; sundries. 

$35.02 263 97 

Cooks, troughton & Sims, transit parts, etc 21 55 

C. H. Irwin, students' and instructors' board and use of canoes 1.101 10 

Keuffel & Esser Co., chart paper, borers, rules, etc 37 52 

Lufkin Rule Co., log rules 28 62 

Might Directories Ltd.. forms 11 04 

University Press, printing and stationery 14 04 

Accounts under $10 ( 10 ) 43 81 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $25.94; material. 50c 26 44 

$2,567 43 

Less received from students for board 695 60 

108. Forestry Bi "ld'ng 

Heat and light $808 11 

Gas. S8.88 : water. $13.05 21 93 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 58 21 

Cleaning ($318) : 

Advance Windfiw Cleaning Co 14 lO 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 6 00 

.Superintendent's Dept.. labour 297 30 



S1.871 83 



260 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Repairs and renewals ($186.78) : 

Wra. Bartlett & Sons, roller and bracket 1 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $138.57; material, $47.21 185 78 

Caretaker, E. G. Payne, 12 mos., $1.400 — $15; (and overtime, $176) ... 1,385 00 

$2,779 03 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 808 11 



XII. FACULTY OF MU.SIC 

109. Salaries 
Honoraria to Dean and Lecturers: 

Sir Ernest MacMillan. Dean 

H. A. Fricker 

Leo Smith 

Healey Willan 

J. Leland Richardson, Carillonneur 

Miss A. W. Patterson. Secretary to Faculty (paid also as President's 
Secretary ) $250 — $3.15 

110. Maintenance of Department 
Printing. Calendar, postage and incidentals: 

Heintznian & Co., piano rental 

llniversity Press, printing and stationery 



XIII. SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES 

111. Salaries 

G. S. Brett. Dean ( see also Philosophy ) $1,000 — $28.80 

Miss N. MacKenzie. Secretary. $2,000 — $22.50 

Miss D. R. Bond. Stenographer 

112. Maintenance OF Department 

Stationery and office supplies ($416.48) : 

Postage 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (5) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1.07; material, .03c 

Clerical assistance: 

Miss Estelle Ridge. Secretariat, Board of Examiners for Professional 
Degrees. $50; postage. $1.04 



XIV. SCHOOL OF NURSING 
113. Salaries 

Miss E. K. Russell, Director, $4,000 — $57.50 

Miss F. H. M. Emory. Assistant Director, $3,000 — $37.50 

Lecturers ( Sessional ) : 

Miss W. L. Chute, Science and Nursing, $2,200 — $25.50 

Miss D. M. Percv, Nursing. $2,100 — $24 

Miss M. B. Millman, Public Health Nursing. $2,000 — $22.50 

Miss N. D. Fidler, $2,000 — $22.50 

Miss E. M. Stuart. Nursing. $1,800 — $20 

Miss E. N. L. Mortimer. Secretary-Librarian, $1,800 — $20 

Miss M. E. Nickell. Dietitian and Housekeeper (with living valued ^ 
$400 — paid also $49.37 as Lecturer; resigned 30 June) $1,700 — 

$18.75 

Miss M. Jean Wilson, Residence Nurse, 7 mos. (paid also $180 as 

Lecturer) 

Miss M. G. Barnes. Clerical Assistant. $1,140 — $11.75 



$1,970 92 
$26,177 12 



; 


$250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
250 00 
500 00 

246 85 


$1,746 85 
$92 44 




$26 50 
65 94 










$1,839 29 



$971 20 

1,977 50 

950 00 



$3,898 70 



$77 00 

312 10 

26 28 

1 10 



51 04 



$467 52 



$4,366 22 



J3.942 50 
2.962 50 

2,174 50 
2.076 00 
1.977 50 
1,977 50 
1.780 00 
1,780 00 



1.681 25 

490 00 
1,128 25 



$21,970 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



261 



114. Special Teaching 
etc.. for practice-teaching purposes 



Critic Teachers in Citv Schools 
($632.50) : 

Board of Education 

Separate School Board 

University Departments and Special Lecturers ($4,081.82) : 

School of Hygiene 

Psychology 

Biology 

Anatomy 

Physiology 

Social Science 

Lecturers : 

Thorton Mustard, Science of Education ^ see also 

Mrs. Florence E. Woodcock, Massage, > University 

$65 — 65c ' Extension 

C. E. Phillips, Principles of Education (see also Ontario College 

of Education) $200 — $2 

E. Fidlar. Physiology (see also department) $350 — $3.50 

Medicine (see also department) : 

Beverley Hannah 

Trevor Owen 

J. H. Elliott 

Gordon Bates 

H. A. Dixon 

Surgery (see also department) : 

W. K. Welsh, $100 — $1 

D. E. Robertson 

W. S. Keith 

Alan Brown. Paediatrics ( see also department ) 

C. G. Stodgill. Mental Hygiene (see also Department of 

Psychiatry) 

H. B. Van Wyclc. Obstetrics (see also department) 

Oto-Laryngology (see also department) : 

Perrv Goldsmith 

P. E. Ireland 

C. E. Hill, Ophthalmology (see also department) 

W. E. Brown, Anaesthesia (see also Department of Thera- 
peutics ) 

J. T. Phair. School Hygiene (see also School of Hygiene) 

G. B. Shillington. Oral Hygiene (see also Dentistry) $40 — 40c 

Miss M. Jean Wilson. Nursing "i see also 

Miss M. E. Nickell. Dietetics. $50 — 63c ( above 

Miss M. Bell. Nutrition 

Miss E. Hickey 

Miss J. Knisely 

Harvev Agnew 

Miss E. deV. Clarke 

Miss Edna Moore 

Miss M. MacKay 

Miss A. G. Dove 

Laboratorv Assistant, G. Scattergood, Physiology (see also Medical 

Research. Best ) 

Hospitals and Public Health Organizations ($795) : 
Victorian Order of Nurses : 

Toronto 

Hamilton 

Miss Elizabeth Langman 

Miss M. E. Blackwood 

Canadian Red Cross -Society 

Neighbourhood Workers' Association 

St. Elizabeth Visiting Nurses' Association 

Toronto General Hospital 

Toronto Western Hospital 

115. .School Maintenance 

Office supplies, printing, postage and incidentals ($842.97) : 

Miss F. Bellsmith. clerical assistance 

D. Gestetner Ltd.. ink and stencils 

Grand & Toy. transfer cases, etc 

Postage 



$597 50 


35 00 


400 00 


350 00 


300 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 



400 00 
64 35 



198 00 


346 50 


190 00 


150 00 


40 00 


20 00 


20 00 


99 00 


10 00 


5 00 


160 00 


100 00 


100 00 


15 00 


5 00 


10 00 


10 00 


40 00 


39 60 


180 00 


49 37 


30 00 


20 00 


20 00 


15 00 


15 00 


15 00 


10 00 


5 00 



50 00 



355 00 


5 00 


180 00 


90 00 


45 00 


45 00 


35 00 


20 00 


20 00 


«5 509 ^-^ 


$19 .50 


.53 67 


23 25 


77 00 



262 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., typewriter 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (3 ) 

Sundry disbursements by Director: 

Stationery, $23.45; telegrams, etc., |>27.35; sundries, $13.85 
Class room equipment and supplies, library and advertising ($376.86) : 

"Canadian Nurse," advertising 

T. Eaton Co., chair, books and magazine 

J. F. Hartz Co., gloves, forceps and syringe 

MacLean Publishing Co., advertising 

Toronto Daily Star, advertising 

Accounts under $10 (30 ) 

Sundry disbursements by Director: 

Drugs, $15.04; pamphlets and sundries, $8.78 

Superintendent's Dept., material 

Graduation expenses, including School badges ($74.56) : 

Birks. Ellis. Ryrie Ltd., pins 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (6) 

Travelling and entertainment, extra-curricular activities and physical 
examination for domestic staff ($331.86) : 

Nerlick & Co., candles, decorations, etc 

Toronto Radio & Sports Ltd., archery equipme::t 

Artists' services and sundry lectures: 

Dr. F. J. Howard 

N. A. Mackenzie 

F. Sylvester 

Mrs. S. Creighton 

Miss M. Winspear 

Dr. J. G. Falconer, professional services 

Accounts under $10 (3 ) 

Miss E. K. Russell, travelling expenses and entertainment of visitors 



133 65 


452 29 


18 96 


64 65 


12 00 


130 53 


10 31 


64 80 


12 00 


105 60 


23 82 


17 80 


45 00 


10 26 


19 30 

1 


12 16 


28 60 


10 00 


10 00 


60 00 


20 00 


10 00 


55 00 


16 75 


i 109 35 


$1,626 25 



116. Residence Maintenance 

Residence Physician: 

Dr. J. G. Falconer $200 00 

Wages, food, laundry and miscellaneous ($11,719.01) : 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 4,216 12 

Acme Farmers' Dairy 14 60 

B. Amodeo & Son, fruit and vegetables 924 09 

Barker's Bread 14 40 

Bowes Co., butter, etc 373 93 

Canada Bread Co 333 15 

Canada Packers Ltd., meat, etc 522 68 

Club Coffee Co., tea 64 70 

Coles Ltd.. cakes, etc 10 66 

Donlands Dairy 670 48 

T. Eaton Co., kitchen utensils and provisions 134 01 

John J. Fee, eggs 226 95 

Fumigators Guaranteed Co., exterminating 23 00 

Glencoe Provisions, meat 31 08 

Grimsby Pickle Co 20 85 

C. Hansen's Laboratory, junket powder 18 90 

.Samuel Harris, meat 59 02 

Heintzman & Co., piano rental 60 75 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals and drugs 31 36 

Kelvinator of Canada, refrigerator repairs 23 50 

Langley's Ltd.. cleaning rugs 19 72 

Lines Ltd., poultry 44 98 

Loblaw Groceterias, provisions 1.102 53 

Maple Leaf Milling Co., flour 47 84 

Michie & Co., provisions 97 83 

R. H. Morris, papers 12 00 

Wm. Neilson, ice cream 85 49 

Pacific Mills, paper 21 06 

Parisian Laundry 488 74 

Parker Dye Works, cleaning curtains and cushions 57 65 

Russill Hardware Co.. hardware 11 31 

St. LawTence Fish Market, fish 107 41 

Robt. Simpson Co.. labels, dishes, etc ^1 '^^ 

Slichters Ltd., flowers 37 10 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 263 

M. J. Smith, vegetables 

Standard Brands Ltd., coffee 

Tip-Top Canners, fruit juice 

Wm. Unser, cakes 

Geo. Weston Ltd., biscuits 

Whyte Packing Co., lard, etc 

John Wickson, meat 

G. H. Wood & Co., paper dishes, drinking cups and napkins 

Accounts under $10 (24) 

Sundry refunds of fees: 

Miss L. Lamson 

Miss D. Pequegnat 

Sundry disbursements by Director: 

Hardware, $22.03; food, wages and drugs, $10.35; sundries, 

$14.43 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $28.65; material, $100.92 

Furnishings ($1,318.11): 

T. Eaton Co., linens, furniture, etc 

Heintzman & Co., piano 

Johnson Office Furniture Co.. desk and chairs 

A. Moody, baskets 

Premier Radio Co., radio 

Robt. Simpson Co., repairing chairs, cups and saucers, etc 

Toronto Hydro Electric System, rebuilding electric fan 

Sundry disbursements by Director 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $159.75; material, $92.44 

5,237 12 

117. Contingency Fund 
Internships: 

Miss M. Haslam $150 00 

Miss N. Yeo 150 00 

$300 00 



12 


98 


124 


35 


19 


80 


122 


88 


19 04 


34 


45 


912 


14 


109 


90 


110 


30 


112 


50 


35 


00 


46 


81 


129 


57 


774 


17 


180 


00 


38 


50 


3 


75 


19 


50 


22 


60 


17 


50 


9 90 


252 


19 



118. INL-VINTENANCE OF BuiLDING (No. 7 QuEEN's PaRk) 

Fuel ($1,223.90): 

Department of Public Works $1,200 00 

Evans Coal Co 23 90 

Water, $159.89; electric current, $491.27; gas. $272.85 924 01 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 225 00 

Repairs and renewals ( $1,424.22) : 

Art Window Shade Co., shades 13 55 

Fitzgerald-McAvoy Ltd., screens 37 24 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 56 00 

Shipway Iron & Wire Co 4 25 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $899.85; material, $413.33 1,313 18 

Sundries ($559.87): 

Bell Telephone Co 477 80 

Grounds: 

B. W. Miller & Co.. plants 35 97 

Accounts under $10 <2) 14 60 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 31 50 

Caretaker, T. Marriott, 12 mos.. $1,200 — $12.50; (and overtime, $19.25) 1,206 75 



$5,563 75 

$48.206 44 

Charged to Revenue. 1936-37 $ 5.000 00 

Charged to Rockefeller Fund $43,206 44 

«!48.206 44 



264 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

XV. SOCIAL SCIENCE 

119. Salaries 

E. J. Urwick, Acting Director, (without salarj^ — paid in Political 

Economy ) 

Miss A. C. McGregor, Assistant Director. $2,400 — $28.50 2.371 50 

A. E. Grauer. Associate Professor (paid also $60 for Extension Work) 

S4.000 — S57.50 3.942 50 

Miss B. Finlavson. Lecturer (Sessional I $2,400 — $28.50 2,371 50 

D. G. McCullagh. Instructor (Sessional I $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

Miss E. B. Bambridge. Secretary-Librarian. $1,350 — $14.38 1,335 62 

Special Lecturers (Sessional) : 

Miss K. G. Gorrie 150 00 

Miss F. Held 150 00 

R. E. Mills 150 00 

Miss Norah Lea (paid also $50 for Extension Work) 110 00 

G. B. Chisholm 100 00 

St. George's School for Child Study 100 00 

Miss Ethel Law 100 00 

Mrs. Helen Lawrence 45 00 

Miss M. Gould 30 00 

Miss M. Bell 50 00 

M. M. Cohen 15 00 

R. S. Hosking ( paid also in Dentistry) 15 00 

K. H. Rogers ( paid also in Psychology) 10 00 

Wilfred G. Scott '. 5 00 

$12,534 87 

Less paid bv School of Nursing 200 00 

$12,334 87 

120. Maintenance of Department 

Office supplies, printing. Calendar, postage and incidentals ($600.75) : 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend. typewTiter. $54: and inspection $9.10 

Travelling and field work expenses: 

Miss Barbara Finlayson 

D. G. McCullagh 

Accounts under $10 ( 7 ) 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Books. $19.01: stationery, etc., $18.97; telegrams, etc.. $1202. 
Clerical assistance: 

Miss C. Jackson. 2^4 weeks, 4 days 

Miss L. Kav. 22Vo days 

Library- ( $96.30 i : 

League of Nations Society in Canada, books 

University Press, printing and stationerv' 

Accounts under $10 (17) 



$83 00 
63 10 




11 85 
16 10 

27 97 
240 17 




50 00 




37 00 
71 56 




16 05 
19 35 
60 90 


$697 05 




$13,031 92 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



265 



XVIl. 121. EXAMINATIONS 



Abbot, Miss E. B 

Ainslie, D. S 

Alford, John 

Allcutt, E. A 

Anderson. F. H 

Anderson, P. G 

Andison. J. G 

Angus. R. W 

Ante. I. H 

Ardagh, E. G. R 

Armour, R. G 

Armstrong, H. G 

Arnold. R. K 

Arthur. E. R 

Ashley, C. A 

Assie, G. L 

Auld, F. C 

Bailev. D. L 

Baillie, W. H. T 

Baker, A. W 

Balthazard. Miss I. G 

Banks. E. A. H 

Banting. E. W 

Batt, H. E 

Beamish. F. E 

Beck. E. C 

Bell. J. W 

Bennett, H 

Benson, Dr. C. C 

Best, C. H 

Biggs. G. M 

Birk. L. A 

Birtch. G. W 

Black, E. C 

Blackwood. W. C.... 

Bladen. V. W 

Boeschenstein. H 

Bondv. Rev. L. J 

Book, M. H 

Boswell. M. C 

Bott. E. A 

Bowen, A. J 

Branion. H. D 

Brant, A 

Brauer. R 

Breckenridge, J. G. .. 

Brett, G. S 

Britnell, G. E 

Brooks. E. F 

Brown, Alan 

Brown. R. J 

Brown, W. G 

Brown, W. Hurst .... 

Bryant, L. R 

Bryce, G. P 

Buchanan, M. A 

Burden. H. J 

Burk. J. D 

Burnham. H 

Burt-Gerrans. J. T. . . . 

Burton, E. F 

Caesar, L 

Cameron. G. C 

Campbell, A. A 

Campbell, C. G 

Campbell. W. R 



Remuneration 


Presiding 






to Examiner 


Officer 


Attendance 


Totals 


2 .50 






2 50 


10 25 






10 25 


10 75 






10 75 


10 50 






10 50 


10 75 






10 75 


14 00 






14 00 


8 50 






8 50 


22 00 






22 00 


22 00 






22 00 


17 50 






17 50 


45 00 






45 00 


50 00 






50 00 


54 00 


27 00 




81 00 


5 25 


18 00 




23 25 


5 25 






5 25 




27 00 




27 00 


17 75 






17 75 


12 50 






12 50 


13 75 


72 00 




85 75 


11 .50 






11 50 


9 25 


30 00 




39 25 


6 75 


45 00 




51 75 


5 75 






5 75 


19 00 






19 00 


52 75 


3 00 




55 75 


5 25 






5 25 






7 50 


7 50 


5 50 






5 50 


2 50 






2 50 


11 50 






11 50 


45 00 






45 00 




45 00 




45 00 






6 00 


6 00 


6 75 






6 75 


18 75 






18 75 


9 00 






9 00 


21 25 


54 00 




75 25 


19 50 






19 50 


6 45 






6 45 


17 75 






17 75 


6 50 






6 50 






144 00 


144 00 


24 50 






24 .50 






3 00 


3 00 




21 00 




21 00 


5 50 






5 50 


11 00 






11 00 


5 00 






5 00 


45 00 






45 00 


39 75 






39 75 


10 75 


18 00 




28 75 






25 .50 


25 .50 


45 00 






45 00 


19 00 






19 00 






4 50 


4 50 


5 25 






5 25 


3 00 


15 00 




18 00 


10 50 






10 .50 


5 00 






5 00 


17 75 






17 75 


.32 75 






32 75 


10 00 






10 00 


31 00 






31 00 


45 00 






45 00 






7 50 


7 .50 


45 on 






45 00 



266 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Cano. J 

Carscadden. W. G 

Carswell, J. M 

Carswell, W. E 

Cartwright, G. S 

Gates, H. A 

Chant, S. N. F 

Chapman, Miss D 

Churcher, D. G 

Clark. A. R 

Clark. C. C 

Clark, G. F 

Clark, R. M 

Clarkson, F. A 

Clawson. W. H 

Coates, F 

Coatsworth, Miss H. R 

Cockburn, J. R 

Cole, Miss A. C 

Cole, C. E. C 

Conboy, F. J 

Cook, Miss A. L 

Corrigan, C. A 

Cosbie, W. G 

Cosens. G. G 

Cosgrave, G. P 

Couch, J. H 

Coventry, A. F 

Cowling, T 

Cox, M. A 

Craigie, E. H 

Crake. J. E. A 

Crawford, Estate of M. M.. 

Crawshaw, J 

Creighton, D. G 

Creighton, Mrs. Sallee 

Crerar, S. R 

Crossley, Miss K. M 

Crouch, S. S 

Crutcher, Miss A. M 

Dale, E. A 

Daniells. J. R 

Danis. J. T 

Dauphinee, J. A 

Davey, A 

Davis. H. J 

Detweiler, H. K 

Drummond. W. M 

Duff. T. A. J 

Dunbar, W. B 

Dwight. T. W 

Dyce, E. J 

Dyer, F. C 

Dymond, J. R 

Eaton, G. T 

Edgar. P 

Edwards. G. R 

Endicott. N. J 

English. B. R 

Evans, K. C 

Ewens. F. G 

Falconer, J. G.. 

Farquharson, R. F 

Farrar, C. B 

Ferguson, F. L 

Finkelman, .1 

Fisher, A. H 

Fisher, J 

Fletcher, A. A 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



6 25 
50 50 



5 25 
5 00 
2 50 

2 75 



48 00 



17 


75 


29 


25 


5 00 


5 25 


11 


00 


50 


75 


32 


25 


6 25 


31 


75 


34 00 


3 


75 


39 


50 


5 


00 


55 


50 


40 


25 



19 80 

21 50 
5 50 

15 25 

3 38 
3.6 75 
45 00 
57 95 

22 50 
10 25 
88 50 

20 25 
45 00 

5 00 

10 50 
2 63 
5 00 



19 


25 


24 00 


45 00 


82 


75 


48 


50 


6 


50 


11 


50 



45 00 



Presiding 
Officer 



24 00 

24 00 
36 00 



Attendance 



54 00 



39 00 



9 00 



27 00 



24 00 
18 00 



27 00 



21 00 



30 00 
28 50 

1 50 
6 00 



54 00 
9 00 

36 00 



27 00 
90 00 
27 00 



30 00 



28 50 

24 00 

28 50 
19 50 



9 00 

22 50 

12 00 
25 50 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



267 



Ford, H. E 

Ford, Dr. Norma 

Fowler, W. J. R 

Fraser, Dr. Frieda H.. . . 

Fraser, Miss J. A 

Fraser, T. A 

Fricker, H. A 

Fulmer, H. L 

Funnell. W. S 

Gaby, R. E 

Gallagher, E. G 

Gallic. W. E 

Galloway, S. H 

Gardiner, W. J 

George Ruggles 

Glazebrook, G. P. deT. . 

Glen, J. S 

Glover, J. S 

Goble, H. W 

Goggio, E 

Goldsmith, P. G 

Goodspeed, F. M 

Gordon, A. R 

Gordon. S. D 

Gould, S. H 

Graham, Duncan 

Graham, R. R 

Graham, T. C 

Grant, J. C. B 

Grant, R. R 

Grauer, A. E 

Griffith, B. A 

Grube. G. M. A 

Guess, G. A 

Gundy, H. P 

Gunvaldsen, K. M 

Haist. R. E 

Hallman, G. L 

Hally, G. H 

Halperin. W. L 

Ham, A. W 

Hamilton, D. E 

Hamilton, F. W 

Hare, F. A 

Hargreaves, Miss M. M 

Harkness, Miss F 

Harkness, W. J. K 

Harris. C. W 

Harris. R. I 

Hart, C. W. M 

Harwood-Jones, J 

Haultain. H. E. T 

Havelock. E. A 

Hay, G. E 

Havgarth. Miss F. M.. 

Heard, J. F 

Heebner, C. F 

Helwig. C. E 

Henderson, V. E 

Henderson. V. L 

Hepburn. J 

Hicks. R. K 

Hodgins. L. C. A 

Hogg, F. .S 

Holman, W. L 

Honey, Miss F. T 

Hosie, R. C. 

Houle. A. r 

Houperty, J. A 



Remuneration 


Presiding 






to Examiner 


Officer 


Attendance 


Totals 


2 50 






2 50 


11 00 






11 GO 


13 50 






13 50 


5 00 






5 00 




3 00 


3 00 


6 00 






31 50 


31 50 


49 03 






49 03 


9 75 






9 75 


11 75 






11 75 


45 00 






45 00 






6 00 


6 00 


10 50 






10 50 






7 50 


7 50 


11 00 






11 00 


22 25 


3 00 




25 25 


5 00 






5 00 






24 00 


24 00 


13 50 






13 50 




45 00 




45 00 


17 00 


30 00 




47 00 


50 00 






50 00 






30 00 


30 00 


5 50 






5 50 


45 00 






45 00 




12 00 




12 00 


5 00 






5 00 


52 25 






52 25 




12 00 




12 00 


18 25 






18 25 


7 00 






7 00 


5 00 






5 00 


5 50 


27 00 




32 50 




27 00 




27 00 


34 25 






34 25 






9 00 


9 00 


29 50 






29 50 




6 00 




6 00 






9 00 


9 00 




18 00 


6 00 


24 00 






27 00 


27 00 


2 90 






2 90 


10 25 






10 25 


7 25 






7 25 


8 50 






8 50 






28 50 


28 50 






24 00 


24 00 


2 63 






2 63 


45 00 






45 00 


77 50 






77 50 


6 50 


27 00 




33 50 






33 00 


33 00 


5 25 






5 25 




24 00 




24 00 






24 00 


24 00 






25 50 


25 50 


10 50 






10 50 


37 00 






37 00 






10 50 


10 50 


8 50 






8 50 






9 00 


9 00 


90 00 






90 00 


13 50 






13 50 


10 00 






10 00 


10 75 






10 75 


6 .50 






6 50 


2 75 






2 75 


5 50 


18 00 




23 50 






7 50 


7 .50 


2 50 






2 50 



268 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



Howe. C. D 

Howitt, J. E 

Holland. G. W 

Hunter. A 

Hurst. R. 

Hvland. H. H 

Ide. F. P 

Ireton. H. J. C 

Jackson, K. B 

Jackson. ^ . J 

Janes. R. M 

Jaques. L. B 

Jones, L. E 

Jones, T. H 

Keegan. R 

Kemp. H. R 

Kendall. E. W 

Kennedy. C. A 

Kennedy. W. P. M 

KenrJek. F. B 

Ketchum. J. D 

King. J. T 

Kingston. Rev. G. F 

Kirkwood. Mrs. M. M.... 

Kirkwood. W. A 

Klotz. Oskar 

Knox. R. G 

Kreutzer. J 

Krieger. Miss C. C 

Krueger. L. F 

Kurtz. J. V 

Lacey. A 

La Flamme, A. K 

Laidlaw. Mrs. A. T 

Laing. Miss J. C 

Lamon. Miss F. E 

Lancaster. W. D 

Lange. \ 

Laverty. A. M 

Lawson. S. C. D 

Lazier. NL J. C 

LeBel. Rev. E. C 

Lehmann. A. J. V 

Lewis. E. P 

Lewis. F. I 

Linell. E. A 

Lord. G. R 

Lorriman. F. R 

Loudon, J. D 

Loudon. T. R 

Lowe. Rev. John 

Lo^^Ty. W. H 

McAndrew. A 

McAndrew. W. J 

MacArthur. J. W 

Ma-Callum. H. R 

McConkev. O 

McCullogh. W. S 

McCurdv. W. J 

McCutcheon. C. W. V... 

McDonald. J. L 

MacDonald. Miss M. D. 

Macdonald. W. C 

MacFarlane. J. A 

McGahev. Rev. J 

McGilvTay, C. D 

McIl^^Taith. T. F 

Mcintosh. R. A 

Mcintosh. W. G 



5 50 
45 00 

8 00 
63 50 
13 00 
12 25 

22 25 

45 00 



6 


75 


8 


63 


5 


00 


6 50 


11 


75 


20 


75 


16 


75 


7 


50 


10 25 


5 


75 


30 00 


5 


75 


17 


00 


11 


75 


36 


75 


20 


75 


11 


75 


22 25 


6 25 



10 50 



10 


75 


16 00 


45 00 


8 


00 


10 


50 


74 00 


45 


00 


10 


50 


45 00 


8 50 


3 


13 


14 


50 


19 


12 


19 


38 


45 


00 


4 


75 


5 


75 


5 


00 


20 


25 


27 


00 


10 


50 


25 


25 


21 


25 



Presiding 
Officer 



6 00 



30 00 



45 00 



30 00 
24 00 

39 00 



21 00 

27 00 

12 00 

27 00 

6 00 

24 00 



18 00 
24 00 



12 00 



24 00 



Attendance 



27 00 
30 00 
12 00 

30 00 



9 00 

3 00 
9 00 



7 50 
1 .50 

27 00 

27 00 
15 00 



7 50 



Totals 



6 00 

5 50 
45 00 

8 00 
63 50 
13 00 
12 25 
30 00 
22 25 

9 00 
45 00 

3 00 
9 00 

6 75 
8 63 
5 00 

51 50 
11 75 
20 75 

16 75 

7 50 

10 25 
35 75 
30 00 
29 75 

17 00 

11 75 



75 


75 


20 


75 


11 


75 


7 


50 


43 25 


33 


25 


13 


50 


27 


00 


6 


00 


27 


00 


24 00 


27 


00 


15 


00 


28 


50 


24 00 


10 


75 


16 00 


45 00 


8 


00 


22 


50 


74 


00 


45 00 


10 


50 


24 00 


45 00 


7 


50 


8 


50 


3 


13 


14 50 


19 


12 


46 38 


30 00 


12 00 


45 00 


34 


75 


5 


75 


5 00 


20 25 


27 


00 


10 50 


25 25 


21 


25 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



269 



Mclntyre. J. H 

Mclntyre. Rev. V 

MacKay. L. A 

Mackenzie, A. J 

MacKenzie. N. A. M.. . 

.McLaughlin. R. R 

MacLean, A 

McLean, E. C 

McLean. R. G 

MacMillan. Sir Ernest. 

McPhedran. A. G 

McPhedran. J. H 

McPhedran. W. F 

McQuittv. L. L 

McRostie. G. P 

McTaggart. H. A 

Madill. H. H 

Mahbv. E. J 

Martin, W. H 

Meek, T. J 

Melson, J. W 

Miller, C. A 

Miller, H. C. H 

Miller. R. G 

Millman. P. M 

Mitchell. C. H 

Moffatt. R. C 

Montgomen,'. A. E. . . . 
Montgomery, R. J.... 

Moore, E. S 

Morrison. C. F 

Morrison. W. B 

Mowat, H. F 

Mueller. Miss V. E.... 

Murdoch, D. C 

Murphv. Miss A 

Murray. D. W. G 

Myers. C. R 

Needier. Miss M. €.. . 

Newcombe, J. A 

Norris. C. A 

Norwood. G 

0"Donnell. Rev. J.... 

0"Donnell. J. L 

OToole. Rev. W. B. . . 
Ozburn. R. H 

Panton, Miss J. R 

Parker. C. B 

Parker. J. H 

Parkes. Miss A. E. M. 

Parkinson. J. F 

Parr. Miss E. M 

Parsons, A. L 

Patterson. G. C 

Paul. E. W 

Pavey. J 

Peckham. J. W 

Phelan. Rev. G. B.... 

Piersol. W. H 

Porter, Miss M. E.. . . 

Potter. H. A 

Pottle. H. L 

Pounder. I. R 

Pratt. E. J 

Pratt. Miss V. L 

Preston. R. A 

Price. H. W 

Ouinlan, Miss F. M... 

Rae. C. A 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



45 
20 
11 
2 
17 
35 
39 
68 
45 
45 

17 



45 
22 
10 



16 



45 00 



11 75 
45 00 
68 75 


5 25 


2 50 
5 25 


3 38 

17 75 

2 63 

50 00 



13 50 



25 



5 

2 


25 
90 


13 


50 


27 
5 


50 

75 


7 25 

6 00 

45 00 



Presiding 
Officer 



39 00 



21 00 



30 00 



27 00 



27 00 
39 00 



27 00 



15 00 

36 00 
24 00 

54 00 



Attendance 



6 00 



13 50 



6 00 
30 00 
12 00 



7 50 
27 00 

7 50 
7 50 



25 50 


25 50 


16 50 
22 50 


27 00 


40 50 



270 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Raithby, G. E 

Rapson, W. H 

Reed, Miss E. J 

Reid. J. E 

Raid, Spence 

Rice, H. V 

Richardson, W. L. C 

Ricker. E. A 

Riddell, R. G 

Riley, C. W 

Risdon, F. E 

Robertson, D. E 

Robertson. H. G. . . . 

Robertson, S. R 

Robinson, D. A. F. . . 
Robinson, G. deB.. . 

Robinson, T. A 

Romans, R. G 

Ross, J. W 

Rous, C. C 

Rowe, T. L 

Ruhnke. G. N 

Ryerson, E. S 

Sagar, W. L 

Salter, Miss M. D. 

Santo, R. E 

Satterly, J 

Saunders, R. M 

Schofield, F. W 

Scott, P. L 

Scott. Wallace A.. . 
Scott, William A.. . 
Sharpe. Rev. W. C. . 

Shaw, J. E 

Shenston, N. S 

Shepherd, A. L 

Sheppard, N. E 

Shillington, G. B.. 

Shore, T. C 

Shutt. D. B 

Sifton, H. B 

Sissons. C. B 

Smallfield, H. A.... 

Smith, C. G 

Smith, E. A 

Smith, Leo 

Smith, V. G 

Snyder, E. S 

Spence, J. J 

Sproule, W. H 

Staples, W. E 

Steele, T. M 

Stevenson. O. J 

Stillwell. E. C 

Stone, R. E 

Tail. G. W. C 

Tait. M. D. C 

Tavlor, F. T 

Tavlor, N. B 

Tavlor, R 

Taylor, T. M. C... 
Thompson, H. A... 

Todd. R. C 

Tomlinson, A. H.. . 

Toomer. J. E 

Treadgold. W. M.. 
Underbill. F. H.... 

Unruh, H. C 

Urquhart, D 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



17 25 

2 62 

45 00 



19 


25 


8 


88 


45 


00 


15 


75 


11 


50 


50 00 


45 00 


5 25 


29 


75 


75 


87 


5 


50 


64 00 


32 


25 


63 


00 


45 


00 


68 


50 


12 


25 


10 


50 


45 00 



16 50 



7 


25 


37 


75 


12 


25 


7 


25 


17 


50 


5 


50 


61 


04 


24 00 


26 


75 


14 


50 


5 


25 


17 


00 


17 


25 


15 


50 


10 


50 


6 25 


5 


75 


5 


50 


2 


50 


6 


50 


5 


25 


17 


00 



Presiding 
Officer 



Attendance 



6 00 



27 00 
24 00 

24 00 



24 00 
24 00 



18 00 



27 00 

51 00 
30 00 



1 50 
7 50 

7 50 

42 00 

1 50 
6 00 



25 50 

7 50 



30 00 

27 00 

24 00 
24 00 



24 00 
12 00 



25 50 
7 50 

24 00 



25 50 
4 50 



Totals 



17 25 

1 50 

8 62 

7 50 

45 00 

27 00 

24 00 

7 50 
24 00 
19 25 

8 88 
45 00 

24 00 
42 00 
39 75 

11 50 
50 00 

1 50 
45 00 

5 25 

6 00 

29 75 
75 87 
18 00 

25 50 

7 50 
5 50 

64 00 
32 25 
63 00 
45 00 
68 50 

12 25 
10 50 
45 00 
27 00 

16 50 
51 00 

30 00 
7 25 

37 75 

12 25 

7 25 

17 50 

5 50 
61 04 
54 00 

26 75 

27 00 

14 50 
29 25 

24 00 
17 00 
17 25 

15 50 

25 50 
10 50 

7 50 

6 25 
5 75 

5 50 
2 50 

24 00 

6 50 

24 00 
17 25 
17 00 

25 50 
4 50 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



271 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



Urquhart. R. W. I 

Van Wvck. H. B 

Waddell, INIiss M. E. G 
Walker. Miss D. G.... 

Walker. Miss E. I 

Walker, E. M 

Walton, W. M 

Warner, W. P 

Warshaw, Leo 

Wasteneys, H 

Watson, M. B 

Watt, J. C 

Welsh. W. K 

Wev. J. C 

White. J. H 

Whiteside. W. H 

Willan. Healey 

Williams. C. H. M 

Williams. D. C 

Wilson, G. E 

Winnett. F. V 

Wiren, R. C 

Woodcock, A. H 

Woodcock. J. N 

Woodside, M. St. A... 

Wookey. H. W 

Wright. Miss J. G 

Wright, W. W 

Young, C. R 

Young, H. E 

Zimmer. A. R 



8 15 

66 25 

6 50 

2 50 

3 13 

65 95 

31 75 



5 75 1 


45 


00 


5 


25 


6 


50 


55 


65 


25 


75 


50 


00 


2 


63 


5 25 


13 


75 


8 


25 


50 


50 


5 


25 


45 


00 


21 


75 


16 


25 



Presiding 
Officer 



24 00 



9 00 



21 00 

27 00 



42 00 



36 00 



Attendance 



22 50 

15 00 
25 50 
25 50 

25 50 

24 00 
36 00 



27 00 



Totals 



8 15 
66 25 

30 50 

22 50 

2 50 

3 13 
15 00 
65 95 
25 50 

31 75 
25 50 

5 75 
45 00 
25 50 
14 25 

6 50 
55 65 
25 75 
24 00 
50 00 

23 63 

32 25 
36 00 
13 75 
50 25 
50 50 

5 25 
45 00 
21 75 

27 00 
52 25 



1.603 21 



2.544 00 $1,537 50 $10,684 71 



APPORTIONMENT 



Arts 

Medicine 

Applied Science 

Dentistry 

Household Science. . . 

Forestry 

Music 

School of Nursing. . . 

Social Science 

University Extension. 

Pedagogy , 

Matriculation 

Pharmacy 

Agriculture 

Veterinary Science. . 
Law 



Remuneration 
to Examiner 



$1,097 29 

3,095 45 

512 50 

508 75 

15 75 

28 25 

205 22 

5 00 

40 00 

26 25 
327 00 
538 75 
132 25 

70 75 



Presidinf 
Officer 



.248 00 

180 00 

534 00 

102 00 

12 00 

51 00 

54 00 

63 00 

36 00 

24 00 
12 00 
9 00 
180 00 
27 00 
12 00 



Attendance 



$967 50 

154 50 

256 50 

82 50 



19 50 
6 00 



1 50 
49 50 



Total 



$3,312 79 

3.429 95 

1.303 00 

693 25 

27 75 

79 25 

259 22 

87 50 

42 00 

40 00 

24 00 

39 75 

385 50 

718 75 

159 25 

82 75 



5.603 21 



.544 00 $1,537 50 $10,684 71 



Remimeration to examiners Cas detailed above) $6,603 21 

Presiding and attendance (as detailed above) 4,081 50 

Honoraria for special services as a Revising Committee: 

Prof. W. J. McAndrew. $100: Prof. H. Bennett, $100; Prof. J. N. Woodcock. 

$100; Rev. B. F. Sullivan. $100 400 00 

Examination supplies and sundries ($2,269.42) : 

Engrossing diplomas, etc.: S. Harrod. $287.25; G. B. Pritchard. $171 $458 25 

University Press, pseudonym books, etc 1,635 63 



272 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Accounts under $10 (5 ) 20 47 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $1.42; labour, $152.19; material. 

$1.46 155 07 

2.269 42 

Printing examination papers and class lists: 

University Press 5.940 77 

$19,294 90 
Le.es credit for sale of examination books, etc 256 45 

$19,038 45 



XVII. UNIVERSITY EXTENSION AND PUBLICITY 

122. Salaries 

W. J. Dunlop. Director. $5,250 — $83.75 $5,166 25 

B. W. Sharpe, Supervisor, Correspondence Courses and Evening Classes. 

$2,400 — $28.50 2,371 50 

Miss H. M. Latter. Secretary. 7 mos. ((f $1,850 per annum (ob. 29 Jan.) 

$1,079 17 — $12.04 1,067 13 

Assistants: 

Miss M. J. J. Finlav. $1,300 — $13.75 1,286 25 

Miss D. deF. Milner, $1,250 — $13.12 1,236 88 

Miss Grace Anderson. $1,150 — $11.88 1.138 12 

Mrs. H. G. Petersen. Clerk. $1,200 — $12.50 1,187 50 

Stenographers: 

Miss L. B. Alexander 1.000 00 

W. A. Munro 1,000 00 

Miss A. D. Wren 900 00 

R. P. Brown. Stenographer and Clerk 900 00 

Workers" Educational Association Assistant, Drummond Wren, (fT $2,500 

( paid from Special Fund) 



123. Extension and Publicity Departments 
(a) Extension: 

1. Summer Session in Arts ($11,752) : 

Teachers' Course: 

Instructors: 

J. G. Andison $420 00 

F. E. Beamish 420 00 

S. Beatty 490 00 

Miss I. M. Biss 210 00 

V. W. Bladen 210 00 

W. H. Clawson 420 00 

G. P. Cosgrave 420 00 

D. G. Creighton 210 00 

J. R. Daniells 560 00 

H. J. Davis 420 00 

V. deBeaumont 420 00 

N. J. Endicott 210 00 

R. D. C. Finch 420 00 

G. P. deT. Glazebrook 210 00 

R. K. Hicks 420 00 

G. E. Holt 420 00 

F. P. Ide 420 00 

J. D. Ketchum 420 00 

H. R. McCallum 420 00 

.1. F. Macdonald 420 00 

Rev. J. E. McGahey 420 00 

.1. R. MacGilli\Tav 210 00 

E. W. Mclnnis 210 00 

L. A. MacKay 420 00 

I. R. Pounder 420 00 

D. A. F. Robinson 490 00 



$17,253 63 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 273 

J. Satterly 

R. M. Saunders 

Class Assistants: 

E. C. Black 

C. F. Clark 

A. Owen 

J. J. Russell 

Reader. H. L. Pottle 

Attendance: 

W. Banton 

L. Hughes 

A. J. Wright 

Course in Journalism : 

Instructor. Vernon McKenzie 

Attendance. G. Town 

2. Teachers" Classes ($8,632,351 : 

Instructors : 

G. L. Assie 

K. S. Bernhardt 

A. E. Birney 

G. W. Brown 

D. G. Creighton 

Mrs. Sallee Creighton 

E. A. Dale 

B. R. English 

F. A. Hare 

V. Lange 

W. Line : 

W. J. McCurdy 

D. J. McDougall 

J. R. MacGilli%Tay 

E. W. Mclnnis 

P. M. Millman 

.1. F. Parkinson 

E. J. Pratt 

G. deB. Robinson 

R. M. Saunders (including expenses. $170.18) 

Griffith Taylor 

T. M. C. Taylor 

F. H. Underhill 

W. J. Waines 

F. H. Walter 

Readers : 

D. G. Creighton 

Mrs. H. B. Hedman 

R. M. Saunders 

Class Assistants: 

A. H. Clark 

Miss V. E. Foster 

C. N. Haldenbv 

P. G. Newell 

Miss A. Nicholls 

Miss F. S. Patterson 

N. W. Radforth 

S. A. Simmons 

Miss E. K. M. Sims 

Attendance: 

T. Buchanan 

F. E. Harvev 

W. Kouwenhoven 

.1. McCormack 

E. J. Payne 

Mrs. R. Rogers 

G. Town 

A. J. Wright 

3. Correspondence Courses ($6,106): 

Instructors: 

Teachers" Course: 

J. G. Andison HO 00 

Miss I. G. Balthazard 324 00 



.560 00 


210 00 


120 00 


200 00 


20 00 


150 00 


200 00 


20 00 


72 00 


5 00 


420 00 


45 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


150 00 


150 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


150 00 


300 00 


150 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


300 00 


620 18 


300 00 


300 00 


150 00 


300 00 


300 00 


100 00 


200 00 


100 00 


80 00 


100 00 


50 00 


50 00 


80 00 


100 00 


50 00 


50 on 


80 00 


112 50 


6 50 


4 50 


47 25 


166 6" 


2 50 


127 75 


54 50 



274 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

K. S. Bernhardt 

G. W. Brown 

Miss A. C. Cole 

G. P. Cosgrave 

D. G. Creighton 

J. R. Daniells 

N. J. Endicott 

R. Flenley 

G. P. deT. Glazebrook 

F. S. Hogg 

H. L. Humphreys 

A. Lacev 

W. J. McCurdv 

D. J. McDougall 

Rev. J. E. McGahey 

J. R. MacGilhrav 

E. W. Mc Mclnnis 

L. A. MacKay 

J. F. Parkinson 

J. G. Perold 

I. R. Pounder 

Mrs. J. Robertson 

R. M. Saunders 

Miss F. A. Smith 

M. D. C. Tait 

T. M. C. Taylor 

F. H. Underbill 

W. J. Waines 

L pper School and Commercial : 

W. G. Baird 

L. S. Beattie 

W. G. Bennett 

W. J. Brown 

A. G. Croal 

H. A. Grainer 

H. G. Harvev 

W. J. Lougiieed 

J. H. Mills 

N. L. Murch 

T. W. Gates 

Miss E. M. Rutledge 

4. Evening Classes r 813,427.39 1 : 
Toronto: 

Instructors: 

E. A. Allcut 420 00 

G. L. Assie 200 00 

W. Benton 20 00 

J. W. Bateman 10 00 

H. Boeschenstein 300 00 

Mrs. E. A. Bott 200 00 

W. A. Brant 10 00 

R. A. Bryce 10 00 

H. R. Byrd 10 00 

J. Cano 200 00 

E. W. Carpenter 200 00 

H. Chamberlain 10 00 

S. N. F. Chant 200 00 

Mrs. K. H. Coburn 200 00 

^liss A. Cochrane 200 00 

L. H. Cragg 200 00 

Mrs. Sallee Creighton 400 00 

J. Davis 10 00 

St. E. deChamp 200 00 

.T. AT. Elson 850 00 

J. Finkelman 200 00 

R. Flenley 100 00 

J. M. Forster 200 00 

W. G. Frisbv 200 00 

G. P. deT. Glazebrook 100 00 

J. S. Glen 200 00 

E. Goggio 200 00 



507 00 


154 00 


212 00 


138 00 


102 00 


158 00 


104 00 


98 00 


154 00 


212 00 


126 00 


10 00 


68 00 


194 00 


50 00 


296 00 


194 00 


52 00 


25 00 


106 00 


40 00 


115 00 


134 00 


254 00 


126 00 


168 00 


144 00 


76 00 


93 00 


129 00 


178 00 


208 00 


40 00 


132 00 


162 00 


126 00 


38 00 


152 00 


192 00 


205 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 275 

E. Gordon 49 00 

Mrs. M. C. Graham 25 00 

R. R. Grant 400 00 

W. Green 130 00 

N. L. Griffin 10 00 

L. Harris 200 00 

J. F. Heard 200 00 

O. 0. Hines 10 00 

R. S. Hosking 200 00 

M. E. Hurst 130 00 

E. Johnson 200 00 

F. H. Kirkpatrick 200 00 

C. La Ferle 10 00 

V. Lange 200 00 

Miss I. Loudon 200 00 

J. S. Luckett 10 00 

R. N. McCormick 10 00 

Miss M. D. MacDonald 200 00 

E. W. Mclnnis 200 00 

J. C. Mclnnes 600 00 

W. A. McKague 10 00 

A. MacLean 300 00 

G. A. McMullen 200 00 

Miss K. McMurrich 200 00 

V. B. Meen 160 00 

W. B. Morrison 10 00 

J. Morrow 10 00 

J. A. Newcombe 360 00 

A. L. Parsons 200 00 

Miss V. Peene 200 00 

W. E. Perron 200 00 

A. L. Richardson 200 00 

J. H. Rickaby 10 00 

St. George's School 400 00 

E. G. Scott 10 00 

R. M. Sedgewick 10 00 

J. ^L Shaw 10 00 

A. A. Shuyler 200 00 

D. Snveg 200 00 

E. E. Sparrow 10 00 

A. .Stark 200 00 

J. A. Tavlor 10 00 

J. E. Thomson 300 00 

Toronto Conservatory of Music 39.5 00 

A. B. Ward '. 200 00 

D. C. Williams 200 00 

R. M. Winter 200 00 

C. Zusi 10 00 

Attendance: 

A. Bain 2 50 

R. Brown 52 25 

A. Clarke 159 50 

C. Crowther 5 00 

J. Harding 94 25 

H. Hill 127 00 

W. Kouwenhoven 1 95 

J. McCormack 3 25 

A. J. Maycock 23 25 

Mrs. R. Milne 6 00 

E. G. Pavne 5 33 

F. Stark.' 3 00 

A. J. Wright 6 .50 

Mrs. A. Yates 7 .50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 281 11 

5. Workers' Educational Association and Farmers' Clas.ses ($7,996,151 : 
Instructors: 
Toronto: 

Art Gallery of Toronto 200 00 

S. N. F. Chant 200 00 

S. D. Clark 50 00 

V. F. Coe 90 00 



276 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

G. P. Cosgrave 

W. M. Druramond 

W. G. Frisby 

C. W. M. Hart 

H. R. Kemp 

G. A. McMiillen 

L. T. Morgan 

T. Mustard 

J. G. Perold 

J. D. Robins 

M. D. Salter 

L. Warshaw 

E. T. Waters 

M. Winspear 

R. M. Winter 

H. D. Woods 

Beaverton : 

R. L. Vincent including expenses. $90 ) 

Brantford: 

F. Ferguson (including expenses, $22.10 ) 

H. L. Hutton 

Fergus: 

C. R. Philp (including expenses. $21 ) 

Gait: 

S. D. Clark (including expenses, $69.95 » 

Guelph: 

Miss E. Lang ( including expenses. $35.40 » 

L. Warshaw ( including expenses, $21 > 

Hamilton: 

S. D. Clark (including expenses, $52.05) 

J. S. Gemmell 

N. MacDonald 

K. H. Rogers ( including expenses, $41 ) 

A. Wingfield 

Innerkip: 

M. K. Inman ( including expenses, $3 ) 

Kingston: 

W. E. C. Harrison 

Kitchener: 

A. Wingfield < including expenses, $35 ) 

London: 

R. B. Liddy 

C. Si vertz 

Oshawa: 

H. D. Woods (including expenses. $24.80 » 

Peterborough : 

Gordon Price (including expenses, $119.30 1 

Preston : 

F. Ferguson 

St. Catharines: 

.S. Legge (including expenses. $41.65) 

Stratford : 

D. J. Wilson (including expenses, $49.50) 

Windsor: 

C. Sivertz (including expenses. $120.90 1 

Woodstock: 

D. J. Wilson (including expenses, $44.50) 

Attendance: 

R. Brown 

W. Kouwenhoven 

J. McCormack 

E. G. Payne 

6. Short Courses ($793.95) : 
Instructors: 
Nurses : 

G. C. Brink 30 00 

W. J. Dobbie 20 00 

Miss H. Frost 70 00 

A. E. Grauer 60 00 

R. L Harris 10 00 

Miss E. Hickey 5 00 



200 00 


110 00 


200 00 


200 00 


80 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


50 00 


200 00 


50 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


200 00 


60 00 


290 00 


222 10 


100 00 


221 00 


249 95 


175 40 


81 00 


252 05 


170 00 


200 00 


241 00 


200 00 


23 00 


200 00 


235 00 


200 00 


60 00 


184 80 


319 30 


200 00 


121 65 


249 50 


320 90 


244 50 


1 00 


68 80 


71 20 


4 00 



40 00 


70 00 


10 00 


5 00 


10 00 


20 00 


10 00 


18 50 


30 45 


5 00 


10 00 


20 00 


10 00 


20 00 


80 00 


20 00 


10 00 


50 00 


40 00 


40 00 


50 00 


10 00 


20 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 277 

J. D. Ketchum 

J. A. Long 

A. L. McNab 

Miss E. Moore 

J. T. Phair 

F. W. Routley 

N. S. Shenstone 

G. H. Stevenson (including expenses, $8.50) 

G. J. Wherrett (including expenses, $20.45 i 

Miss M. E. Wilkinson 

Public Administration: 

E. R. C. Bower 

A. Brady 

H. L. Brittain 

A. E. K. Bunnell 

F. R. Crocombe 

E. W. Cross 

E. A. Danby 

W. S. Ferguson 

J. Finkelman 

K. G. Gray 

H. E. Manning 

Wm. Morrison 

Judge H. S. Mott 

7. Course in Occupational Therapy ($3,076.63): 

Instructors : 

Miss H. P. LeVesconte. Instructor in Practical Subjects, 

8 mos 1.000 00 

R. G. Armour 40 00 

H. Ball 75 00 

N. Dean 10 00 

J. H. Elliott 30 00 

J. G. Falconer 50 00 

A. A. Fletcher 20 00 

Mrs. R. M. Franks 120 00 

Miss J. Hampson 100 00 

Miss N. Lea 100 00 

F. L Lewis 20 00 

J. L. McDonald 40 00 

K. G. McKenzie 20 00 

Miss O. Noble 300 00 

Ontario College of Art 300 00 

Miss I. Palen 10 00 

S. W. Perrv 300 00 

J. H. Rvan 100 00 

A. N. Scarrow 300 00 

E. T. Waters 75 00 

R. C. Blewett. book stands 10 65 

Copp, Clark Co., text books 1 60 

Doubledav, Doran & Co., book 2 07 

Toronto Type Foundry, card cutter 37 .50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $10.28; material. $4..53 14 81 

8. Course in Physiotherapy ($3,664.63): 

Instructors: 

W. J. Gardiner. Instructor in Therapeutics and use of 
Machines, and Supervisor of Course. 8 mos. ^paid 

also in Therapeutics) 500 00 

Mrs. F. Woodcock, Massage. 8 mos. (paid also in 

School of Nursing) $1,200 — $12.50 1.187 50 

Miss E. J. Ely. Remedial Gvmnastics, 8 mos 900 00 

H. D. Ball '. 75 00 

Miss E. H. Britton 1.50 00 

Mrs. Sallee Creighton 200 00 

W. K. F. Kendrick 200 00 

St. John's Ambulance Association 193 00 

E. T. Waters 75 00 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 7 03 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $109.31: material, $67.79.. 177 10 



278 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



9. Social Functions for Courses and Classes < $205.25 • 

Geo. Coles Ltd 

School of Nursing 

University Women's Club 

10. Books for loan to Extension students ($35.72) : 

Macmillan Co 

Accounts under $10 ( 8 ) 

11. Office expenses ($4,328.20): 

Stationery, printing, 
($3,214.20): 
D. Gestetner Ltd.. 



postage, supplies and incidentals. 



nk. paper and stencils 

Grand & Toy, cupboards, desk and book 

Photographic Service, prints and slides 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend, 3 rebuilt typewriters, $1.58; 

rental, inspection, etc., $108.70 

LTniversity Press, printing and stationery 

Sundry disbursements by Director: 

Carfare. $7; telegrams, etc., $15.11; sundries, $6.80 
Superintendent's Dept., labour, $19.24; material, $9.24 
Extra clerical assistance ($1,114) : 

Miss J. Brown, IOV2 weeks 

W. J. Dunlop. 49 weeks, 5 days 

R. Guilding, 9Vj weeks 

(a) Publicity: 

1. Advertising and announcements ($1,381.29): 

Canadian Association of Occupational Therapy 

Canadian Churchman 

Canadian Comment 

Canadian Legion of the British Empire League 

Canadian Public Health Association 

Dufferin School Old Boys' Association 

Educational Courier 

Educational Publishing Hcise 

Evening Telegram 

Forestry Chronicle 

Glebe Colleee Institute 

Globe and Mail 

I issrar College Institute . . . 

Mail and Emnire 

Missionary Monthly 

Normal School, Ottawa 

Ontario Bonspiel 

Ontario School Trustees and Ratepayers' Association 

Parkdale Collegiate Institute 

Sault Ste. Marie Collegiate Institute 

Scarboro Collegiate Institute 

Toronto Normal School 

Toronto Daily Hebrew Journal 

Toronto Dailv Star 

University of Toronto Monthly 

Welland High School 

Wilson Publishins Co 

Accounts under $10 (33) 

2. Issue of llniversity bulletins, exhibits and other forms of publicity 
($1,698.60): 

Alumni Federation, reprints and announcements 

Canadian Press Clipping Service 

Conn, Clark Co.. almanac 

J. Harding, overtime services 

Photographic Service, prints, slides and lante'^n service.... 

Postage 

Llniversity Press, printing and stationery 

3. Travelling exoenses of organizers and so'^pkers: 

W. J. Dunlop 



150 00 
36 25 
19 00 

11 33 
24 39 



957 71 

162 05 

28 10 

825 00 

266 70 
917 25 

28 91 
28 48 

165 34 

853 66 

95 00 



,018 27 

$40 00 

12 00 

30 00 

26 25 

46 68 

15 00 

14 00 

24 00 
185 25 

50 00 

15 00 
202 70 

15 00 

1.55 80 

15 00 

12 00 

25 00 
30 00 
10 00 
10 00 
12 00 
20 00 
12 00 

183 05 

22 .50 

10 00 

10 08 

177 98 



65 50 

60 00 

20 00 

2 50 

25 10 

870 00 

655 .50 

220 25 



Less credit from sale of bulletins, star maps, etc. 



$63,318 41 
601 05 



$62,717 36 
$79,970 99 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 279 

XVIII. MENS RESIDENCES 

124. Maintenance of BuiLOiNcs 

(a) University (North, East and South Houses) : 

Heat and light $3,294 06 

Water 169 63 

Caretaker's supplies : 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 363 40 

Cleaning and house service ($6,629.16) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry 461 01 

Baker Carpet Cleaning Co 7 10 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 6.161 05 

Repairs and renewals ( $3,776.87 ) : 

Art Window Shade Co., shades 18 55 

T. Eaton Co., settee and chairs, etc 203 95 

Federal Floor Finishing Co., re-surfacing floors 12 00 

Gordon, Mackay & Co., blankets 227 52 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., tiling 2 76 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 157 65 

Robt. Simpson Co., chairs and curtains 113 00 

John Smith, furniture repairs 20 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $2,169.30; material. $852.14 3,021 44 

Caretaker ($1,279.98) : 

G. W. L. Pratt, 3 mos. to 30 Sept.. $337.50 — $3.60 333 90 

H. Brown, 9 mos 946 08 

$15,513 10 
Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant $3,294 06 

Credit for repairs, etc 266 36 

3,560 42 

(b) Universitv College (No. 73 St. George Street) : 

Light . . .' $229 40 

Fuel: 

Central Coal Co 613 22 

Gas. $10.48; water, $77.23 87 71 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 73 78 

Cleaning and furnaceman < $2,088.55) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 113 61 

New Method Laundry Co 67 97 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour 1,906 97 

Repairs and renewals ($550.05) : 

Patterson & Heward, brass sign 35 10 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $401.72; material, $113.23 514 95 



$11,952 68 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant $229 40 

Credit for repairs 14 52 



$3,642 71 
243 92 



$3,398 79 
$15,351 47 



XIX. WOMEN'S RESIDENCES AND UNION 

125. Maintenance OF BuiLniNcs 
Whitney Hall: 

Heat and light $4,802 75 

Fuel ($125.84): 

Central Coal Co 115 79 

Evans Coal Co 10 05 

Gas. $348; water, $4«1.77 829 77 

Repairs and renewals ($1,940.68) : 

Wm. Bartlett & .Son. shades 14 70 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., tiling 11 46 

Kelvinator Ltd.. refrigerator service 12 48 

Perrin-Turner Ltd.. ice machine repairs 46 25 

N. Quesnel. incinerator and boiler repairs 18 45 

Vulcan Asphalt & Supply Co., tile repairs 41 81 

Accounts under $10 (6) 16 75 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,439.89; material. .$338.89 1,778 78 



280 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Furnace and boiler man : 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 368 07 

$8,067 11 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 4.802 75 

92 and 94 St. George Street : 

Fuel ($716.47) : 

Central Coal Co $695 78 

Evans Coal Co 17 85 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $2.34; material. 50c 2 84 

Gas, $36.72; electric current, $106.92; water. $48.53 192 17 

Repairs and renewals ($1,026.51 • : 

Art Window Shade Co.. repairs 25 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $790.22; material, $236.04 1,026 26 

Furnace and boiler man: 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 115 80 

49 St. George Street: 

Fuel ($410,081: 

Central Coal Co $394 24 

Evans Coal Co 11 98 

.Superintendent's Dept., labour, $2.36; material, $1.50 3 86 

Gas, $22.96; electric current, $141.35: water. $33.54 197 85 

Repairs and renewals : 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $234.68: material. $59.63 294 31 

Furnace and boiler man : 

Superintendent's Dept., labour 67 52 

University College Women's Union : 

Heat' and light $987 95 

Gas, $152.37; water, $67.94 220 31 

Repairs and renewals ($1.077.11 ) : 

Wm. Bartlett & Son. shades 2 23 

Vulcan Asphalt & Supply Co., repairs 62 76 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $784.67: material, $227.45 1.012 12 

Caretaker, Leo Cole. 12 mos.. $1,350 — $14..38; (and overtime. $2 t . . 1.335 62 

$3,620 99 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 987 95 



126. Housekeeping Account 

( a I Combined General Charges : 

Provisions ($23,412.15) : 

Acme Farmers' Dairy .$2,111 25 

B. Amodeo & Son, fruit and vegetables 3.752 76 

Arcadia Florist, flowers 82 .50 

H. J. Ash, fruit and vegetables 48 90 

James Bamf ord & Sons 57 40 

Barker's Bread 47 40 

Belle-Ewart Co.. ice 52 90 

Bi-a-cake Food Shop, cakes 16 20 

J. Blood, meat and provisions 26 23 

Bowes Ltd.. fruit and nuts 1.633 14 

Bredin's Bread 83 88 

Canada Bread Co 352 78 

Canada Dry Ginger Ale 104 ^8 

Canada Packers Ltd.. meat 3.474 66 

Central Wholesale Grocers, canned goods 78 61 

Christie, Brown & Co., biscuits 115 42 

City Dairy .543 70 

Geo. Coles Ltd., cake and biscuits 26 74 

Daily Brand Co., preserves 77 67 

.Tohn F. Fee. eggs 368 55 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, disbursements 10 13 

Mrs. A. B. Gauldie. preserves 18 72 

General Foods Ltd.. coffee and jelly powder 15 55 



$3,264 36 



2.050 95 



$969 76 



$2,633 04 
$8,918 11 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 193 



281 



Glencoe Provisions, hams 

Golden Glow Products Co.. eggs 

Grimsby Pickle Co., pickles 

Haeberlin Swiss Bakery, confectionery... 

Miss F. C. Hahn. honey 

G. C. Hardy, cheese 

Samuel Harris, meat 

H. J. Heinz & Co.. canned goods 

Harry Home Co.. nuts and provisions.... 

J. Hunnisett. Jr.. meat 

Hunt's Ltd., confectionery 

Ideal Bread Co 

Kraft Distributors Ltd.. cheese 

S. Lightfoot, fruit and vegetables 

Loblaw Groceterias, provisions 

James Lumbers Co.. tea and provisions. . . 

McCormick Mfg. Co.. biscuits 

D. Mclntyre Co.. fish 

Maclver Co.. meat 

McLaren Ltd.. olives 

M. P. Mallon, poultry 

National Grocers Ltd.. provisions 

Wm. Neilson Ltd.. ice cream 

Purity Bread 

Red Wing Orchards, apples and juice 

Robertson Bros., confectionery 

M. J. Smith, fruit and vegetables 

Watson Food Products, potato chips 

F. Wells, poultry 

George Weston Ltd.. biscuits 

George Weston Bread & Cake Co.. bread. 
Accounts under $10 ( 11 ) 



Cleaning and house service ( $7,689.22 ) : 

T. Eaton Co.. cleaning supplies, etc 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements... 
A. Guinness & Co.. wax paper, doilies, napkins, etc. 
Dr. H. Gibson Hall, medical examination of maids. 

Stewart-Le Grice Ltd.. candles 

J. T. B. Sweetman & Son. silver cleaning material . . 

Accounts under $10 ( 2 t 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 



Furnishings and sundry renewals ($924.08 I : 

Canadian Westinghouse Ltd.. washer 

Cassidy"s Ltd.. dishes and glassware 

Crescent Plating Co.. plating 

T. Eaton Co.. utensils, etc 

Hobart Mfg. Co.. mixer repairs 

Lionel Rawlinson. refinishing furniture 

Robt. Simpson Co.. linens, plating, etc 

Wrought Iron Range Co.. utensils 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $8.35: material. $L96 

Office supplies, infirmary service, etc. I $276.48 I : 

T. Eaton Co.. medical supplies, pencils, pads, etc 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co.. vitrolite 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, disbursements: 

Telegrams, etc.. $3.05; drugs, etc., $9.82; postage. $30... 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. lockers 

Miss M. Porter, clerical assistance. 30 hours 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (4l 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Staff salaries (additional to Dean of Women charged nnd 
University College General) : 

Dietitians (with living valued ffi $400 each) : 

Miss J. Barber, 12 mos.. $1,700- $18.75. .. . 

Miss V. R. Murphy, 10 mos 

Summer Assistant : 

Miss R. Hare, 5 weeks. 1 day 

Miss M. Storey. 3 mos.. 5 days 



$1,681 25 
1.000 00 

41 35 
158 35 



11 48 

15 60 

30 30 

42 66 

55 00 

84 11 

698 00 

127 27 

79 13 

185 56 

55 65 

576 76 

36 40 

19 50 

1.416 47 

345 65 

2.52 82 

282 24 

552 66 

12 59 

265 92 

3.646 47 

578 56 

182 25 

73 20 

12 59 

57 09 

71 75 

273 94 

99 00 

115 35 

56 21 



97 34 
12 62 
77 34 
22 50 
18 67 
10 00 
5 40 
7.445 35 



67 47 
420 32 
15 25 
29 02 
4S 15 
80 00 
213 48 
40 08 
10 31 



45 75 
22 54 

42 87 

31 24 

18 00 

101 08 

9 66 

5 34 



282 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Secretary-Hostess, Mrs. L. R. Howard, 12 mos. 

(with living valued fa §400 ) 1,000 00 

Nurse-Housekeeper. Mme. J. Ledoux. 12 mos. 

(with living valued fq $400 ) 1,000 00 

$4,880 95 
charged as follows: 

Combined General Charges $3,880 95 

Women's Union 400 00 

Whitney Hall 600 00 

3.880 95 



136,182 88 
Less credits : Napkin rings, etc 15 00 



(b) University College Women's Union: 

Cleaning and house service ($1,526.49) : 

Economy Rug Cleaning Co., rugs cleaned $21 60 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 25 08 

Langley's Ltd.. chairs and chesterfield cleaned 30 60 

Parisian Laundry Co 127 45 

Toronto Window Shade Cleaning Co 32 90 

Accounts under 810 (5 ) 15 92 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $102.59; material, $193.08 295 67 

Pay lists, wages, of maids, etc 977 27 

Furnishings and sundrv renewals (8341.49) : 

Jas. Barr, bed. . .'. .35 00 

Brown's Upholstery, slip covers, etc 60 40 

T. Eaton Co.. bed spread, fire guards, etc - 40 39 

Lionel Rawlinson, refinishing furniture 15 00 

Robt. Simpson Co., tapestry, linens, etc 110 12 

Thornton. .Smith Co.. recovering settee .50 50 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $18.15; material. $11.93 30 08 

Piano, magazines, etc. ($65.45) : 

T. Eaton Co., magazines, paper, envelopes, etc 34 45 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 4 .50 

Heintzman & Co.. tuning, etc 26 50 

Share of salaries detailed under Combined General Charges 400 00 



$2,333 43 

Less credit for extra services 50 00 

(c) Whitney Hall: 

Cleaning and house service ($8,297.87 ) : 

Advance Window Cleaning Co $61 75 

T. Eaton Co.. cleaning supplies 53 90 

Economy Rug Cleaning Co., rugs cleaned 112 21 

Miss Marion B. Ferguson, sundry disbursements 23 38 

John Garde & Co.. sewing machine repairs 11 10 

Langley's Ltd.. curtains and chesterfield cleaned .54 66 

Parisian Laundry Co 1,106 36 

Parker's Dye Works, drapes, chairs and chesterfield cleaned .... 83 25 

Singer Sewing Machine Co., needles and shuttles 3 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $464.08; material, $580.04 1.044 12 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 5,744 14 

Furnishings and sundry renewals ($1,138.34) : 

Brown's Upholstery, chairs and chesterfield recovered 244 65 

T. Eaton Co.. plating, linens, etc 123 11 

John Kay Co.. rug 25 00 

Lionel Rawlinson, refinishing and polishing furniture. .". 265 00 

Robt. Simpson Co.. material, linens, etc 302 39 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $17.48; material, $160.71 178 19 

Piano: 

Heintzman & Co., tuning 22 50 

Share of salaries detailed under Combined General Charges 600 00 

$10,0.58 71 

Less credit from students' damages, etc 285 35 



$36,167 88 



$2,283 43 



.773 36 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



283 



(d I 94 St. George Street: 

Cleaning and house service ($1,491.23) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry $142 49 

T. Eaton Co., cleaning supplies 15 32 

Economy Rug Cleaning Co., rugs cleaned 26 68 

Langleys Ltd., chair and chesterfield cleaned 17 85 

Toronto Window Cleaning Co 10 00 

Accounts under SIO ( 5 I 15 94 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $37.12; material, $134.96 172 08 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 1,090 87 

Furnishings and sundry renewals ($396.44) : 

Brown's Upholstery, slip covers, etc 52 20 

T. Eaton Co., linoleum, fire guards, towelling, etc 76 69 

Robt. Simpson Co.. beds, material, etc 170 83 

Accounts under $10 (3) 16 20 

Superintendent's Dept., material 80 52 

Piano: 

Heintzman & Co.. tuning 7 50 

Meals for Resident Head 144 00 

$2,039 17 

Less credit for extra services 25 00 

(e) 49 St. George Street : 

Cleaning and house service ($810.14) : 

Allen Mfg. Co.. laundry $60 00 

Langley's Ltd., drapes and chesterfield cleaned 37 17 

Accounts under $10 (4) 21 60 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, 32c; material, $26.08 26 40 

Pay lists, wages of maids, etc 664 97 

Furnishings and sundry renewals ($107.25) : 

T. Eaton Co., fire screens, etc 10 39 

Lyons Bedding & Upholstering Co., mattress 4 35 

Robt. Simpson Co.. material, etc 18 61 

Ward-Price Ltd.. rug 55 00 

Superintendent's Dept., material 18 90 

Piano: 

Heintzman & Co.. tuning 7 50 

$924 89 

Less credit for extra services 22 45 



XX. 127. CENTRAL POWER PLANT 
Fuel ($75,145.08) : 

British American Oil Co $100 00 

Canada Coal Co 14.469 85 

Cities Service Oil Co 120 00 

Great Lakes Coal Co 60,295 58 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Co 50 00 

Paramount Petroleum Co 100 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $8.25: material, $1.40 9 65 

Hydro-Electric current. $26.031.85 ; water. $572.54 26.604 39 

Repairs and renewals, engineers" supplies and miscellaneous items 
($13,378.28) : 

Babcock-Wilcox & Goldie-McCulloch, piston, rod, etc 469 34 

Beldam's Asbestos Packing Co.. gauge glasses, etc 59 18 

Canadian Charts & Supplies, charts 71 07 

Canadian Gasket Co.. gaskets 58 62 

Canadian General Electric Co.. piston head 192 85 

Canadian National Carbon Co.. batteries, etc 63 98 

Connaught Laboratories, charts 10 80 

Dearborn Chemical Co.. treatments 473 26 

D. G. C. Trap & Valve Co.. bushings 24 99 

Dominion Carbon Brush Co.. brushes 54 39 

Elliott & Co.. cutter 28 14 

Foster & Wheeler Ltd.. brick 661 78 

Garlock Packing Co.. packing 45 72 



^014 17 



$902 44 



$51,141 28 
$60,059 39 



284 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Grant Contracting Co., roof for coal bunker 1.294 00 

Hamilton Gear & Machine Co., gears 73 44 

Harkness & Hertzberg, engineers' services and repairs to boiler room 728 16 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Co., oil 415 ^6 

Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., valve repairs, etc 125 3.5 

Ramsay Contracting Co., concrete repairs 131 40 

Robinson Clay Products, bricks 46 92 

Schulte Koerting, furnace parts 191 45 

W. Sherwood & Sons, generator repairs, etc 10 00 

Smart Turner Machine Co., pump 54 80 

Wm. G. Stephenson, surfacing and grading 231 00 

G. F. Sterne & Sons, cement 66 91 

University Press, printing and stationery 17 73 

Accounts under ^10 (6) 39 72 

Advertising for coal tenders 37 80 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $106.15; labour, $5,836.10; material. 

^Iw57.5, 7.699 82 

Engineers, assistant engineers, firemen and trimmers ($19,887.42) : 

Chief Engineer, C. S. Moseley. 12 mos., $2,900 — $36 2.864 00 

Assistant engineers (ci $120 to $150 per month: 

L. McMaster, $1.800 — $20 1780 00 

W. Smith. $1,800 — $20 l"780 00 

A. McHugh, $1.680 — $18.50 i;661 .50 

S. Simpson. $1,560 — $17 1.543 00 

Firemen fg, $105 to $107 per month: 

Sundry persons 6.248 40 

Trimmers, boiler cleaners and pump attendants ''« $90 to $117.50 
per month: 

Sundrj' persons 4.OIO 52 



$135,015 17 
Less sale of cinders, etc 120 23 



$134,894 94 



XXI. MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL 
128. Central Stores 

Storekeeper, C. A. Johnston, 12 mos., $1,900 — $21.25 $1,878 75 

Assistant Storekeeper, S. Tipping, 12 mos., $1,100 — .$11.25 1088 75 

Clerk ($948.30) : 

Miss J. H. Bemrose, 5 mos., $500 — $5.20 (resigned) 494 80 

Miss M. R. Le Grow, 29^/2 weeks 'g $14 413 00 

Miss M. Pond, 3 weeks ^ $13.50 [[ 40 50 

Heat and light 294 89 

Less heat and light charged to Central Power Plant 294 89 

129. Grounds 

Foreman Gardener, R. R. Corbett, 12 mos., $1,800 — $20 $1,780 00 

Lighting account 33 j 38 

Labour, gravel, roadways, granolithic walks, flowers, shrubs and general 
expenses ($17,494.93) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 460 60 

Barrett Co., tarvia 35 qo 

British & American Motors Ltd.. truck. $1,124.84: less allowance on 

old truck, $140, $984.84; lubricant, etc., $8 992 84 

Builders' Supplies Ltd., stone, lime, etc 10 33 

Central Coal Co., fuel 2^ 10 

City Treasurer, water rates, repairs to water main, hydrant, man- 
holes, etc 292 60 

Colas Roads Ltd., road building compound 14 45 

Comrie Lumber Co., lumber 49 42 

Concrete Pipe Ltd., pipe 19 44 

Connaught Laboratories, feed 97 n 

East Hamilton Auto Body & Fender Repair Works, automobile 

repairs j- jq 

Grant Contracting Co.. catch basins and covers, repairs to walks, etc. 379 24 

Joe Hampson, sand 22 50 



$3,915 30 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 285 

F. Hogg, Nursery Co., plants 65 95 

Kinghorn Construction Co., roadway repairs 865 31 

McBain Foundry, grills 15 55 

B. W. Miller & Sons, plants 210 19 

P. Mulholland & Co., hay .33 95 

Geo. Oakley & Sons, sandstone 27 50 

Provincial Treasurer, truck license 65 00 

Ramsay Contracting Co., roadway repairs 343 63 

Hugh Reid, horse-shoeing 46 70 

Sheridan Nurseries, trees 21 5 

Wm. G. Stephenson, surfacing pathway 465 22 

W. P. Warner, sod 159 45 

York Nurseries, plants 13 00 

Accounts under $10 (5 ) 19 69 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $10,818.32; material, $1,910.99 12.729 31 



Less light charged to Central Power Plant $331 88 

Credit for cartage 129 58 



$19,606 81 
461 46 



130. Protective Service 

Pay of Constables and Nightwatchmen ($15,867.11) : 

Constables: 

R. D'Arcy. 12 mos.. $1,950 — $21.88 $1,928 12 

W. J. Scott, 12 mos.. $1,550 — $16.88 1,533 12 

H. V. Spence, 12 mos., $1,500 — $16.25 1,483 75 

C. Scruby, 9 mos. $945 — $9.94 ( see also below ) 935 06 

Nightwatchmen: 

J. Kirkwood. 12 mos.. $1,320 — $14 1.306 00 

A. Smith, n mos., 12 nights (paid also in Ontario College of 

Education » $1,259.36 — $14 1.245 36 

W. N. Lotto. 1114 mos., $1.207.50 — $12.70 1.194 80 

W. A. Evans. 11 mos.. 15 nights. $1,205.81 — $12.68 1.193 13 

W. Hunter, 12 mos.. $1,200 — $12..50 1.187 50 

J. C. Smith, 12 mos., $1,200 — $12.50 1.187 50 

W. Gordon. 9 mos.. (paid also in Ontario College of Education* 

$958.33 — $13.25 945 08 

A. R. Endersby. 36 weeks, 6 nights 774 00 

C. Scruby, 3 mos., $315 — $3.31 311 69 

P. McClory, 10 weeks. 3 nights 219 00 

D. Keddie. 10 weeks. 2 days 216 00 

W. Davis, 9 weeks, 6 nights 207 00 

Uniforms, clocks, dials, etc. < $426.61) : 

A. A. Allan & Co., uniforms 17 28 

Harding Bros., clock repairs 76 50 

Ontario Tailoring Co., uniforms 95 00 

Tip Top Tailors, trousers 19 35 

Tower Canadian Ltd., coat repairs 20 56 

University Press, printing and stationery 31 54 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $140.92: material. $24.46 165 38 

131. Telephones 

Bell Telephone Co., service to 30 June $12,209 00 

Less receipt*; from sub-services S3.330 82 

residences 731 00 

slot machines 156 23 

4.218 05 

$7,990 95 
Switchboard operators ($3,628.37 1 : 

Mrs. J. Hoddinott. 12 mos., $1,040 — $10..50 1.029 .50 

Miss E. M. Crawford. 12 mos 936 00 

Miss N. Rowberrv. 5 mos.. 29 davs 4.39 07 

Relief: 

Miss M. Maher 551 25 

Miss V. Covert 208 60 

Miss J. Brown 184 50 

Miss M. Burgess 126 00 



$19,145 35 



$16,293 72 



286 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Miss M. Houston 

Miss L. Reed 

Miss L. M. McDonald 

Miss I. Morrison 



Fire: 



99 00 


29 


55 


17 


40 


7 


50 



132. Insurance 

Major premiums, three year Schedule: 

Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co $1,280 13 

Royal Insurance Co 1,280 12 

General Accident, Fire & Life Assurance Corporation 1.227 87 

Home Insurance Co 1,097 25 

AEtna Insurance Co 966 63 

Atlas Assurance Co 966 63 

Continental Insurance Co 966 63 

Guardian Assurance Co 966 63 

London & Lancashire Insurance Co 966 63 

Norwich L'nion Fire Insurance Society 966 63 

Scottish L^nion & National Insurance Co 966 63 

Sun Insurance Office 966 63 

Alliance Assurance Co 966 62 

British America Assurance Co 966 62 

Hartford Fire Insurance Co 966 62 

London Assurance Corporation 966 62 

Northern Assurance Co 966 62 

Queen City Fire Insurance Co 966 62 

Western Assurance Co 966 62 

Dominion of Canada General Insurance Co 940 50 

Phoenix Assurance Company of London 940 50 

Quebec Fire Insurance Co 888 25 

Commercial Lnion Assurance Co 783 75 

Law Union & Rock Insurance Co 783 75 

Yorkshire Insurance Co , 783 75 

Essex & Suffolk Equitable Insurance Society 705 38 

Caledonian Insurance Co 705 37 

New York Underv^Titers' Insurance Co 705 37 

Employers" Liability Assurance Corporation 574 75 

Insurance Company of North America 574 75 

United British Insurance Co 574 75 

Royal Exchange Assurance Co 496 37 

British Crown Assurance Corporation 418 00 

British Traders" Insurance Co 418 00 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance Co 418 00 

Phoenix Insurance Company of Hartford 418 00 

Protector Underwriters' Agency 418 00 

Queen Insurance Company 418 00 

Scottish Canadian Assurance Corporation 418 00 

Union Assurance Society 418 00 

Dominion Fire Insurance Co 339 62 

British General Insurance Co 313 50 

British Northwestern Fire Insurance Co 313 50 

British Oak Insurance Co 313 50 

Legal & General Assurance Society 313 50 

Mercantile Insurance Co 313 50 

Ocean Accident & Guarantee Corporation 313 50 

Perth Mutual Fire Insurance Co 313 50 

Scottish Metropolitan Assurance Co 313 50 

British Canadian Insurance Co 261 25 

State Assurance Co 261 25 

Union Insurance Society of Canton 261 25 

British Empire Assurance Co 182 88 

Canadian Surety Co 182 88 

Globe Indemnity Company of Canada 182 88 

Prudential Insurance Company of London 182 88 

Southern Insurance Co 182 88 

Canadian General Insurance Co 182 87 

Imperial Guarantee & Accident Insurance Co 182 87 

Waterloo Mutual Fire Insurance Co 130 63 

London-Canada Insurance Co 130 62 

North British & Mercantile Insurance Co 5.128 75 



11.619 32 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 287 

Boiler Inspection & Insurance Co 3,076 25 

Commercial Union Assurance Co. (Connaught Laboratories!... 3.600 00 

S49,163 75 

One-third of above amount charged to Revenue, 1936-37 

( balance carried forward ) $16,387 91 

Casual premiums: 

Economics Building: 

Gore District Insurance Co 50 00 

Perth Mutual Fire Insurance Co 50 00 

Scottish I'nion & National Insurance Co 305 49 

Dunlap Observatory: 

North British & Mercantile Insurance Co.. . . ; 240 75 

Railway Passengers' Assurance Co 240 75 

Storage Sheds: 

Dominion Fire Insurance Co 367 50 

Railway Passengers' Assurance Co 367 50 

Stadium Grandstand and Bleachers: 

North British & Mercantile Insurance Co 825 00 

Hospital for Sick Children (University Equipment ) : 

London Guarantee & Accident Co 105 00 

Forestry Camp: 

Home Insurance Co 37 50 

Botanical Field Laboratory: 

Home Insurance Co 25 00 

Accounts under $25 (3 > 48 00 

Burglary and Hold-up: 

Dominion of Canada General Insurance Co 207 85 

Automobiles: 

Dominion of Canada General Insurance Co.. University-owned cars. 

8223.26: non-ownership coverage. $160 383 26 

Glass Breakage. Botanical Greenhouses: 

Casualty Company of Canada 50 00 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission: 

Permit and inspection fee 50 00 

Canadian Bank of Commerce: 

One year's charge for guarantee re safekeeping of securities 150 00 



$19,891 51 

Less rebates on cancelled policies 34 40 

133. Law Costs 

Hamilton Cassels. K.C.. taxed costs as Solicitor to the University $487 54 

Reeistrar of Deeds for Toronto, fee for land transfer tax re purchase of 

No. 53 St. George Street 36 00 



$19,857 11 



$523 54 



134. Auditor's Fees 
Clarkson, Gordon. Dil worth and Nash, annual remuneration $3,000 00 

135. Travelling Expenses 

President and Academic Staff ($1,901.70) : 

President H. J. Cody $95 50 

R. W. Angus 46 00 

E. G. R. Ardagh 40 00 

S. Beattv 15 00 

E. F. Burton 150 00 

C. A. Corrigan 25 00 

S. S. Crouch 34 00 

H. J. Davis 40 00 

F. C. Dyer 25 00 

Miss B. Finlayson 15 00 

R. J. Godfrey 34 00 

E. Goggio 40 00 

C. D. Howe 58 75 

H. J. C. Ireton 25 00 

Laurence Irving 40 00 

H. S. Jackson. 40 00 



288 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



K. B. Jackson 

W. S. McCullough 

J. F. Macdonald 

C. Martin 

A. D. A. Mason 

T. J. Meek 

C. H. Mitchell 

E. S. ^loore 

C. D. Rouillard 

E. S. Ryerson 

J. E. Shaw 

J. L. Svnge 

W. M. Treadgold 

M. W. Wallace 

W. S. Wilson 

A. S. P. Woodhouse 

Miss H. G. Woolnche 

Out-of-Town Members of the Senate ($592.60) : 

Judge J. S. Campbell , 

Judge D. J. Cowan 

Dr. J. H. Coyne 

W. J. Deadman 

H. C. Griffith 

J. H. Hardv 

Dr. C. D. McGilvray 

James McQueen 

H. M. Morrow 

Dr. T. M. Mulligan 

Col. W. N. Ponton 

Dr. J. B. Reynolds 

H. S. Robertson 

W. J. Salter 

L. F. Stephens 

A. R. Walker 

136. Receptions to Societies and University Visitors 
Expenses re sundry public lectures : 

Dr. R. F. Bacher 

Prof. F. Baldenspeiger 

Prof. E. S. Bastin 

Prof. Niels Bohr 

Lt.-Col. E. L. M. Burns 

Prof. E. Cohen 

Dr. E. V. Condon 

Dr. A. J. Dempster 

Dr. J. Franck 

Prof. J. C. B. Grant 

Prof, and Mrs. Hanford 

Prof. H. Henel 

Dr. Gerhard Herzberg 

Dr. J. H. Van Vleck 

Institute of International Education 

Prof. Leon Lemonnier 

Prof. D. H. McLaughlin 

Prof. H. M. March 

Prof. J. W. Meade 

National Council of Education 

Percival Price 

Dr. J. R. Roebuck 

Prof. D. Thompson 

Prof. M. S. Vallarta 

V. Van Gevseghem 

Prof. V. Vijayaraghaven 

Catering on sundry occasions: 

Hart House: President's teas and luncheons. $885.25; sundry guests 

S40.25 .^ 

Lniversity College Women's Union: President's dinner for Students' 

Administrative Council 

Wymilwood Women's Students' Union: reception to Social Science 

graduates 

Accounts under $10 (2) 



25 00 


272 50 


19 65 


40 00 


34 00 


69 95 


40 00 


57 40 


41 30 


154 10 


40 00 


210 00 


25 00 


56 45 


40 00 


22 80 


30 30 


136 35 


17 70 


11 40 


8 90 


10 00 


15 00 


32 35 


9 80 


10 20 


58 90 


15 00 


38 25 


54 30 


80 95 


45 50 


48 00 


f^ 101 3fl 


roRS 

.'$20 00 


50 00 


100 00 


200 00 


16 80 


50 00 


40 00 


40 00 


42 00 


247 59 


19 95 


21 50 


50 00 


50 00 


75 00 


20 00 


50 00 


46 68 


98 77 


75 00 


.50 00 


48 00 


150 00 


100 00 


25 00 


60 00 


925 50 


45 00 


'. 35 00 


8 00 


S2.759 79 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 289 

137. Convocation Expenses 

Hoods, gowns, printing programmes, invitations, etc.: 

E. Awde, engrossing , 

Harcoiirt's Ltd.. hoods and gowns 

Robt. Simpson Co.. gloves 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. S2.40; material, 31c 



138. Aid to Piblications and Soc eties 



Alumni Federation. University of Toronto Monthly.... 

Royal Astronomical Society 

Universities Bureau of the British Empire 

British School of Archaelogy. Jerusalem 

American School of Oriental Research. Jerusalem 

American School of Oriental Research. Bagdad 

Association of American Universities 

Conference of Canadian Universities 

Society Promotion of Engineering Education 

Students" Administrative Council (re student lodgings i 



$17 


05 


358 


50 


1 


80 


220 25 


2 


71 


$2,500 00 


150 00 


302 


76 


99 


13 


100 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


15 


17 


100 00 



139. Senate Elections 
Scrutineers: 

J. R. Cockburn 

I. R. Pounder 

Postage 

University of Toronto Monthly, advertising 

University Press, printing and stationery 



$10 00 


10 


00 


72 


00 


66 


00 


140 03 



140. BURSAR!ES 

Awards to sundry students: 

Faculty of Arts .S7.080 00 

Faculty of Medicine 2.475 00 

Faculty of Dentistry 1 28 00 

Department of Social Science 200 00 



Less portion charged to donations: 

Medical Societv !i?400 00 

Prof. E. J. Urwick 200 00 



$9,883 00 



600 00 



141. Contingencies 

Canadian Bank of Commerce, charge re registration of securities $20 00 

Chartered Trust & Executor Co., commission on collection of postponed 

fees of students 21 10 

Geo. Coles Ltd.. catering re Ontario Educational Association Convention 172 50 

Dunlop's Ltd.. flowers for funerals 97 00 

London Guarantee & Accident Co.. premium on fidelity bond 838 07 

R'^membrance Day Committee, wreath for Tower Memorial Service 12 00 

R'*it. Simpson Co.. decorations on coronation of His Majesty King 

George VI 127 00 

M'ss C. Wallace, compassionate allowance for illness alleged to have 
been caused by employment in Department of Pathology and Bac- 
teriology' '. ; 1.000 00 

Sundry payments: 

Engraving and freight charges, sundry medals 29 47 

Accounts under $10 (3 I ' 13 35 

Workmen's Compensation: 

Workmen's Compensation Board, to cover allowances paid to 

employees 449 34 

Medical services for iniured employees, etc.: 

Tor'-itn Gen'^ral Hospital 141 00 

Dr. Roy H. Thomas 93 00 

Sundry doctors ( 5 > 27 00 



$600 31 



$3,467 06 



$298 03 



$9,283 00 



$3,040 83 
196.298 16 



$119,653 00 



290 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

XXII. 142. CAPITAL ACCOUNT CHARGES 

Accountant. Supreme Court of Ontario, twenty-eighth annual 

payment on debenture issue of 1909 $25,260 00 

Less portion charged to Ontario College of Education. 10,000 00 

$15,260 00 

Accountant. Supreme Court of Ontario, twenty-second annual payment 

on debenture issue of 1915 re Hart House 5,975 00 

Accountant, Supreme Court of Ontario, thirteenth annual payment on 

debenture issue of 1924 re Forestry Building 10,000 00 

Toronto General Hospital, twenty-sixth annual payment on debenture 

issue of 1911 re grant to Toronto General Hospital 15,157 00 

Toronto General Hospital, twenty-sixth annual payment on debenture 

issue of 1911 re old Pathological Building 6,568 00 

University of Toronto (Rockefeller Endowment — Medicine) eighth an- 
nual payment on debenture issue of 1929 re Banting Institute 64,193 00 

Royal College of Dental Surgeons, interest on liability of $50,000 2,500 00 

XXIII. SPECIAL RESEARCH 

143. Departmental Appropriations 
(a) Arts: 
Biology: 

Research Assistants: 

A. Wilkes, 8 mos 

L. Butler, 1 1 mos 

W. H. Johnson. 8 mos 

G. C. Carl, 8 mos 

J. M. Speirs. 8 mos. ( paid also $50 in department ) 

P. Elson, 8 mos. 'paid also $250 in department) 

F. A. Urquhart (paid also in Royal Ontario Museum) 

Miss Alice M. Ironsides 

Assistant in Vivarium, D. G. LeRay, 12 mos., Tt $520, of which 

$250 charged to department 

Expenses ($762.65) : 

American Instrument Co., regulators 

Canadian General Electric Co., contactors 

Central Bird Store, seed 

Central Scientific Co., counters, glassware, etc 

Dr. Norma Ford, travelling expenses 

Halliday Flint Glass Co., glassware 

R. B. Jackson Memorial Laboratory, specimens 

Journal of Parasitology, reprints 

Kelley Feed & Seed Co., feed 

Mrs. E. Kuitunen-Ekbaum, travelling expenses 

Dr. J. W. MacArthur, experimental records 

Maple Leaf Milling Co., flour and feed 

R. Parks, aquarium cement 

A. Passafiume. feed 

Arthur H. Thomas Co., kymograph paper 

Wholesale Radio Ltd., condenser, etc 

I'niversity Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 25 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Food supplies, $12.98; hardware, etc., $28.78; sundries, 
$33.24 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $63.34; material. $25.85 

Fisheries Research : 

Research Assistants: 

F. E. J. Fry. 12 mos., $1,500 — $16.25 $1,483 75 

R. R. Langford, 3 mos. (paid also $883.75 in depart- 
ment) 600 00 

W. A. Kennedy. 3 mos 165 00 

Expenses ($1,728.88): 

W. J. K. Hardness, disbursements: 

Provisions. $319.05: travelling and hotel expenses, 
S;310.89: car and boat service. $229.59; s;as and 
oil, $222.90; hardware and lumber, $193.76; 
rent of cottage, $10.5.18; sundries. $63.39 1.444 76 



$600 00 


570 00 


450 00 


350 00 


300 00 


200 00 


200 00 


100 00 


270 00 


84 38 


41 44 


12 10 


31 30 


10 10 


12 23 


23 01 


15 17 


16 00 


35 00 


20 00 


35 09 


12 50 


14 00 


12 10 


71 23 


38 OP. 


114 73 


75 00 


89 19 


$3,802 65 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



291 



paid 
also in 
department 



Borden Co., milk powder 

T. Eaton Co., provisions 

National Motors Ltd., car repairs 

Postage 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (8) 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $4.62; labour, $9.04; 
material. $13.56 

Botany : 

Research Associate. L. C. Coleman. 12 mos 

Honorary Research Associate, J. Dearness (without salary) 

Research Assistants : 

D. H. Hamly, 12 mos. (part time — paid also $519.50 in 
department and $346.40 in Applied Physics) $382 — $3.40 

A. J. V. Lehmann, 3 mos., $222 — $1.50. -, 

L. O. Weaver. 3 mos 

Miss R. P. Biggs, 3 mos 

D. C. McPherson, 3 mos 

Norman W. Radforth, 3 mos 

W. K. W. Baldwin, 3 mos 

C. N. Haldenby, 3 mos 

Miss Sylvia Taylor, 3 mos 

Mrs. Eleanor L. MacGillivray, 300 hrs. Cd 50c , 

R. G. H. Cormack, 2 mos 

F. E. Tomalin, 2 mos 

Miss A. B. Brodie. 2 mos.. . i 

A. N. Langford. 2 mos 

Miss D. F. Forward, 2 mos. paid 

D. F. Putnam, 1 month. ... 1- also in 
M. W. Bannan. 1 month. .. I department 
S. A. Simmons, 1 month. . . 

A. J. Skolko, 1 month J 

W. R. Watson, 1 month 

Miss E. Parr, 1 month.. | paid 

B. B. Hillary, 1 month. . |- also in 
S. T. B. Losee. 1 month I department 
Miss K. Shepherd, 101 hrs. @ 50c 

Expenses ($610.14) : 

Art Metropole, steroscope disc 

Canadian Liquid Air Co.. rental of cylinders and gas. 

Central Scientific Co.. chemicals and glassware 

R. G. H. Cormack, collecting expenses 

Julius P. Friez & Sons, charts 

J. F. Hartz Co., cover glasses 

L. E. Jones, photographic work 

P. Krotkov, collecting expenses 

Lancaster Press, reprints 

R. C. Russell, plant specimens 

Screen & Sound Service, objective 

Spencer Lens Co., microscope part 

Telfer Paper Box Co., seed boxes 

Prof, R. B. Thomson, collecting expenses 

Wilson Scientific Co.. glassware 

Accounts under $10 ( 20) 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $26.89; material, $2.88 



20 58 
57 46 
38 51 
16 20 
79 02 
45 13 

27 22 



$1,000 00 



378 60 
220 50 
180 00 
177 00 
177 00 
152 00 
150 00 
137 00 
132 00 
150 00 
120 00 
120 00 
117 00 
117 00 

92 00 
72 00 
57 00 
57 00 
57 00 
57 00 
42 00 
37 00 
30 00 
50 50 

20 00 
33 17 

28 52 
65 93 

14 02 
10 00 
18 54 
37 00 
37 63 

15 28 

22 00 
10 46 

130 00 

21 19 

23 28 

93 35 

29 77 



(b) Medicine: 

Bio-Chemistry: 

Research Assistants: 

B. F. Crocker, 2 mos. (paid also $1,780 in department) 

$200 — $2 $198 00 

V. Ignatieff, 1 month, $87.50 — 88c 86 62 

A. D. Odell, 1 month (paid also $800 in department ) 75 00 

M. Freed, 1 month 50 00 

L. Rabinowitch. 1 month 50 00 

G. C. Butler, 1 month (paid also $900 in department) 25 00 

S. Cohen, 1 month 25 00 

Experimental Medical Research: 

Chief Technical Assistant, W. Cowan. 12 mos., $1,700 — $18.75 $1,681 25 
Head of Animal Quarters, J. Minshull, 12 mos 600 00 



$7,780 28 



$4,489 74 



$509 62 



292 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Assistants in Animal Quarters: 

G. Parkes, 12 mos 720 00 

Cyril Lee. 12 mos 660 00 

Expenses ($2,495.86) : 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 116 67 

Fred Broom, feed ] 2 44 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 34 34 

E. Cullen. animals 614 50 

R. Cullen, animals 29 50 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, gauze, etc 559 09 

Jones Bros., electric clipper and plates 52 62 

Kelley Feed & Seed Co., feed 107 83 

Kelvinator of Canada Ltd., refrigerator repairs 14 35 

Langley. Harris Co., dog biscuits 100 00 

John McGillian, carrots 51 75 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, ether 23 26 

Maple Leaf Milling Co., feed 145 14 

Ralston. Purina Co.. feed 321 34 

Swift Canadian Co., feed 17 50 

Window Shades and Fittings, Venetian blinds 26 70 

Accounts under $10 (2) 9 85 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $76.87; material. $182.11.. 258 98 

$6,157 11 

Less credit from sale of animals and feed 542 50 

$5,614 61 

Charged to Dunlap Bequest $5,176 25 

Charged to Reeve Bequest 438 36 

5.614 61 



-$4.50.^ 
k50.... 
$4.50.. 



Paid also in 
department 



(c) Applied Science: 

Chemical Engineering: 
Research Assistants: 

W. H. Bowman. 3 mos.. $450 
G. V. Jansen. 3 mos.. $450 — 
W. H. Rapson. 3 mos., $450 - 

G. P. Real, 2 mos / 

K. Patrick, 8 mos 

Applied Physics: 

Machinist, C. T. Harding, 8-18/44ths weeks (see also depart- 
ment) $252.27 — $2.52 

Expenses ($244) : 

Howard Furnace Co., blast cooler, caul unit 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $77.03; material. $47.97... 
Mechanical Engineering: 

Research Assistant, F. G. Ewens. 5 mos. (paid also $1,097.78 

in department ) 

Expenses ($403.71) : 

Central Scientific Co.. rheostat 

Minneapolis Honeywell Regulator Co., potentiometer 

Powerlite Devices Ltd., seconding thermometer, etc 

University Press, book 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $6.31: labour. $.50.34; 

material. $50.43 

Mining Engineering: 

Research Assistants: 

T. J. Brant, 4-2/5 mos. (paid also $507..50 in Mechanical 

Engineering ) 

L. F. Gauvreau, 1 month (paid also $1,000 in department I 
Expenses ($287.75) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, aspirator, etc 

Gorman Engineering Co.. angles 

United .Steel Corporation, chain bore, etc 

Accounts under $10 (8 ) 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $91.23; material, $29.17 



Charged to Wallberg Bequest. 



$445 50 
445 50 
445 50 
150 00 
545 00 



249 75 

119 00 
125 00 



862 50 

28 01 
139 65 

126 47 
2 50 

107 08 



550 00 


150 00 


24 23 


25 26 


60 21 


15 22 


42 43 


120 40 


$4,779 21 


4.779 21 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



292 



(d) 



Dentistry: 

Professor of Periodontology. H. K. Box. 12 mos, ( paid also $6 for 

Post Graduate Course ) $3,000 — $37.50 $2,962 50 

Laboratory Technician. A. F. Fenton (paid also $100 from Canadian 

Dental Research Fund I $1,300 — $13.75 1.286 25 



144. Bant. Nc AND Best Rese.\rch 
(a) Banting Research: 

Professor of Research in Medicine. Sir Frederick Banting. 12 mos... $5,000 00 

D. A. Irwin. Associate Professor, 12 mos.. $3,600 ~ $49.50 3.550 50 

Assistant Professors, each 12 mos.: 

W. R. Franks. $3,400 — $45.50 3.354 50 

G. E. Hall, $3,000 — $37.50 2,962 50 

C. C. Lucas ( on leave of absence ) $3,000 — $37.50 2,962 50 

Miss S. Gairns. Research Associate, 12 mos.. $2,160 — $24.90 2,135 10 

Research Assistants : 

Miss J. M. Lang, 12 mos.. $1,400 — $15 1.385 00 

G. W. Manning, 12 mos.. $1,200 — $12.50 1.187 .50 

Miss M. >L Shaw. 12 mos., $1,200 — $12.50 1,187 50 

Miss H. E. Williams. 12 mos 900 00 

H. R. Davidson, 12 mos 675 00 

J. E. Goodwin. 10 mos., $1,500 — $16.25 1.483 75 

B. C. Coles, 7 mos.. $875 — $9.17 865 83 

Miss E. M. Hearne. 10 mos 1.000 00 

D. P. Lloyd, 10 mos 1,000 00 

H. F. Richardson, 10 mos 1.000 00 

Miss Henrietta Ball. 10 mos 750 00 

H. L. Collins. 5 mos 700 00 

F. L. Lawson, 4 mos 305 00 

B. Seaton. 2 mos 150 00 

H. H. Bindon, 2 mos 125 00 

P. T. Greenberg, 2 mos 100 00 

K. C. Greer. 2 mos 100 00 

B. Leibel, 1 month 75 00 

F. B Thomson, 1 month 75 00 

M. L. Allan. 1 month 60 00 

Research Fellows: 

F. H. Lawford, 12 mos., $1,110 — $11.37 1,098 63 

H. J. Creech. 11 mos 990 00 

A. Duncan. 11 mos 825 00 

D. D. Bonnvcastle, 10 mos 1.000 00 

L. M. Gray, 10 mos 1.000 00 

W. M. Gray. 10 mos 750 00 

L. B. Macpherson, 10 mos 750 00 

J. K. Watson. 6 mos 450 00 

Lome D. Proctor. 4 mos 400 00 

J. J. Rae. 3 mos 300 00 

Technicians: 

L. C. Brock, 12 mos., $1,320 — $14 1.306 00 

H. Doudas. 12 mos.. $1,200 — $12..50 1.187 50 

T. Walker. 12 mos.. $1,140 — - $11.75 1.128 25 

J. Conlev. 12 mos., $1,080 — $11 ; overtime. $49 1.118 00 

Miss G. Mulholland. 12 mos 780 00 

Miss N. Davy. 12 mos 660 00 

Chas. Lott, 5 mos., $375 : overtime, $24.75 399 75 

Douglas Snow. 12V:; weeks di $12.50 156 25 

John Stewart. 6 weeks ^/ $12.50 75 00 

Fred Warner. 1 month. 1 week 59 68 

Stanley Stringer, 2 week.s, 4 days, '^f $12 32 00 

Secretarial Assistants: 

Miss M. J. Millar, 12 mos.. $1,080 — $11 1.069 00 

Miss E. D. Brnnke, 5 mos., 11 days. <o $.50 404 00 

Assistants in .Animal Quarters: 

A. W. Booth. 10 mos .550 00 

At $12..50 per week: 

.Stanley Smith. 12 weeks 150 00 

Frank Simpson. lOM; weeks 131 25 

A. Stella. 9V2 weeks 118 75 

Cleaner. Mrs. Allison Moffitt. 12 mos. (part timet 600 00 

$50,578 74 



$4,248 75 



294 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Expenses ($18,384,381: 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware $38 79 

Allen Mfg. Co., laundry 284 78 

American Journal of Cancer, subscription 10 41 

Art Metropole, board, etc 11 18 

Bausch & Lomb Optical Co., colorimeter repairs, etc 50 96 

Borden Co.. milk powder 18 86 

British Aluminium Co., granules 12 50 

Fred Broom, meat, etc 161 20 

Canada Cycle & Motor Co., wheels 24 04 

Canada Packers Ltd., food 10 80 

Canadian General Electric Co., bulbs, lamps, etc 24 38 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. acids 83 71 

Canadian Kodak Co.. chemicals 100 44 

Canadian Marconi Co., undulator 75 00 

Canadian Medical Association, reprints 39 00 

Carswell Co.. binding 36 34 

Walter A. Carveth & Co., microscope and case 236 00 

Central Scientific Co., chemicals, glassware, etc 1,064 48 

Chance Bros., glassware 34 29 

Connaught Laboratories, animals, etc 72 20 

Continental Carbon of Canada, resistance boxes 90 41 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., laboratory coats 134 21 

E. Cullen. animals 2,602 86 

R. Cullen. animals 60 90 

Culling Ltd., tape 12 69 

Diamond State Fibre Co.. fibre tubing 10 66 

Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories, cathode ray tube 31 72 

Eastman Photographic Stores, trays, fixing box and rolls 253 03 

T. Eaton Co., crocks, screen, tumblers, etc 29 55 

Electric Motors Service Co., motors 162 35 

Exide Batteries of Canada, battery 116 90 

Gevaert Co.. plates, chemicals, etc 32 24 

Grand & Toy. files, chair, hat tree and cabinet 88 15 

Geo. Green Welding Co., frames 23 52 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Ltd.. gasket stock, etc 244 52 

Paul Haack. thermometers, etc 44 06 

J. F. Hartz Co.. cover glasses and chemicals 14 70 

0. W. Hertzberg, chemicals 12 15 

A. S. Hunt, glassblowing. etc 12 50 

Ingram & Bell, chemicals, syringes, etc 467 14 

Instruments Ltd., aneometer 36 50 

International Resistance Co., resistors 27 71 

Johnson-Matthey Co.. crucibles, etc 145 79 

Journal of Biological Chemistry, books 14 06 

Richard Kittel. instrument needle carrier 209 26 

Leeds & Northrup Co.. galvanometer, telescope, etc 90 38 

L. Light & Co., chemicals .54 92 

Liquid Carbonic Corporation, gas 40 00 

Lockhart's Camera Exchange, plates 44 99 

W. R. McKee. heart sound amplifier, etc 310 85 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., ether and chemicals 81 80 

National Grocers Co., salmon 13 60 

Naylor & Naylor, speed reducing machine 52 50 

R. H. Nichols, pendulum with keys 314 25 

Northern Electric Co., condensers 39 31 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., cards, guides and folders 23 17 

Ontario College of Agriculture, eggs and chickens 205 20 

Ontario Veterinary College, mice 10 00 

Osborne Electric Co., attenuator 28 62 

C. F. Palmer Ltd., paper 14 92 

Pathology Dept.. animals 12 60 

Postage 40 12 

Ralston Purina Co.. feed 316 85 

Riddell Lumber Co., metal building for Silicosis experiments. . . 867 00 

Risbrough & Jackson, seeds 185 61 

M. Risebrough. animals 42 00 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 22 20 

Rogers Radio Tubes Ltd.. cathode 25 00 

Arthur H. Thomas Co.. paper recorders 55 36 

Toronto General Hospital, small mill 12 00 

Walden & Jennings, sawdust 10 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



295 



Waverley Press, reprints 

West Disinfecting Co., disinfectant 

S. S. White, cylinders 

Wholesale Radio Co.. radio parts 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under SIO ( 32 • 

Travelling expenses: 

Sir Frederick Banting 

G. E. Hall 

W. R. Franks 

D. A. Irwin 

D. P. C. Lloyd 

Sundry disbursements by department: 

Hardware, $43.78; drugs and stationery, $38.41; postage, 
telegrams, etc.. $29.93; food supplies. $11.98; sundries, 

$25.90 ^ . 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight, $101.22: labour, $2,736.1/; 

material. $3,202.72 

Contribution to Pension Funds 

Alterations to Banting Institute: 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $2,043.32; material. $1.800.04.. 

Credited from Banting Research Foundation $15,000 00 

Mclntyre Porcupine Mines 4.961 18 

Ontario Mining Association 10.000 00 

Silicosis Committee 50 00 

Charged to Insulin Committee Grants 35.295 30 



10 47 


47 14 


25 48 


320 08 


148 45 


166 30 


426 45 


96 49 


72 35 


35 10 


24 85 



150 00 

6.040 11 

640 92 

3,843 36 



$72,806 48 



65.306 48 

$7,500 00 
(b) Best Research: 

Research Associate. C. H. Best. 12 mos. (see also Department of 

Physiology ) $2,500 00 

Physiology: 

Research Associate. J. Markowitz (part time — Sessional I 450 00 

Research Assistants: 

H. E. Woodward, 12 mos.. $1,900 — $21.25 1.878 75 

Mrs. Jean P. Fletcher. 12 mos 900 00 

O. M. Solandt. 3 mos 330 00 

E. A. Dobson. 30 hrs. (paid also $225 in department I 15 00 

Lecturer, J. M. Hershey. 4 mos. (part time I 444 44 

Fellows (part time — Sessional) : 

D. A. Davidson. 9 mos. (paid also $250 in Anatomv ) 300 00 

B. H. B. Hallam. 3 mos '. 240 00 

Technical Assistants: 

F. L. Robinson. Head of Technical Staff. 12 mos. (share of 

salarv charged to Research — see also Dept. I $500 — $5 495 00 

Miss G. I. Harpell, 12 mos 1.000 00 

L. V. Hodgins, 12 mos 900 00 

G. Scattergood. 12 mos. (paid also $50 in School of 

Nursing I 850 00 

Miss M. L. Palmer. 12 mos 800 00 

Mrs. J. M. D. Williamson. 12 mos 720 00 

Chas. Scattergood. 4% mos 270 00 

T. Beaton, 1 month 65 00 

John Young. 1 week 15 00 

Assistant Animal Caretaker. W. Dobbie. 7 mos. to 31 Jan 583 33 

Clerical Assistant. Miss Dorothy Waugh. 1 month (paid also 

$225 in Medical Faculty t 100 00 

Physiological Hygiene: 

Research Associates, each 12 mos.: 

Mrs. Ruth C. Partridge (share of salary charged to Re- 
search—see also .School of Hygiene) $1.100— $11.25 1.088 75 

Miss J. H. Ridout (paid also in Connaught Laboratories) 

$1.100- $11.25 1.088 75 

Research Assistants: 

Miss E. F. Dudlev Martin. 12 mos.. $1,200 — $12..50 1.187 50 

J. Campbell.....' 400 00 

Technical Assistants, each 12 mos.: 

C. R. Cowan, i^enior (share of salarv charged to Research 

— see also .School of Hygiene > $400 — $4 396 00 



296 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Miss L. C. Barber 800 00 

Miss M. Luxton 800 00 

J. G. Truax 800 00 

Miss M. E. Hocking 750 00 

Miss A. Jaffray 700 00 

C. L. Skelding < share of salary charged to Research — 

see also School of Hygiene t 250 00 

J. Scattergood. 86Yj hrs. (paid also $500 in School of 

Hygiene) 42 81 



Expenses < $9,329.48) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd.. hardware 

American Heart Association, film 

American Institute of Physics, journal 

Art Metropole, microscope parts 

Ayearst. McKenna & Harrison, drugs 

British Drug Houses, chemicals 

F. J. Burns & Co., frogs 

Cambridge Instrument Co., instrument repairs 

Canadian Industries Ltd., chemicals 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware and chemicals 

Canadian Office & School Furniture. Ltd., desk and chair. ... 

Central .Scientific Co.. glassware, chemicals, etc 

R. H. Chappell, glassblowing 

Warren E. Collins Inc., chemicals 

Connaught Laboratories, reprints, alcohol, flasks, etc 

Joseph Cooper Ltd.. meat 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd., uniforms 

A. C. Cossor Ltd.. cardiograph sockets and valves 

E. Cullen, animals 

A. C. Downing, galvanometers 

Eastman Photographic Service, film 

Eastman Photographic Stores, kodachrome , 

J. A. Fontaine, frogs 

Miss M. Godard, 4 weeks' clerical assistance (see also Bi 

Chemistry ) , 

J. F. Hartz Co.. instruments 

Geo. H. Hees, Son & Co., Venetian blinds , 

Ingram & Bell, surgical unit , 

J. Irwin, overtime services re Physiological Society 

Langley. Harris & Co., dog biscuits 

Mallinckrodt Chemical Works, ether 

Muirhead & Co.. resistance units 

R. H. Nichols, galvanometer 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. cabinet and guides 

Ontario Typewriter Co.. overhauling dictaphone 

J. L. Parkinson, electrode cells, lamps, etc 

Pfanstiehl Chemical Co.. chemicals 

Photographic Service, prints, slides, etc 

Prest-O-Lite Storage Battery Co., batteries 

W. G. Pye & Co., potentiometer, etc 

Screen & Sound Service, slide cabinet 

Robt. Simpson Co., chairs 

H. W. Sullivan Ltd.. air condenser 

I nderwood-Elliiitt-Fisher Ltd., typewriter 

Wholesale Radio Service, radio parts 

I niversity Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under .?10 ( 13 » 



$21,160 33 



$122 75 

20 67 

12 10 

141 12 

731 55 

97 12 

115 69 

65 78 

308 84 

210 46 

131 30 

572 58 

186 50 

80 54 

155 93 

395 92 

25 79 

621 02 

380 00 

368 68 

20 09 

25 48 

77 00 

70 00 
264 10 

76 43 

365 85 

10 50 

25 25 

36 20 
127 19 

71 00 
54 01 

26 60 
279 74 
213 52 

27 78 
35 37 

159 18 

37 50 
47 25 

78 29 
85 00 
49 76 

169 43 
64 34 



Travelling expenses: 

D. Bronk 

A. Fisher 

J. Fulton 

M. H. Jacobs 

D. Y. Solandt . . . . 
N. B. Taylor.... 

E. T. Waters..., 
H. E. Woodward. 



$38 90 
51 45 
48 95 
39 88 

200 00 

175 00 
75 00 

250 00 



$879 18 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 297 

Less amount returned by Dr. i".. H. Best from 

advance of 1935-36 48 70 

830 48 

Sundry disbursements by department : 

Postage. S31.70; telegrams and telephone. S22.88; supplies 

and sundries. S47.80 102 38 

Superintendents Dept.. freight. $75.52; labour, $424.93: 

material, $352.47 852 92 

Contribution to Pension Funds 302 50 

$30,489 81 

Less sundry credits S25 60 

Charged to Insulin Committee Grants 27,964 21 

• 27.989 81 



$2,500 00 



$10,000 00 

$27,028 39 

APPENDIX in. 

UNIVERSITY PRESS 

Ledger Balances ( net I as at 30 June. 1936 $75,370 32 

Transferred to General I niversitv Revenue, appropriation by Board of 

Governors for 1936-37 ' 30.000 00 

$45,370 32 

Transactions for the year ending 30 June. 1937. 

Receipts, including $38.82 outstanding and receivable on 

30 June, 1937 $215,122 24 

Interest allowed on net balances 2.144 31 

S2 17.266 55 

Expenditures 209.785 29 

$7,481 26 



Net Balance at credit 30 June. 1937 $52,851 58 



NOTE 

Supplementary to the above the Acting Manager of the Press had on 

hand on 30 June, 1937, as shown by his records. Inventory S27.486.63 

(including $3,921.37 work in progress), and Accounts Receivable 
(net) $12,189.37. 

Details of Expenditures 
Salaries and wages : 

R. J. Hamilton. Manager, (a $5,000 (ob. 14 Nov. — salary to 31 Dec. 

paid to Estate ) S2.500 — $38.75 $2,461 25 

A. Gordon Burns, Assistant Manager. 12 mos., $3,000 — $37.50 2.962 50 

Miss E. M. Walker. Secretarv. 12 mos.. $1,900 — $21.25 1.878 75 

Miss E. Baguley, Cashier, 12 mos., $1,300 — $13.75 1.286 25 

Miss I. West wood. Assistant Cashier, 12 mos 950 00 

Clerks, each 12 mos.: 

Miss M. Beattie. $1,300 — S13.75 1.286 25 

Miss I. E. McTaggart, $1,300 — $13.75 1,286 25 

Miss W. Hills, $1,092 — $11.15 1.080 85 

Mrs. Florence Friendship, $1,092 — $11.15 1.080 85 

Miss I. Potter 830 00 

G. Edwards. Caretaker. 12 mos., $1,.508 — $16.35 1.491 65 

A. Bigwood. Messenger. 12 mos 624 00 

Pay lists, wages of employees 62.970 54 

Editorial Services: 

Miss Alison Ewart, General Editor. 12 mos. (paid also $45 from 

University Quarterly! $1,700 — $18.75 $1.68125 

Miss Mary Thompson. Assistant to General Editor, 12 mos 950 00 

G. W. Brown 500 00 

A. S. P. Woodhouse .500 00 

V. W. Bladen 400 00 

W. P. M. Kennedy 250 00 



$80,189 14 



298 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

A. Brady 200 00 

E. K. Brown 200 00 

4,681 25 

Payments to contributors to publications 1,913 75 

Payments of royalties and returns from sales 2,039 57 

St. George's School Printing Reserve 429 22 

Supplies and general maintenance: 

Alexander & Cable, lithographing diplomas $132 50 

H. E. Allen Bros., gilding 96 62 

Art Metropole. pens, paper boards, etc 39 09 

D. A. Balfour Cki.. carbon paper 48 25 

Barber-Ellis Ltd.. envelopes, paper, etc 3.199 58 

Better Packages of Canada, package sealer, etc 60 89 

Blackball & Co.. binding 150 96 

Bostitch Ltd.. stapler and staples 49 25 

W. Bourne Leather Goods Co., covers and corners 112 87 

Brigden"s Ltd.. diagrams and portraits 133 98 

J. R. Brooks, paper 30 00 

Brown Bros., paper, ink, baskets, etc 2.821 88 

Buntin-Reid Co.. paper 222 39 

Burroughs Adding Machine Co.. rental of machines 86 42 

Burt Business Forms Ltd.. note books, etc 56 30 

Chas. Bush Ltd.. ink 565 77 

Bernard Cairns, rubber stamps 30 10 

Canada Carbon & Ribbon Co., coupons 244 S5 

Canada Metal Co.. metal 460 81 

Canada Paper Wholesale Ltd., paper 436 12 

Canadian Linotype Ltd.. repairs 28 69 

Canadian Pacific Railway Co.. telegrams 43 77 

Eugene E. Carroll, sharpening knives 29 25 

Carrolls Canadian Metals, metals and screws 86 64 

Walter A. Carveth & Co.. needles, scissors and forceps 108 25 

Delang & Pettit. glue 123 05 

\^ alter Dickinson & Co.. leads, erasers and pencils 219 72 

Dixon Pencil Co.. pencils and refills 39 23 

Dominion Blank Book Co.. covers, etc 1,110 95 

Dominion Envelope & Cartons Ltd., envelopes 117 02 

Dominion Paper Box Co.. filing boxes 182 73 

V. W. Dyas, commissions 47 25 

Eclipse Fountain Pen & Pencil Co., pens 57 11 

E. B. Eddy Co.. paper 5.197 40 

Elliott Addressing Machine Co., stencils 35 44 

Aberhart Faber Pencil Co.. pencils and refills 40 48 

J. E. Emerson, electrical supplies 51 06 

Geo. Everall Co., envelopes 101 30 

W. J. Gage & Co., envelopes, compasses, brushes, etc 876 22 

D. Gestetner Ltd.. ink and stencils 96 07 

Globe Envelopes Ltd.. envelopes 45 08 

Gordon. Mackay & Co.. flannell 45 59 

Grand & Toy. desk, chair, envelopes, etc 157 53 

E. B. Griffith. Christmas cards and envelopes 401 18 

Fred W. Halls, paper 33 34 

John Hamilton, commissions 177 46 

G. A. Hardie & Co.. wipers 37 50 

W. E. Hardman & Co.. ruling 64 25 

Henderson Bros., ruling and paper 520 35 

Howard Bros., gilding and stamping 396 72 

Imperial Oil Ltd., gas and oil 46 97 

C. H. Johnson & Son. cartage 537 75 

Keuffel & Esser, slides and rules 189 74 

The Levi's, wipers 110 50 

Luckett Loose Leaf Ltd., covers and refills 988 26 

Lumlev & Hewitt, ruling and perforating 128 00 

A. R. MacDougall & Co.. rubber bands 32 60 

Meredith. Simmons & Co.. paste 41 45 

Mono-Lino Typesetting Co.. typesetting 178 91 

Monotype Co.. paper and type metal 639 38 

J. L. Slorrison Co.. cutter parts, etc 50 73 

Moyer School Supplies, maps 31 12 

Nichols Advertisers Ltd.. pads 53 07 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co.. steel section and label holders 2" .50 

Paper Sales Ltd.. paper 100 05 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 



299 



Parker Fountain Pen Co.. pens, pencils and repairs 

R. A. Phillips Ltd.. crests, cushion covers and pennants 

Photo Engravers & Electrotypers Ltd., electros, embossing, etc.. 
Premier Engravers & Electrotypers Ltd., electros and half tones. 

Provincial Paper Ltd., paper 

Queen City Paper & Twine Co., paper and twine 

Raine Engraving Co., dye 

Ratcliffe Paper Co.. paper 

Reed Canadian Engravers Ltd., half tones and cuts 

Reliance Engravers, half tones 

Remington-Rand Ltd.. typewriter and ribbons 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter rental and inspection 

W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co., ink and repairs 

Howard Smith Paper Mills, paper 

Standard Embossing Co., labels and letterheads 

Stephens Sales Ltd.. ink, paper and stencils 

B. & F. H. Thomson Co., gold leaf 

Toronto Envelope Co.. envelopes 

Toronto Graphic Arts Council, dues 

Toronto Type Foundry, brushes, wire, etc 

Townsley Printers' Supply & Machinery Co., repairs, etc 

Lnderwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., coupons, etc 

United Paper Mills Ltd.. paper 

Universal Thread Co., silk 

Venus Pencil Co.. pencils, etc 

Victoria Paper & Tw^ine Co., cups, twine, etc 

V isible Records Ltd.. cards 

Wahl Co.. refills and repairs 

L. E. Waterman Co.. ink, pens and pencils 

Whyte Hook Paper Co., buckram and cloth 

Wilson-Munroe Co., paper, board and thread 

Books, etc.: 

Thos. Allen & Co 

Alleyn & Bacon 

American Book Co 

American Institute of Steel Construction 

American Library Association 

American Medical Association 

American Public Health Association 

Angus & Robertson 

Annual Review of Bio-Chemistry 

D. Appleton Century Co 

Baker & Taylor 

Barnes & Noble 

Blackie & Sons 

P. Blakiston, Sons & Co 

R. R. Bowker Co 

F. A. Brockhaus 

Bureau of Publications. Teachers' College 

Burroughs & Co 

Butterworth & Co 

Canadian Dental Research Foundation 

Canadian Geographic Society 

Canadian Pharmaceutical Association 

Carswell Co 

Cassell & Co 

W. & R. Chambers 

Chemical Rubber Co 

J. & A. Churchill 

Clarke. Irwin Co 

Wm. Collins & Co 

Columbia University Press 

Copp, Clark Co 

Wm. Dawson Subscription Service 

J. M. Dent & Sons 

Dental Items of Interest 

Dodd. Meade & Co 

Doubleday. Doran & Gundy 

Forest Press 

W. J. Gage & Co 

Gaulon & Fils 

Ginn & Co 



491 


80 


165 


95 


783 52 


1,054 93 


8.752 


59 


223 


50 


37 


74 


69 


20 


2.213 


74 


380 


19 


71 


40 


243 00 


67 


90 


2.611 


79 


398 68 


344 


19 


94 


50 


653 


08 


540 00 


64 20 


159 63 


97 


73 


3.931 


44 


36 


49 


180 


39 


331 


91 


37 


67 


49 21 


262 


54 


165 


28 


853 23 


100 67 


101 


67 


148 


19 


189 20 


277 


44 


129 


19 


43 


87 


41 


33 


32 


00 


490 20 


51 


16 


213 


35 


258 


34 


745 


56 


108 


56 


159 


76 


58 98 


49 


13 


65 


25 


55 


80 


102 


50 


77 


25 


318 


85 


300 


81 


108 


21 


325 


00 


184 


70 


972 


63 


42 


22 


126 


19 


1.992 


42 


58 


44 


975 


64 


285 


99 


606 


91 


30 


34 


256 


73 


856 


08 


459 


43 


1.019 


45 



300 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Gregg & Co 

Harcourt, Brace & Co 

Harper Bros 

Harvard University Press 

W. Heffer & Sons 

H. M. Stationery Office 

Henry Holt & Co 

Johns Hopkins Press 

Houghton, Mifflin Co 

International Correspondence Schools 

Miss Alice Kemp 

Otto Lange 

Lea & Febiger 

J. B. Lippincott Co 

Longmans. Green & Co 

McAinsh & Co 

McClelland & Stewart 

McGraw-Hill Book Co 

Geo. J. McLeod Ltd 

Macmillan Co 

Midwest Book Co 

Musson Book Co 

National Research Council 

Thos. Nelson & Co 

W. W. Norton & Co 

Oxford University Press 

George Philip & Son 

Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons 

Prentice, Hall. Inc 

Princeton University Press 

Psychological Review 

Receiver-General of Canada 

Reinhold Publishing Co 

Ritter Dental Mfg. Co 

Ronald Press Co 

Russell Sage Foundation Co 

Ryerson Press 

S. J. Reginald Saunders 

Carl Schoch 

Chas. Scribner's Sons 

Simpkin, Marshall Ltd 

Somerset Publishing Co 

Southwestern Publishing Co 

Stamford University Press 

G. E. Stechert & Co 

Chas. E. Thomas 

University of Chicago, Dept. of Education 

University of Chicago Press 

University of North Carolina Press 

University Prints 

D. Van Nostrand Co 

George Wahr & Co 

John Wilev & .Sons 

Williams & Wilkins 

H. W. Wilson & Co 

World Book Co 

Yale I Jniversity Press 

Accounts under $25 ( 3>56 » 

Sundry purchases, second hand books 

W. T. Jackman, honorarium re publication of book 

A. Gordon Burns, expenses in connection with visit to Book Depart- 
ments of other Universities 

Microscopes 

Advertising, $719.49; postage and excise stamps, $2,475.04; bank 
exchange. $105.64; cleaning, $133.65; freight, etc., $700.72; 
meals for night work. $125; sundries. 231.40 

Heat. $1.000..50; electric current, $729.40; gas, $285.45; telephone 
$359.12 ; water. $75 ". 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $1,166.17; labour, $289.08; material. 
1329.11 ; customs entries. $.53.75 

Contributions to Employees* Pensions Account 



128 85 


826 27 


636 04 


272 03 


114 


10 


57 


39 


1.156 04 


41 


12 


902 


12 


160 00 


.50 00 


33 09 


1,508 80 


75 38 


1.737 59 


3,103 


42 


239 


14 


2,7.58 26 


68 02 


6,010 80 


63 


51 


577 34 


70 00 


626 


19 


36 07 


1,192 


10 


318 


14 


740 40 


268 


64 


32 


01 


82 


33 


124 


11 


78 


21 


96 


84 


33 


97 


26 47 


507 


84 


136 39 


611 


95 


257 


86 


2.447 


82 


27 


51 


277 


63 


40 26 


131 


21 


37 


79 


25 


20 


333 51 


25 48 


53 


57 


651 


23 


56 37 


2,956 


24 


3.298 


51 


99 


00 


53 


50 


122 07 


2,287 


74 


311 


89 


250 00 


146 63 


4.272 


75 


4,490 


94 


2.449.47 


1.838 


11 


772 


19 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 301 

Sale? Tax, Collector of Customs and Excise 
Alterations, partitions, etc.. 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $372.01; 



material, $323.63 


6,229 12 
695 64 








$209,785 29 



APPENDIX IV. 
SUPERINTENDENTS STORES AND SUNDRY LABOl R ACCOUNT 

Ledger Balance, 30 June. 1936 $10,572 39 

Purchases made during 1936-37: 

Acme Paint & Varnish Co.. paint $25 17 

Acme Waste Mfg. Co., waste 143 61 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 1,964 35 

Aluminum Co.. paste, etc 154 67 

Armstrong Cork & Insulation Co., cork insulating 198 20 

Armstrong Door Co.. sashes 28 40 

Associated Chemical Co.. chemicals, etc 145 53 

Atlas Engineering & Machine Co., circulator, pump, etc 196 60 

Baines & David, steel rods and angles 349 49 

Beardmore & Co.. belting 75 13 

Beldam's Asbestos Packing & General Mfg. Co., packing 284 06 

Bennett & Wright, plumber's supplies 693 25 

Berry Bros., paint, varnish, etc 473 27 

Black & Decker Mfg. Co., repairing hammer, etc 66 58 

Boeckh & Co.. brushes. 29 83 

Bond Engineering Works, standards 49 05 

Brown Bros., ledger sheets, etc 38 34 

J. B. Buckham, supplying and installing acoustic materials 155 00 

Builders" Supplies Ltd.. stone, gravel, etc 338 82 

Robert Bury & Co., lumber 2,012 67 

Buyers" Door & Mfg. Co.. doors, frames, shutters, etc 280 20 

Cactizona Products Co.. oil 106 17 

Canada Building Material Ltd.. plaster 70 41 

Canada Hardware Ltd.. locks, bolts, etc 107 11 

Canada Metal Co., weights, solder, etc 494 81 

Canada Wire & Cable Co.. wire 186 79 

Canadian Asbestos Ltd., asbestos, lumber, etc 242 89 

Canadian Blower & Forge Co., blowers 172 86 

Canadian Brass Co.. plumber's supplies 98 04 

Canadian Durex Abrasives Ltd., waterproof paper, etc 50 46 

Canadian General Electric Co., electrician's supplies 739 49 

Canadian Germicide Co.. towels, soap, etc 1.147 53 

Canadian Ice Machine Co., coils, valves, etc 219 40 

Canadian Industries Ltd.. paint, enamel, etc 362 39 

Canadian Ingersoll-Rand Co.. centrifugal unloader. etc 224 50 

Canadian Johns-Manville Co., cement, asbestos, etc 739 77 

Canadian National Carbon Co., batteries, etc 218 51 

Canadian National Institute for the Blind, brushes, brooms, etc 278 59 

Canadian Powers Regulator Co.. thermostats 89 85 

Canadian S. K. F. Co.. bearings 57 16 

Canadian Sirocco Co.. motors, etc 240 46 

Canadian Westinghouse Co.. refrigerators, parts, etc 1.131 84 

Century Chemical Products Co.. polish 41 55 

Chadwick Electric Co., electrician"s supplies 215 97 

L. Chettle, bricks. 45 00 

City Treasurer, gulley tops 29 00 

Coleman Lamp & Stove Co.. stove, plate, etc 42 88 

Colling Tire -Shop, tires, tubes, etc 257 50 

Commercial Lithf)graph Co.. forms 120 74 

Compressed Air Ecjuipment Co., rental of compressors 40 60 

Concrete Pipe Co., pipes 66 54 

Conslidated Plate Glass Co 595 34 

Continental Can Co., cans 45 73 

Corbett-Cowley Ltd.. uniforms, coats and shirts 567 22 

Corning Glass Works, glass globes 53 93 

Crane Ltd.. plumber's supplies 2.090 52 

Cjown Diamond Paint Co., paint 163 85 

W. H. Cunningham & Hill Ltd.. boiler repairs and parts 106 87 

Currie Products Ltd., roofing felt, etc , 116 02 



302 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Darling Bros, valves, etc 

Darnell Corporation, sockets 

Wm. S. Dean, castings 

Diamond Cleanser & Soaps Ltd., soap flakes 

Henry Disston Sons Ltd., saws, blades, etc 

Dominion Carbon Brush Co., brushes 

Dominion Linseed Oil Co 

Dominion Oxygen Co 

Dominion Radiator & Boiler Co., fire doors, etc 

Dominion Rubber Co.. hose 

Downing & Co., fuses, etc 

Drew-Brown Ltd., turpentine 

Drygoods Specialty Co., cotton, etc 

C. A. Dunham Co., plumber's supplies 

Dunlop Tire & Rubber Goods Co., cushions, etc 

Dustbane Products Ltd., mops and cleaning compound 

Eagle Lock Co., locks, etc 

T. Eaton Co., towels, linoleum, etc 

Electrolux Ltd., cleaning unit, etc 

Empire Brass Mfg. Co., plumber's supplies 

Engineering Equipment Co., enamel 

Evans & Co., chamois and sponges 

Exide Batteries of Canada, batteries 

Fairbank Lumber & Coal Co., lumber 

Fenestra Canadian Metal Window and Steel Products, window and 

sash 

E. B. Fielding & Co., turpentine 

Thos. Firth and John Brown Ltd., steel 

Fitzgerald-McAvoy Wire Goods, screens, baskets, etc 

Garlock Packing Co., packing 

General Dry Batteries Ltd., batteries 

General Steel Wares Ltd., cans, kettles, etc 

Good Specialties Ltd., plumber's supplies 

Gooderham-Worts Ltd., alcohol 

Gordon, Mackay & Co., towels, etc 

Gordon Sponge & Chamois Co., chamois 

B. Greening Wire Co., screens, zinc, etc 

Grinnell Co., plumber's supplies 

Guelph Soaps 

Gunite Waterproofing Ltd., ferrolite 

Gurney Foundry Co., boiler 

Gutta Percha & Rubber Ltd., rubber boots, matting, etc 

Joe Hampton, brick, sand, etc 

G. A. Hardie & Co., pillow slips, etc 

W. Harris & Co., glue 

Geo. H. Hees. Son & Co.. cord 

Hodgson-Taylor Ltd., hauling 

Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, current 

Imperial Iron Corporation, furnace parts 

Imperial Oil Ltd., varsol, oil, etc 

Imperial Varnish & Color Co., paints and enamels 

Interlake Tissue Mills, towels 

International Water Supply Co., drilling 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., tiling 

Geo. Keith & Sons, grass seed 

Kilgour's Ltd., towels, plates, etc 

La France Fire Engine & Foamite Ltd.. extinguishers 

R. Laidlaw Lumber Co.. lumber 

Arthur S. Leitch Co., trap 

Leland Electric Ltd., electrician's supplies 

Linde Canadian Refrigeration Co., repairs 

Lowe Bros. Co., paint 

Lundy Fence Co., gauge and chain links 

McBain Foundry, castings, etc 

MacBeth & Evans Glass Co.. globes 

McColl-Frontenac Oil Co.. gasoline, etc 

S. McCord & Co'., cement, etc 

MacDonald Mfg. Co., pails 

McGregor-McIntyre Iron Works, tanks, etc 

Mclntyre & Taylor, coils, gratings, etc 

Alex. McKay Co., cement 

Frank G. MacKay Co.. chalk 



77 67 


46 75 


26 56 


617 43 


54 07 


75 23 


434 49 


363 65 


102 69 


28 87 


513 28 


292 00 


91 15 


412 65 


34 89 


64 17 


26 92 


291 44 


79 58 


628 28 


90 00 


127 50 


124 47 


58 80 


66 00 


778 32 


555 26 


119 58 


63 76 


277 86 


376 02 


206 86 


2,420 96 


239 86 


55 00 


250 24 


1,252 47 


243 00 


45 00 


26 85 


259 74 


78 75 


31 05 


50 66 


40 41 


35 00 


2.610 41 


87 51 


324 32 


210 08 


865 00 


204 00 


351 28 


329 80 


2,637 21 


301 21 


122 81 


42 00 


25 65 


25 21 


91 37 


26 90 


95 24 


385 86 


2,438 42 


62 65 


26 17 


142 36 


30 65 


300 11 


27 64 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 303 

Marietta Co., enamel, resin, etc 34 97 

Masco Co., electrician's supplies 3,093 73 

A. Middleton & Co., paint and varnish 512 81 

Minneapolis-Honeywell Regulator Co., motors, valves, etc 211 47 

Monarch Belting Co., belting 37 11 

Wallie Moore Paint Co., paint and enamel 611 ,52 

J. H. Morin & Co., paste, etc 37 56 

Herbert Morris Crane & Hoist Co., hoist 85 58 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., plumber's supplies 1,195 47 

Moyer School Supplies, chalk 46 84 

A. Muirhead Co., paint and varnish 283 55 

Alexander Murray Co., pitch 140 80 

National Drug & Chemical Co., chemicals 155 11 

National Equipment Co., tank and humidifier 98 90 

National Fire Proofing Co., tile 39 34 

National Grocers Co., matches, sugar, etc 167 43 

National Sewer Pipe Co., pipe, etc 44 38 

John Nelson & Son, plastering 91 75 

New Sanitary Wipers & Waste Co., cheesecloth 208 60 

Nichols Chemical Co., soda ash, etc 63 26 

North American Cyanamid Ltd., plant food 182 00 

Northern Electric Co., electrician's supplies 430 80 

O'Cedar of Canada, polish 77 72 

Office Specialty Mfg. Co., cabinets, etc 212 14 

Ohmite Mfg. Co., rheostat 29 32 

Oliver Lumber Co.. lumber 276 77 

Ontario Plumbing & Heating Supplies, plumber's supplies 41 39 

Ontario Rubber Co., sponges, etc 36 69 

Pacific Mills Ltd., paper 1,044 50 

Pannill Door Co.. doors, handrail, etc 65 42 

Pease Foundry Co.. fire pots 32 80 

Peckover's Ltd., steel 530 54 

Perrin, Turner Ltd., repairs to ice machine 65 75 

S. M. Peterkin, plumber's supplies 153 57 

Pilkington Bros., glass 820 49 

Provincial Treasurer of Ontario, truck license, $48; mixing wax 

license, $1 49 00 

N. Quesnel, repairing grates 31 82 

Ramsay Contracting Co., pump house, paving, etc 425 00 

Geo. Rathbone Lumber Co., lumber 2.858 78 

Regent Electric Supply Co., electrician's supplies 33 96 

Wm. Rennie Seeds Ltd.. peat and moss 176 40 

Renown Plumbing Supplies Ltd., plumbing supplies 130 08 

Robbins & Myers Co., pulley, etc 46 96 

Jas. Robertson & Co., plumber's supplies 64 87 

Alfred Rogers, insulation 38 28 

Rolls & Darlington, chemicals 41 88 

Roofers' Supply Co., roofing material 2,009 34 

Routery Bros., plastering 296 70 

Salem's Garage, repairs to truck 37 07 

Samuel. Son & Co., lumber, etc 846 79 

Sangamo Co., repairs to motors 147 85 

Sarco Ltd., steam traps 53 52 

Satin Finish Hardwood Flooring Ltd., lumber 175 10 

Scarfe & Co., paint, etc 493 72 

-Scythes & Co., rope, etc 40 35 

Shannon Bros., lumber 412 90 

Shaw & Wright, hardware 636 38 

W. Sherwood & Son. repairs to motors 690 80 

.Shipway Iron Wire Co., screens 389 99 

T. S. Simms & Co.. brushes 106 09 

Robt. Simpson Co.. chairs, rug, towels, etc 755 16 

Charles Albert Smith Ltd.. soap 356 80 

John B. Smith & Sons, lumber 2,386 25 

Smith & Chappie, plaster 26 23 

Square D Co.. electrician's supplies 293 55 

Standard Chemical Co., chemicals 37 80 

Wm. G. Stephenson, grading and surfacing 812 00 

.Stewart & Wood, glue, paint, etc 645 13 

Sun Oil Co.. oil 49 09 

Superior Electric Supply Co., electricians supplies 1.642 16 

Supertest Petroleum Corporation, gasoline LL51 00 



304 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Supreme Boiler & Engineering Co., boiler tubes 64 8) 

Textile Products Ltd.. cheesecloth, towels, etc 921 74 

T. G. Engineering Sales Co.. bars, bolts, etc 35 92 

Thaver's Ltd.. gasoline and oil 4.097 55 

Toronto Asphalt Roofing Mfg. Co 222 33 

Toronto Brick Co.. brick 68 40 

Trane Co., heaters 156 51 

Trelco Ltd., paint, etc 26 80 

Tremco Mfg. Co.. caulking compound 34 46 

United Steel Corporation, steel 35 74 

Mctoria Paper & Twine Co., towels 508 40 

C. C. \^ akefield & Co.. oils and castrol 555 58 

Waterous Ltd.. boiler 310 00 

West Disinfecting Co.. disinfectant 274 10 

White"? Hardware Ltd., hardware 1.829 05 

A. C. \^ ild & Co.. pipe covering 82 74 

Wilkinson-Kompass Ltd.. hardware 392 49 

A. R. Williams Machinery Co.. belting 32 80 

J. A. Wilson & Co.. lamp shades, etc 38 27 

Wilson & Cousens Ltd.. hose, couplings, etc 59 56 

Window Shades & Fittings, shades 85 40 

Wonderful Soap Co 121 50 

G. H. Wood & Co.. soap, drinking cups, etc 347 83 

Woods Mfg. Co.. tents, bags, etc 40 05 

A. L. Wynston Jr.. Ltd.. electricians supplies 2,717 45 

Lniversity Press, printing and stationery 124 80 

Accounts under S25 ( 173 ) 1,524 44 

Superintendent's Dept.. freight. S237.75: labour. -14.453.76; material. 

S800.13 5,491 64 

$92,928 80 

Less gasoline tax refunded 66 88 



$92,861 92 



Sundry labour as per pay lists: 

Trade mechanics and general workmen $142,898 58 

Firemen, nightwatchmen, etc 51,745 93 

Cleaners and miscellaneous 76,643 17 



Apportionment of the foregoing: 

Administration (§10.675.12 I : Labour 

Bursar's Office 12 04 

Registrar's Office 11 27 

-Superintendent's Office 1.841 85 

Convocation Hall and Simcoe Hall 7.725 30 

President's House 70 13 

Library (S4. 799.70) : 

Maintenance 161 24 

Building 3.312 14 

Royal Ontario Museum 42,894 75 

Athletics. Physical Training. Military .Studies, etc. 
< $6,863.90 I ! 

Athletics and Physical Training — Men ....*. 37 65 

Athletics and Physical Training ^ — Women 1 90 

Health Service — Men 1 20 

Military Studies 8 93 

Hart House 4,134 36 

Women's Building f 44 Hoskin Avenue I 378 35 

Military Studies Building 632 55 

Faculty of Arts < $41,838.76 1 : 

Physics 495 89 

Astronomy 177 51 

Geology 11-^ 22 

Mineralogy 55 95 

Chemistry' 997 88 

Biology .529 10 

Botany 7.53 06 

History 

Fine Art 136 94 



$103,434 31 



$271,287 68 
$374,721 99 



Material 

27 

1 27 

103 00 

880 12 

29 87 

312 14 
1,014 18 
4.053 95 



11 88 

63 00 

1 05 

4 38 

1.450 25 

29 05 

109 35 

899 83 

191 50 

63 28 

27 .50 

784 40 

558 51 

810 62 

19 

83 50 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 305 



Geography 5 65 

Political Economy 

Psychology 166 17 

University College Departments 3 90 

University College General Expenses 1 20 

University College Building 7.998 31 

McLennan Laboratory 2,786 53 

Chemical Building 2,550 41 

Biological Building 2,847 78 

Botany Building 3,087 84 

Baldwin House 565 09 

No. 43 St. George St 521 37 

No. 45 St. George St 353 45 

No. 47 St. George St 313 44 

Economics Building 4.593 35 

Psychology Building 1.490 23 

David Dunlap Observatory 1,330 88 

Faculty of Medicine ( $29,781.68 1 : 

Anatomy 413 02 

Pathology and Bacteriology 676 33 

Pathological Chemistry 182 07 

Pharmacy and Pharmacology' 1 55 

Bio-Chemistry (including Zymology) 48 45 

Physiology 69 62 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 49 83 

Medicine 90 11 

Paediatrics 28 87 

Surgery 

Obstetrics and Gynaecology 

Art Service 7 45 

General Expenses 20 94 

Medical Building 4,159 51 

Banting Institute 7,138 70 

Anatomical Building 2.237 58 

Hygiene Building 8,866 50 

-School of Hygiene 19 78 

Faculty of Applied Science ($18,625.14) : 

Electrical Engineering 167 22 

Mechanical Engineering 109 20 

Civil Engineering: Municipal and Structural 39 94 

Civil Engineering: Surveying and Geodesy 25 83 

Mining Engineering 146 78 

Metallurgical Engineering 134 44 

Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry.... 1.248 64 

School of Architecture 36 24 

Engineering Drawing 58 51 

Applied Physics 53 79 

General Expenses 102 81 

Photographic Service 7 00 

Mining Building (including Mill Building) 5.497 76 

Engineering Building 2.958 32 

Electrical Building 3.009 02 

Geodetic Observatory Building 306 76 

Faculty of Dentistry ($9.561. .50 I : 

Laboratory' and Infirmary Supplies, etc 2.530 46 

Dental Building 4,510 84 

Faculty of Household Science ($3,958,161 : 

Household Science Department 844 00 

Food Chemistry Department 75 80 

Household Science Building 2.186 05 

Faculty of Forestry ($579.82 » : 

Maintenance of Department 33 74 

Forestry Building 435 87 

School of Graduate .Studies 1 07 

School of Nursing ($3,175.99 i: 

.School Maintenance 

Residence Maintenance 188 40 

Building, No. 7 Queen's Park 2,138 10 

Examinations 1.52 19 

University Extension and Publicity 419 94 

Men's Residences 11,585 12 



6 


19 




42 


303 


12 


1 


02 


1,637 


98 


772 


38 


604 62 


851 


93 


414 40 


327 


22 


110 54 


127 


54 


48 04 


653 


45 


416 60 


268 


83 


391 


29 


489 


31 


148 47 


144 63 


430 


55 


282 20 


21 


52 


270 34 


18 


50 


3 


59 


2 06 


10 78 


37 


54 


907 


48 


1.043 


77 


419 


79 


1.169 


33 


16 38 


124 


13 


215 


59 


74 03 


109 


76 


217 69 


98 


59 


995 99 


61 


10 


23 


41 


49 02 


27 


67 


14 


21 


1,158 


25 


846 


25 


683 


62 


23 


57 


1,351 


15 


1.169 05 


218 


52 


29 26 


604 53 


3 


79 


106 


42 




03 


17 


80 


193 


36 


638 


33 


1 


46 


81 


56 


1,402 


55 



306 REPORT OF THE No. 12 

Women's Residences and Union ($6,531.17): 

Maintenance of Buildings 

Housekeeping Account 

Central Power Plant 

Miscellaneous and General ($33,935,131: 

Central Stores 

Grounds 

Protective Service 

Telephones 

Convocation Expenses 

Special Research ( including Banting and Best ) 

University Press '. . . . 

Ontario College of Education 

Alterations. University Press 

Women's Athletic Building Construction 

Work done for University organzations. members of 
staff, sundry incidental accounts, etc. (including Ac- 
counts Receivable on 30 June. $5,818.94 ) 

Cash Sales 



3.805 55 


864 01 


648 09 


1,213 52 


25,731 77 


1,758 97 


1,542 25 




10,818 32 


1.9i6 99 


16.008 03 


24 46 


3.628 37 




2 40 


si 


6.545 74 


6,177 04 


289 08 


329 11 


11.913 89 


2.037 69 


372 01 


323 63 


40 35 


19 44 


33.828 87 


39.275 13 




646 92 



$271,287 68 $88,956 81 



$360,244 49 



Ledger Balance, 30 June. 1937 $14,477 50 

(Superintendent's Inventory Value, $24,227.28) 

APPENDIX V. 
Ontario College of Educatiox 

Balance on hand 30 June, 1936 $ 43,529 87 

Receipts. 1936-37: 

Legislative Grant 202,680 00 

Fees of Students 63.383 61 

Aura Lee Grounds 600 00 

$310,193 48 
Expenditure for salaries and maintenance for tlie year ending 30 June. 1937 266,335 86 

Balance on hand 30 June, 1937 $43,857 62 

Salaries 

J. G. Althouse. Dean (paid also $350 for Extension Work) $6,000— $102.50 $5.897 50 

Professors: 

P. Sandiford, Educational Psychology and Director of Educational 

Research. $5.700— $95 ....'. 5,605 00 

F. E. Coombs. Methods in Elementary Subjects (paid also $350 for 
Extension Work ) $4.700— $71.50 4,628 50 

G. A. Cornish. Methods in Science. .$4.700—371.50 4.628 .50 

W. C. Ferguson, Methods in Modern Languages. $4.700— $71..50. .. . 4,628 50 

G. M. Jones. Methods in English and History, .$4,700- $71.50 4,628 50 

J. 0. Carlisle. Methods in Classics, also Supervisor of Practice-Teach- 
ing, $5.000— $77.50 4.922 50 

W. J. Lougheed. Methods in Mathematics (paid also $126 for Extens- 
ion Work I $4..300— $63..50 4,236 50 

Associate Professors: 

Miss W. G. Barnstead. also Director of Library School. $3,900— 

$55.50 3.844 50 

Miss L. L. Ockley. Household Science, $4.100— $59.50 4.040 50 

W. G. Bennett. Methods in Commercial Subjects (paid also $178 for 

Extension Work ) .$4.100— $.59..50 4.040 .50 

Assistant Professors: 

Miss Bertha Bassam. Library Science in Library School. $2.700— $33 2.667 00 

B. C. Diltz, Methods in English and History. $.3.8.50— $54.50 3,795 50 

J. A. Long. Educational Psychology (paid also 8420 for Extension 

Work! $3..500— $47.50. 3,452 50 

Lecturers, also Instructors in University .Schools: 

Miss A. Marsh, Art, $3,025— $38 2,987 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 307 

A. N. Scarrow, Manual Training ( paid also S300 for Extension 

Work » $4,000—857.50 ( retired 30 June i 3,942 50 

G. N. Bramfitt, Music, S4.000— 357.50 3,942 50 

F. Halbus, Physical Training. $3,525— §48 3,477 00 

Miss H. L. Bryans, Instructor, Physical Training. S3.300— $43.50 3,256 50 

Miss A. E. Robertson, Lecturer, Household Science. S3,200 — S41.50 3.158 50 

Miss Sally A. Ballard. Reviser and Instructor in Library Science. Library 

School, $1,500— $16.25 '. 1,483 75 

Instructors in University Schools: 

A. C. Lewis, Headmaster. $4.500— $67.50 4,432 50 

R. F. S. Baird. Teacher-Librarian. S3.300— $43.50 3.256 50 

G. A. Cline ( on leave of absence ) $4,000— $57.50 3,942 .50 

A. G. Croal (paid also $40 for Extension Work) $3.500— $47.50 3,452 50 

E. L. Daniher, $4,000— $57.50 3,942 50 

J. L. Gill. $3.700— $51.50 3,648 50 

H. A. Grainger (paid also $132 for Extension Work) $4,000— $57.50 3.942 50 

J. A. Irwin. $4,000— $57..50 3,942 50 

Norman McLeod, $3.800— $53.50 3,746 50 

J. H. Mills (paid also $38 for Extension Work) $4,000—857.50.... 3.942 50 

N. L. Murch (paid also $152 for Extension Work I $4,000-857.50.. 3,942 50 

L. H. Newell, $2.500- $30 2.470 00 

P. A. Petrie, $3,850 — $54.50 3,795 50 

C. E. Phillips (paid also $390 as Instructor in Pedagogy. $198 in 

School of Nursing, and $350 for Extension Work) $3,650— $50.50 . 3..599 50 

W. L. C. Richardson. $4,000— $57.50 3.942 50 

W. R. Stewart, $2,7.50— $33.75 2.716 25 

W. H. Williams (on leave of absence; ob. 5 May — salary to 30 June 

paid to widow ) $4.000-857.50 .' 3,942 50 

J. G. Workman, $4.000— $57.50 3,942 50 

G. W. Cochrane, Instructor in Swimming and Supervisor of U. T. S. 

Athletic Field and Sports. $2,400-828.50 2,371 50 

Special Instructors in Library Science: 
Administration: 

G. H. Locke < ob. 28 Jan.— paid to Estate ) 700 00 

F. C. Jennings (including expenses. $22 ) 172 00 

W. S. Wallace, College and Lniversity Libraries (paid also as Uni- 
versity Librarian » $350—83.50 346 50 

Miss Lillian H. Smith, Work with Boys and Girls 450 00 

Miss Frances Trotter, Story-Telling 150 00 

Miss Jean Merchant, School Libraries 150 00 

Miss M. Edna M. Poole, Special Libraries 150 00 

C. R. Sanderson. Circulation of Books 150 00 

Occasional Lecturers: 

Miss I. Locheed 50 00 

Miss F. Waldon 50 00 

F. W. Landon ( including expenses. S9.85 ) 39 85 

Miss K. Moyer ( including expenses $8.40 ) 38 40 

Miss Winnifred Gregory (including expenses $20) 35 00 

E. C. Kyte ( including expenses 816.50 ) 31 50 

E. J. Pratt (paid also in Faculties of Medicine and Dentistry) 30 00 

F. H. Walter 30 00 

J. A. Lowe ( including expenses, $16.48 ) 61 48 

G. S. Brett ( paid also in Faculty of Arts ) 30 00 

Victor Lange ( paid also in Faculty of Arts ) 30 00 

Mrs. Aimee Kennedy ( including expenses. $14.95) 29 95 

H. C. Gourlay (including expenses, $3.50 ) 18 50 

Griffith Taylor. Special Lecturer in Geography (paid also $3,877.50 in 

Faculty of Arts ) $2,500— $30 2,470 00 

Norman Davies, Lecturer in Methods for Specialists in Agriculture 

(Sessional) 300 00 

Supply Teachers '(i $7.50 per day : 

M. Sniderman, 1 77 days 1,327 50 

S. B. .McCready. 172 days 1.290 00 

R. Nicholson. 4 days 30 00 

H. G. Dearborn, 4 days (paid also in Educational Research) 30 00 

H. F. Balmer, 4 days ( paid also in Educational Research) 30 00 

Miss D. A. Thompson. Librarian, $2,400— $28.50 2.371 50 

Miss D. Walter, Assistant Librarian, $1.400— $15 1.385 00 

Clerical Staff: 

Miss L. Swinarton, Secretary. $1.950—121.88 1.928 12 



308 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Miss E. G. Seldon, $1,550— $16.88 1,533 12 

Miss G. Potter, $1.350— $14.38 1,335 62 

Miss J. M. Jeffrey, $1,250— $13.12 1,236 88 

Miss G. M. Harvey, |1,100— $11.25 1,088 75 

Retiring Allowances : 

Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Association, contribution of College 

for year ending 30 June, 1937, to fund for retiring 3.324 62 

Contribution of College for year ending 30 June. 1937, to llniversity 

Pensions Fund — Employees 958 00 

Cliarges on Investment : 

Accountant, Supreme Court of Ontario, proportion of annual payment 

on debenture issue of 1909 for interest and sinking fund 10,000 00 

Maintenance of Building: 
Fuel: 

Great Lakes Coal Co 3,206 66 

Gas, $250.81; electric current, $2,403.76; water, $243.25; telephone 

service, $342.91 3,240 73 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 604 03 

Cleaning ($5,788.53): 

Advance Window Cleaning Co 68 60 

Superintendents Dept., labour 5,719 93 

Repairs and renewals ($3,294.99) : 

Art Window Shade Co., repairs 5 65 

Canadian Powers Regulator Co., repairs to control system 55 71 

Federal Floor Finishing Co.. resurfacing floors 21 90 

John Nelson & Sons, plaster repairs 45 00 

Provincial Treasurer, public hall license 10 00 

Routery Bros., plaster repairs 30 65 

Wm. Stephenson, surfacing driveway, etc 156 38 

Triplex Weather Strip Co., weather stripping , . . 95 00 

Vulcan Asphalt & Supply Co., stairway repairs 90 00 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $1,999.47; material, $785.23.... 2,784 70 

Grounds : 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $799.40; material. $45.47 844 87 

Caretaker and Engineer. J. Harding, 12 mos., $1,450 — $1.5.62; (and 

overtime, $98.50 i 1.434 38 

Fireman ($780.29) : 

G. Thompson, 29 weeks, 3 days 647 43 

H. Britton, 6 weeks, 41/2 days 1.32 86 

Nightwatchmen ($1,400.34): 

H. McLeod, 12 mos.. $1,260 — $13.25 1,246 75 

W. Gordon, 27 nights 92 95 

A. Smith, 17 nights 60 64 

Workmen's Compensation (201.41) : 

Workmen's Compensation Board, to cover allowance paid to G. 

Thompson 96 41 

Hospital and medical services 105 00 

$20,796 23 
Less credits: Cleaning, etc., $442.57; fuel, light, etc., $157.36; 
telephones, $36.58. 636 51 

Maintenance of Aura Lee Grounds: 
Fuel: 

Central Coal Co $297 44 

Gas, $23.60; electric current, $55.67; water, $62.25; telephone 

service, $107.40 248 92 

Caretaker's supplies: 

Superintendent's Dept., material 23 01 

Repairs and occasional labour ( $730.46 ) : 

George Gilliyn, erecting fence 34 50 

Italian Mosaic & Tile Co., tiling 27 22 

M. Scott, share of erecting fence 6 00 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour. $473.02; material, $189.72 662 74 

Caretaker, G. Cruikshank. 12 mos. (with living quarters valued ^ 

I) $1.150 — $11.88 1,138 12 



$171,335 17 



$4,282 62 



$20,159 72 



$2,437 95 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 309 

Maintenance of Instruction: 

L'se of City School: 

Board of Education, City of Toronto $33,610 50 

Use of Rural Schools ( $387 1 : 

Honoraria as critic teachers — Agriculture: 

Principal R. H. King " 80 00 

D. G. McBain 135 00 

W. A. Porter 135 00 

Dean Althouse, expenses of students. Specialists in Agriculture. 37 00 

Payments to Librarians who assist in practical work ($750 I : 

Miss J. Baker 50 00 

Miss L. Booth 50 00 

Miss G. Boyle .50 00 

Miss H. Chadwick 50 00 

Miss H. Dean 50 00 

Miss M. Finch 50 00 

Miss M. Forraan 50 00 

Miss V Hyland 25 00 

Miss J. McCally 50 00 

Miss M. McGregor 50 00 

Miss E. Mackintosh 50 00 

Miss F. Murray 50 00 

Miss M. L. Newton 25 00 

Miss S. Robinson 50 00 

Miss B. Steele 25 00 

Miss H. G. Woolryche 50 00 

Miss A. Wright 25 00 

Laboratory and library assistance and pianist's services ($224.10) : 

Mrs. S. McKerrighan, 370 hours 122 10 

Pianist : 

Mrs. M. Graham. 96Vo hours 96 50 

Mrs. E. Cronenberg 2 00 

Miss D. Wright 3 .50 

Office supplies ($1,992.25) : 

D. Gestetner Ltd., ink and stencils Ill 12 

Postage 335 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 27 60 

Waller Office Appliance Co.. duplicator roll 8 25 

Miss Nancy Woodward, clerical assistance, 5 week? 75 00 

University Press, printing and stationery 809 31 

Sundry disbursements bv department 15 13 

Superintendent's Dept., labour. $413.69: material. $197.15 610 84 

Office supplies for Library School ($116.62) : 

D. Gestetner Ltd., stencils 29 32 

Grand & Toy, stationery 8 90 

Postage 43 00 

Robbins & Townsend, typewriter inspection 20 40 

Waller Office Appliance Co.. duplicator rolls 15 00 

General supplies and apparatus for class room use ($3,778.10) : 

Aikenhead Hardware Ltd., hardware 1 1 08 

Artists' Supply Co.. boards 14 40 

Bauer & Black, medical supplies 14 18 

British Drug Houses, chemicals, etc 18 38 

Canadian Laboratory Supplies, glassware 228 02 

City Dairy 11 55 

F. E. Cleland. provisions 74 76 

Copp, Clark Co., chalk 33 50 

T. Eaton Co., cloths, oilcloth and sundries 42 20 

W. J. Gage Co.. paper, books, etc 106 61 

Heintzman & Co., radio, piano rental, etc 134 18 

Matthews, McCutcheon & Co.. projector, etc 659 65 

Thos. Nelson & Sons, books 35 28 

W. B. Nicolson, scales 19 61 

Ryerson Press, protectors and cards 15 95 

L. C. Smith & (iorona Typewriters Ltd., typewriter rental 27 00 

Leslie V. Smith, lettering certificates 68 00 

Glenn Starr, magazines, etc 64 75 



310 



REPORT OF THE 



No. 12 



Underwood-Elliott-Fisher Ltd., typewriter rental 

Warwick Bros. & Riitter. paper 

Whaley, Royce & Co., song books, records, etc 

H. W. Wilson Co.. subscription 

Wilson Scientific Co., filters, glassware, tubing, etc 

Payments to Examiners, extra mural candidates: 

J. G. Althouse. $31.87; J. 0. Carlisle, 126.62; F. E. Coombs, 
$15.75; G. A. Cornish. $51.37; B. C. Dihz, $38.62; W. C. 
Ferguson. $23.^5; G. M. Jones, $34.50; J. A. Long, 

$15.75; W. J. Lougheed. $20.25 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 ( 31 * 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., freight. $16.21; labour, $236.10; 
material, $46.74 

Supplies and equipment for Library School ( $850.53 ) : 

American Library Association, books and subscriptions 

Bookshelf Bindery, books 

G. Ducharme, books 

Gordon & Gotch, subscription 

Grafton & Co., books and subscriptions 

Heintzman & Co.. music 

Dora Hoods Book Room, books 

Library of Congress, cards 

Lowe-Martin Co.. cards, pads, etc 

McQelland & Stewart, book 

Macmillan Co., books 

Postage 

H. W. Wilson & Co., books and subscriptions 

University Associates of Canada, books 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (26 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., labour, $23.54; material, $34.61 

Library books, periodicals, etc. ($705.48) : 

Bookshelf Bindery, buckram binding, etc 

Clark, Irwin Co.. books 

Evans Bros., subscription 

Joseph Fulton, binding 

Dickson Kenwin, books 

Library of Congress, cards 

Lowe-Martin Co.. cards 

Macmillan Co., books 

Sir Isaac Pitman & Sons, books 

Ryerson Press, books, etc 

Trans-Canada Press 

University Associates of Canada, encyclopaedia 

University of Western Ontario, books 

H. W. Wilson Co., subscription 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 (20 ) 

Physical training, including care of grounds, Field Day Sports, etc. 
($702.54): 

Lackie Mfg. Co., shields and medals 

Toronto Radio & Sports Ltd.. balls and bats 

University Arena, rental 

Harold A. Wilson Co., balls, gymnasium equipment and repairs. 

Accounts under $10 ( 3 t 

Superintendent's Dept.. labour, $28.75; material, $36.29 

Lunchroom equipment ($74.10): 

Cassidy's Ltd., tumblers 

Topeko & Co.. thermex 

Superintendent's Dept.. material 

Graduate Courses and Summer Session ( $2.000 ) : 
Instructors : 

J. G. Althouse 

M. A. Cameron 

F. E. Coombs 

J. A. Long 

C. E. Phillips 



418 75 

185 60 

17 30 

39 23 

429 79 



257 98 

412 88 

118 55 

19 87 

299 05 



65 08 


28 40 


14 00 


88 71 


38 37 


11 54 


22 50 


11 56 


51 61 


12 00 


19 20 


24 00 


68 27 


16 50 


229 72 


80 92 


10 00 


58 15 


27 39 


11 20 


13 78 


12 65 


10 00 


18 08 


19 55 


19 44 


18 48 


359 68 


15 00 


41 25 


15 00 


19 70 


50 05 


54 23 


173 52 


18 29 


100 00 


335 49 


10 20 


65 04 


4 35 


19 75 


50 00 


350 00 


210 00 


350 00 


350 00 


740 00 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO FOR 1937 311 

Department of Educational Research: 

Assistant Professor, M. A. Cameron, 12 mos. (paid $3,000 from 

Special Fund, also $210 for Extension Work ) 

Research Assistants ($2,456.72) : 

C. B. Conway. 12 mos , 

H. B. Dearborn, 9 mos., 28 days (paid also $10 as supply 

teacher ) 

H. F. Balmer, 7 mos., 20 days ( paid also $33.30 as supply 

teacher I 

Secretary. Miss K. M. Hobday, 12 mos., $1,600 — $17.50 

Clerical assistance ($1,900) : 

Miss M. Graham. 12 mos 

Miss M. Spalding, 12 mos 

Office supplies, printing, etc. ($1,989.96) : 

D. Gestetner Ltd., ink, stencils, etc 

Instruments Ltd., guides 

Lowe-Martin Co.. cabinet drawers, cards and files 

National Stationers, folders 

Postage 

Robbins & Townsend. typewriter inspection 

Wholesale Radio Co.. radio parts 

University Press, printing and stationery 

Accounts under $10 < 6 ) 

Sundry disbursements by department 

Superintendent's Dept., freight, $108.65: labour, $39.36; 

material. $25.44 173 45 

Publication of "The School" and distribution in Training Schools: 

'"The School," subscriptions 5,000 00 

$58,120 40 

$266,335 86 



1,000 00 


823 


34 


633 


38 


1.582 


50 


1,000 


00 


900 00 


45 68 


22 


75 


30 


92 


11 


00 


102 


00 


20 


80 


14 47 


1,527 


78 


31 


11 


10 00 



I 



ivuv X i^HU 



University of Toronto 
Library 




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